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Laparoscopic salpingotomy for tubal ectopic pregnancy
About 1 to 2% of all pregnancies are ectopic. Most ectopic pregnancies are located in the uterine tube, and surgery is often used as a treatment modality. Traditionally, salpingectomy has been the standard procedure, but salpingotomy provides a conservative option in women who wish to preserve future fertility, especially if the contralateral tube is absent or damaged. Many women do not have access to IVF for financial, geographical, or religious reasons. Having an intrauterine pregnancy after salpingotomy can reach up to 70%. In this video, we demonstrate this procedure in simple steps. The case was that of a 35-year-old lady, P0+1 with a previous right tubal pregnancy, which was treated with a partial salpingectomy through a mini-laparotomy 2 years before. She was admitted to the emergency department as she presented with a 6-week amenorrhea with left iliac fossa pain. Pelvic ultrasound showed left tubal ectopic pregnancy (4 by 3cm in size), with free fluid suggestive of hemoperitoneum. She opted for a conservative laparoscopic surgery as she was keen to have a spontaneous fertility.
B Amro, A Wattiez
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
2104 views
27 likes
2 comments
07:34
Laparoscopic salpingotomy for tubal ectopic pregnancy
About 1 to 2% of all pregnancies are ectopic. Most ectopic pregnancies are located in the uterine tube, and surgery is often used as a treatment modality. Traditionally, salpingectomy has been the standard procedure, but salpingotomy provides a conservative option in women who wish to preserve future fertility, especially if the contralateral tube is absent or damaged. Many women do not have access to IVF for financial, geographical, or religious reasons. Having an intrauterine pregnancy after salpingotomy can reach up to 70%. In this video, we demonstrate this procedure in simple steps. The case was that of a 35-year-old lady, P0+1 with a previous right tubal pregnancy, which was treated with a partial salpingectomy through a mini-laparotomy 2 years before. She was admitted to the emergency department as she presented with a 6-week amenorrhea with left iliac fossa pain. Pelvic ultrasound showed left tubal ectopic pregnancy (4 by 3cm in size), with free fluid suggestive of hemoperitoneum. She opted for a conservative laparoscopic surgery as she was keen to have a spontaneous fertility.
Surgical technique of tubal reanastomosis
Many women who undergo tubal ligation surgery later decide to have children again. One option available to these women is tubal ligation reversal, or tubal reanastomosis. In this microsurgery, the two separated parts of a uterine tube are surgically reunited. It is ideally performed in younger women under 39 years of age with good ovarian reserve. Depending on the previously used tubal ligation method, it may be necessary to first perform a diagnostic laparoscopy to check the condition of the uterus, the uterine tubes, and the ovaries and to make sure that the tubal length is sufficient for reversal. Following the proper principles of microsurgery, this procedure can yield very good results and offer a more economical option to women desirous of childbearing if the tubal pathology related to tubal sterilization is the only cause of infertility.
H Grover, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1093 views
10 likes
0 comments
08:48
Surgical technique of tubal reanastomosis
Many women who undergo tubal ligation surgery later decide to have children again. One option available to these women is tubal ligation reversal, or tubal reanastomosis. In this microsurgery, the two separated parts of a uterine tube are surgically reunited. It is ideally performed in younger women under 39 years of age with good ovarian reserve. Depending on the previously used tubal ligation method, it may be necessary to first perform a diagnostic laparoscopy to check the condition of the uterus, the uterine tubes, and the ovaries and to make sure that the tubal length is sufficient for reversal. Following the proper principles of microsurgery, this procedure can yield very good results and offer a more economical option to women desirous of childbearing if the tubal pathology related to tubal sterilization is the only cause of infertility.
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
H Grover, R Syed, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
6099 views
43 likes
13 comments
07:04
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
Laparoscopic rectal shaving for rectocervical endometriotic nodule
This is the case of a 32-year-old G0P0 woman presenting with severe dysmenorrhea, severe dyspareunia, and constipation. Pelvic examination showed a normal vagina, a fixed uterus, and mobile adnexae. Transvaginal ultrasonography (TvUSG) showed that the uterus and both ovaries were normal. A left parasalpingeal endometrioma (15mm), an obliterated Douglas pouch, as well as rectocervical and infiltrated rectal nodules (18mm and 0.6mm respectively) were also evidenced. Since bilateral ovaries were fixed to the pelvic sidewall, the operative strategy included bilateral ureterolysis and dissection of the hypogastric nerve and the pararectal fossa. Finally, the rectocervical nodule was mobilized by performing cervical and rectal shaving. The rectum was controlled by means of a methylene blue test. The final pathology was endometriosis.
H Altuntaş
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5187 views
485 likes
0 comments
06:58
Laparoscopic rectal shaving for rectocervical endometriotic nodule
This is the case of a 32-year-old G0P0 woman presenting with severe dysmenorrhea, severe dyspareunia, and constipation. Pelvic examination showed a normal vagina, a fixed uterus, and mobile adnexae. Transvaginal ultrasonography (TvUSG) showed that the uterus and both ovaries were normal. A left parasalpingeal endometrioma (15mm), an obliterated Douglas pouch, as well as rectocervical and infiltrated rectal nodules (18mm and 0.6mm respectively) were also evidenced. Since bilateral ovaries were fixed to the pelvic sidewall, the operative strategy included bilateral ureterolysis and dissection of the hypogastric nerve and the pararectal fossa. Finally, the rectocervical nodule was mobilized by performing cervical and rectal shaving. The rectum was controlled by means of a methylene blue test. The final pathology was endometriosis.
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
This video shows a reproducible approach to complete parametrectomy in a patient who had had a hysterectomy. The procedure begins with adhesiolysis and dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the parametrium. The paravesical fossa is then dissected medially and laterally using the umbilical artery as a landmark. The surgeon identifies the uterine artery and parametrium by following the umbilical artery. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the parametrium, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the pararectal spaces in order to isolate the posterior part of the parametrium. The ureter is dissected towards the ureteral channel and unroofed. The procedure is carried on with the complete isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the parametrium and the bladder. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum, paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The parametrium is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel. The vagina is cut with ultrasonic scissors using a cap of RUMI II as a guide, and the specimen is extracted vaginally. The surgeon performs a bilateral lymphadenectomy. In this step, the obturator nerve is dissected to prevent injuries at the medial aspect of the obturator artery. The vagina is closed with continued stitches vaginally using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
H Camuzcuoglu, B Sezgin
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4940 views
451 likes
0 comments
11:55
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
This video shows a reproducible approach to complete parametrectomy in a patient who had had a hysterectomy. The procedure begins with adhesiolysis and dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the parametrium. The paravesical fossa is then dissected medially and laterally using the umbilical artery as a landmark. The surgeon identifies the uterine artery and parametrium by following the umbilical artery. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the parametrium, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the pararectal spaces in order to isolate the posterior part of the parametrium. The ureter is dissected towards the ureteral channel and unroofed. The procedure is carried on with the complete isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the parametrium and the bladder. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum, paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The parametrium is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel. The vagina is cut with ultrasonic scissors using a cap of RUMI II as a guide, and the specimen is extracted vaginally. The surgeon performs a bilateral lymphadenectomy. In this step, the obturator nerve is dissected to prevent injuries at the medial aspect of the obturator artery. The vagina is closed with continued stitches vaginally using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3289 views
388 likes
0 comments
06:01
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
JB Dubuisson
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4701 views
586 likes
0 comments
08:01
Laparoscopy for peritonitis of gynecological origin, how far can we go?
This video shows the second and final laparoscopic treatment of a generalized peritonitis. The case is that of a 38-year-old woman who was initially managed with a first laparoscopy for peritonitis due to a pyosalpinx with left salpingectomy, adhesiolysis, and lavage. In the postoperative course, despite medical treatment, she continues to complain of a persistent severe biologic inflammatory syndrome (multidrug-resistant Bacteroides fragilis). At day 8, a second laparoscopy was decided upon, with suction, lavage, collapse, and lavage of residual pockets, adhesiolysis of bowel and both ovaries and remnant tube, and drainage. The patient recovered quickly.
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
JB Dubuisson
Lecture
1 year ago
4702 views
611 likes
0 comments
24:09
Laparoscopic anatomy of the pelvic floor involved in laparoscopic surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence
In this key lecture, Professor Jean-Bernard Dubuisson delineates the laparoscopic pelvic floor anatomy involved in surgical procedures for the management of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and urinary incontinence. Traditional anatomy considers three levels: pelvic and perineal muscles, ligaments, and the space between all fascias covering the organs. Visceral ligaments occupy an anteroposterior axis (pubovesical ligaments, bladder pillars, and uterosacral ligaments) and a transverse axis (lateral bladder ligaments, cardinal ligaments, paracervix and rectal pillars). The four attachment sites which may be used by the surgeon for fascia and pelvic organ attachment in POP surgery are discussed-- Cooper’s ligament, white line, ischial spine, and sacral promontory. Approximately 90 laparoscopic anatomy pictures are presented in this authoritative lecture. The dissection planes and the different pelvic spaces used for surgery are explained, insisting on the main vessels, nerves, plexus, ureters which are obstacles to bear in mind and to avoid.
Hysteroscopic treatment of a symptomatic isthmocele in a bicorporeal uterus
Clinical case: We report the case of a primigravida 36-year-old woman, with a unicervical bicorporeal uterus type. An isthmocele was diagnosed within a context of postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding and secondary infertility arising after C-section. The hydrosonography evidenced a moderate scar defect, the myometrium next to the "niche" measuring 3mm. Because of the symptomatology and the failure of multiple embryo transfer procedures, an operative hysteroscopy was performed. The patient was able to become pregnant spontaneously and give birth to a healthy child via C-section.

Conclusion: A minimally invasive procedure using a hysteroscopic resection of the fibrotic scar tissue is to be considered first, given the existence of an isthmocele in a symptomatic and/or infertile woman, even in the case of a uterine malformation. It is an effective and safe treatment option. However, it has to be considered only if the residual myometrium measures more than 3mm next to the defect.

Key words:
Hysteroscopic resection, isthmocele, cesarean section, bicorporeal uterus.
J Dubuisson, S Wegener, I Streuli
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4928 views
313 likes
0 comments
05:12
Hysteroscopic treatment of a symptomatic isthmocele in a bicorporeal uterus
Clinical case: We report the case of a primigravida 36-year-old woman, with a unicervical bicorporeal uterus type. An isthmocele was diagnosed within a context of postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding and secondary infertility arising after C-section. The hydrosonography evidenced a moderate scar defect, the myometrium next to the "niche" measuring 3mm. Because of the symptomatology and the failure of multiple embryo transfer procedures, an operative hysteroscopy was performed. The patient was able to become pregnant spontaneously and give birth to a healthy child via C-section.

Conclusion: A minimally invasive procedure using a hysteroscopic resection of the fibrotic scar tissue is to be considered first, given the existence of an isthmocele in a symptomatic and/or infertile woman, even in the case of a uterine malformation. It is an effective and safe treatment option. However, it has to be considered only if the residual myometrium measures more than 3mm next to the defect.

Key words:
Hysteroscopic resection, isthmocele, cesarean section, bicorporeal uterus.
Complete cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and HIPEC using a minimally invasive approach with NOTES extraction for peritoneal carcinomatosis from primary ovarian cancer
This is the case of a 60-year old woman who sought medical advice for constipation and increased abdominal perimeter in October 2016. The abdominal CT-scan suggested a peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian origin along with an ascites.
The PET-scan did not show any other lesions. CA125 levels were high (1265 U/mL). The biopsy was positive and immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed a high-grade ovarian peritoneal serous carcinoma (CK7: (+), CK20: (-), WTI: (+), P53: (+), PAX8: (+), CA125: (+), RE: (+)). The diagnosis of a FIGO stage IIIc peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian origin was established. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Carboplatin-Paclitaxel- Bevacizumab, 4 cycles).
The patient showed a favorable clinical response with ascites disappearance. The radiological imaging also showed the disappearance of peritoneal implants. Only a 3cm right parauterine mass persisted and a biochemical response was noted with CA125 decrease (32 U/mL). A radical cytoreductive surgery is decided upon using a minimally invasive intraperitoneal hyperthermia chemotherapy. A complete cytoreduction (CC0) was performed after tumor load determination with a Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI) of 4. It showed a greater pelvic affectation and a minimal involvement of the greater omentum. We performed a hysterectomy, a double adnexectomy, and a bilateral pelvic and parietal peritonectomy. Complete omentectomy with a gastro-omental arcade preservation, round ligament resection, bilateral iliac lymphadenectomy, and appendectomy were performed. The surgical specimens were extracted through the vagina. The patient underwent an intraoperative hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (42ºC) with Paclitaxel (60mg/m2). Postoperative outcomes were uneventful.
A Arjona-Sánchez, S Rufian Pena, D Garcilazo Arismendi, A Cosano Alvarez, A Moreno Navas, JM Sanchez Hidalgo, FJ Briceño Delgado
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6130 views
400 likes
0 comments
32:37
Complete cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and HIPEC using a minimally invasive approach with NOTES extraction for peritoneal carcinomatosis from primary ovarian cancer
This is the case of a 60-year old woman who sought medical advice for constipation and increased abdominal perimeter in October 2016. The abdominal CT-scan suggested a peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian origin along with an ascites.
The PET-scan did not show any other lesions. CA125 levels were high (1265 U/mL). The biopsy was positive and immunohistochemistry (IHC) showed a high-grade ovarian peritoneal serous carcinoma (CK7: (+), CK20: (-), WTI: (+), P53: (+), PAX8: (+), CA125: (+), RE: (+)). The diagnosis of a FIGO stage IIIc peritoneal carcinomatosis of ovarian origin was established. The patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (Carboplatin-Paclitaxel- Bevacizumab, 4 cycles).
The patient showed a favorable clinical response with ascites disappearance. The radiological imaging also showed the disappearance of peritoneal implants. Only a 3cm right parauterine mass persisted and a biochemical response was noted with CA125 decrease (32 U/mL). A radical cytoreductive surgery is decided upon using a minimally invasive intraperitoneal hyperthermia chemotherapy. A complete cytoreduction (CC0) was performed after tumor load determination with a Peritoneal Cancer Index (PCI) of 4. It showed a greater pelvic affectation and a minimal involvement of the greater omentum. We performed a hysterectomy, a double adnexectomy, and a bilateral pelvic and parietal peritonectomy. Complete omentectomy with a gastro-omental arcade preservation, round ligament resection, bilateral iliac lymphadenectomy, and appendectomy were performed. The surgical specimens were extracted through the vagina. The patient underwent an intraoperative hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (42ºC) with Paclitaxel (60mg/m2). Postoperative outcomes were uneventful.
Colorectal resection in deep endometriosis: multidisciplinary laparoscopic approach (colorectal and gynecologic surgical teams)
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 42-year-old woman with deep pelvic endometriosis with rectal infiltration. After hormone therapy, the patient was operated on due to chronic pain. A laparoscopic approach was performed by a multidisciplinary team including colorectal and gynecologic surgeons having a wide experience in this field.
A CT-scan, MRI, and colonoscopy were performed before the surgery showing a deep infiltrating endometriosis with anterior rectal bowel involvement in the images and normal colorectal mucosa in the endoscopy.
Under general anesthesia, the laparoscopic approach was performed with 4 trocars. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) required a hysterectomy and rectal resection to clean all the pelvic space. An end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed and the extraction of the specimen (uterus and rectum) was carried out transvaginally. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4 without complications.
JF Noguera, MD, PhD, J Gilabert-Estelles, J Aguirrezabalaga, B López, J Dolz
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3055 views
302 likes
0 comments
09:55
Colorectal resection in deep endometriosis: multidisciplinary laparoscopic approach (colorectal and gynecologic surgical teams)
In this video, we present the clinical case of a 42-year-old woman with deep pelvic endometriosis with rectal infiltration. After hormone therapy, the patient was operated on due to chronic pain. A laparoscopic approach was performed by a multidisciplinary team including colorectal and gynecologic surgeons having a wide experience in this field.
A CT-scan, MRI, and colonoscopy were performed before the surgery showing a deep infiltrating endometriosis with anterior rectal bowel involvement in the images and normal colorectal mucosa in the endoscopy.
Under general anesthesia, the laparoscopic approach was performed with 4 trocars. Deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) required a hysterectomy and rectal resection to clean all the pelvic space. An end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed and the extraction of the specimen (uterus and rectum) was carried out transvaginally. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4 without complications.
Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses for cervical agenesis
Cervical agenesis occurs in one in 80,000 to 100,000 births. According to the American Fertility Society, cervical agenesis should be classified as a type 1b Müllerian anomaly. According to the ESHRE/ESGE classification, it is classified in class C4 category.
This is the case of a 16 year-old female patient with primary amenorrhea and episodes of cyclical lower abdominal pain for one year. After complete examination and investigations, diagnosis of isolated cervical agenesis with hematometra and left ovarian chocolate cyst was established. Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses were performed using an innovative technique and an appropriate management of endometriosis. A hysteroscopy was later performed and showed anastomotic patency. As a result, the patient has been experiencing spontaneous regular menstruation for nine months.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1961 views
178 likes
1 comment
07:49
Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses for cervical agenesis
Cervical agenesis occurs in one in 80,000 to 100,000 births. According to the American Fertility Society, cervical agenesis should be classified as a type 1b Müllerian anomaly. According to the ESHRE/ESGE classification, it is classified in class C4 category.
This is the case of a 16 year-old female patient with primary amenorrhea and episodes of cyclical lower abdominal pain for one year. After complete examination and investigations, diagnosis of isolated cervical agenesis with hematometra and left ovarian chocolate cyst was established. Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses were performed using an innovative technique and an appropriate management of endometriosis. A hysteroscopy was later performed and showed anastomotic patency. As a result, the patient has been experiencing spontaneous regular menstruation for nine months.
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, I Argay
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5224 views
311 likes
0 comments
42:42
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
Role of laparoscopy in treating ovarian cancer
Borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) represent about 10 to 20% of all ovarian malignancies and differ from invasive ovarian cancers (IOCs) by many characters. The standard management of BOT is peritoneal washing cytology, hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, complete peritoneal resection of macroscopic lesions; in case of mucinous BOTs, appendectomy should be performed. Because BOTs are often diagnosed at an earlier stage, in younger women and have a better prognosis and a higher survival rate than IOCs, fertility-sparing surgery is one of the options to preserve a childbearing capacity. However, conservative surgery is still controversial.
So far, postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormone therapy are not recommended. BOTs are characteristically difficult to diagnose using preoperative radiological methods, exhibit inconsistencies in expression of tumor markers, and are often inaccurately identified using frozen sections. In these slides, Dr. Marco Puga will discuss the controversial issues of BOTs and will present the management of BOTs.
M Puga
Lecture
2 years ago
2717 views
167 likes
0 comments
31:15
Role of laparoscopy in treating ovarian cancer
Borderline ovarian tumors (BOTs) represent about 10 to 20% of all ovarian malignancies and differ from invasive ovarian cancers (IOCs) by many characters. The standard management of BOT is peritoneal washing cytology, hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, omentectomy, complete peritoneal resection of macroscopic lesions; in case of mucinous BOTs, appendectomy should be performed. Because BOTs are often diagnosed at an earlier stage, in younger women and have a better prognosis and a higher survival rate than IOCs, fertility-sparing surgery is one of the options to preserve a childbearing capacity. However, conservative surgery is still controversial.
So far, postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormone therapy are not recommended. BOTs are characteristically difficult to diagnose using preoperative radiological methods, exhibit inconsistencies in expression of tumor markers, and are often inaccurately identified using frozen sections. In these slides, Dr. Marco Puga will discuss the controversial issues of BOTs and will present the management of BOTs.
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers (update of April 2012 lecture)
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. In the majority of patients, the disease will present at an early stage, without metastasis, and with an excellent prognosis.
Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without a lymph node dissection is the standard method in the management of endometrial cancer. Although the rate of metastasis in patients with early stage endometrial cancer is low, the standard of treatment still includes a complete or selective pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy for staging, resulting in detrimental side-effects, including lower extremity lymphedema. SLN mapping is based on the concept that lymph node metastasis is the result of an orderly process, that is, the lymph drains in a specific pattern away from the tumor, and therefore if the SLN, or first node, is negative for metastasis, then the nodes after the SLN should also be negative. Among gynecological cancers, a variety of methods have been described to detect a sentinel node in situ including colored dyes and radioisotopes, the latter requiring a specialized gamma detection probe. In this key presentation, Dr. Querleu will talk about the SNL technique in uterine cancers.
D Querleu
Lecture
2 years ago
1449 views
131 likes
0 comments
34:36
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers (update of April 2012 lecture)
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. In the majority of patients, the disease will present at an early stage, without metastasis, and with an excellent prognosis.
Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without a lymph node dissection is the standard method in the management of endometrial cancer. Although the rate of metastasis in patients with early stage endometrial cancer is low, the standard of treatment still includes a complete or selective pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy for staging, resulting in detrimental side-effects, including lower extremity lymphedema. SLN mapping is based on the concept that lymph node metastasis is the result of an orderly process, that is, the lymph drains in a specific pattern away from the tumor, and therefore if the SLN, or first node, is negative for metastasis, then the nodes after the SLN should also be negative. Among gynecological cancers, a variety of methods have been described to detect a sentinel node in situ including colored dyes and radioisotopes, the latter requiring a specialized gamma detection probe. In this key presentation, Dr. Querleu will talk about the SNL technique in uterine cancers.
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
F Kridelka
Lecture
2 years ago
1428 views
123 likes
0 comments
27:54
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
Endometrial cancer surgical indications
The surgical management of endometrial cancer has been markedly changed by minimally invasive techniques. After three decades of laparoscopy, robotic surgery has built upon and expanded the population of patients able to benefit from minimally invasive techniques. Updates in the field of laparoscopy continue, including single site surgery. The emergence and rapid uptake of robotics continues to produce favorable outcomes while simultaneously expanding minimal access surgery to the obese and elderly populations. Sentinel lymph node detection and single port surgery are expanding areas which will continue to push the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in endometrial cancer. In this key lecture, Dr. Querleu will discuss the role of MIS in the management of endometrial cancer.
D Querleu
Lecture
2 years ago
1404 views
102 likes
0 comments
29:34
Endometrial cancer surgical indications
The surgical management of endometrial cancer has been markedly changed by minimally invasive techniques. After three decades of laparoscopy, robotic surgery has built upon and expanded the population of patients able to benefit from minimally invasive techniques. Updates in the field of laparoscopy continue, including single site surgery. The emergence and rapid uptake of robotics continues to produce favorable outcomes while simultaneously expanding minimal access surgery to the obese and elderly populations. Sentinel lymph node detection and single port surgery are expanding areas which will continue to push the role of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) in endometrial cancer. In this key lecture, Dr. Querleu will discuss the role of MIS in the management of endometrial cancer.
Combining VATS and laparoscopic approach in the resection of ovarian carcinoma metastasis
This is the case of a 64-year-old woman with a history of hysterectomy and left adnexectomy. In 2012, a vaginal ultrasound revealed a right ovarian mass diagnosed as a right ovarian cancer. In December 2012, she underwent a right adnexectomy with pelvic, lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy and omentectomy. Final pathological staging of the ovarian cystadenocarcinoma was pT3cpN1Mx (IIIC). She completed 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel. During the follow-up exam, the patient remained symptom-free and presented with a stable perihepatic lesion. In 2015, two new lesions were found on CT-scan: one in the anterior mediastinum (14mm) and another in the abdominal diaphragm in contact with a liver segment VIII (19mm). In addition, CA 125 raised from 19 to 50kU/L. PET-scan only evidenced these two new lesions (SUV= 10). Taking into account the patient’s excellent performance status, long disease-free survival, stability of lesions, with CT-scans performed with a 3-month interval, and the possibility of video-assisted surgery, it was decided to use VATS and laparoscopy to remove the lesions. Final pathological findings showed ovarian cystadenocarcinoma metastases in 2 lesions (R0). The third perihepatic lesion was a cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
F Cabral, JA Pereira, P Calvinho, P Amado, R Maio
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2741 views
91 likes
0 comments
11:33
Combining VATS and laparoscopic approach in the resection of ovarian carcinoma metastasis
This is the case of a 64-year-old woman with a history of hysterectomy and left adnexectomy. In 2012, a vaginal ultrasound revealed a right ovarian mass diagnosed as a right ovarian cancer. In December 2012, she underwent a right adnexectomy with pelvic, lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy and omentectomy. Final pathological staging of the ovarian cystadenocarcinoma was pT3cpN1Mx (IIIC). She completed 6 cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel. During the follow-up exam, the patient remained symptom-free and presented with a stable perihepatic lesion. In 2015, two new lesions were found on CT-scan: one in the anterior mediastinum (14mm) and another in the abdominal diaphragm in contact with a liver segment VIII (19mm). In addition, CA 125 raised from 19 to 50kU/L. PET-scan only evidenced these two new lesions (SUV= 10). Taking into account the patient’s excellent performance status, long disease-free survival, stability of lesions, with CT-scans performed with a 3-month interval, and the possibility of video-assisted surgery, it was decided to use VATS and laparoscopy to remove the lesions. Final pathological findings showed ovarian cystadenocarcinoma metastases in 2 lesions (R0). The third perihepatic lesion was a cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
Sutures transfixing bladder as a complication of laparoscopic burch colposuspension
Laparoscopic Burch colposuspension may be difficult in cases of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) associated with large lateral cystocele. In these cases, complications may occur. However, they are rare.
This video shows the cystoscopic treatment of intravesical adhesions, secondary to sutures transfixing the bladder during the Burch laparoscopic procedure and lateral suspension, without perioperative use of control cystoscopy. An office cystoscopy was performed after the operation, nine months later, because of gradual onset of entirely isolated pelvic pain at the end of urination. It showed intravesical synechia as bilateral pillars. The different steps of the operation are the following:
1) Diagnostic laparoscopy with a good status of the lateral suspension without mesh migration.
2) Operative laparoscopy with opening of Retzius’s space, dissection, adhesiolysis, and division of the non-absorbable sutures of the past colposuspension in order to mobilize the bladder, followed by reperitonization of Retzius’s space.
3) Diagnostic cystoscopy confirming adhesions as bilateral pillars, laterally to the trigone with normal ejaculation of both ureteral ostia.
4) Operative cystoscopy after catheterization of both ureters: division of the pillars with the monopolar electrode without visualization of the Burch sutures, as they probably migrated upward in the first postoperative months.
In the postoperative period, ureteral catheters are removed 48 hours after surgery. Pain resolves completely during urination. Normal kidneys and ureters are observed at ultrasound.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages related to the routine use of cystoscopy at the end of the laparoscopic Burch procedure, especially in cases of large lateral cystocele.
JB Dubuisson, J Dubuisson, JM Wenger, A Caviezel
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2331 views
95 likes
0 comments
07:41
Sutures transfixing bladder as a complication of laparoscopic burch colposuspension
Laparoscopic Burch colposuspension may be difficult in cases of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) associated with large lateral cystocele. In these cases, complications may occur. However, they are rare.
This video shows the cystoscopic treatment of intravesical adhesions, secondary to sutures transfixing the bladder during the Burch laparoscopic procedure and lateral suspension, without perioperative use of control cystoscopy. An office cystoscopy was performed after the operation, nine months later, because of gradual onset of entirely isolated pelvic pain at the end of urination. It showed intravesical synechia as bilateral pillars. The different steps of the operation are the following:
1) Diagnostic laparoscopy with a good status of the lateral suspension without mesh migration.
2) Operative laparoscopy with opening of Retzius’s space, dissection, adhesiolysis, and division of the non-absorbable sutures of the past colposuspension in order to mobilize the bladder, followed by reperitonization of Retzius’s space.
3) Diagnostic cystoscopy confirming adhesions as bilateral pillars, laterally to the trigone with normal ejaculation of both ureteral ostia.
4) Operative cystoscopy after catheterization of both ureters: division of the pillars with the monopolar electrode without visualization of the Burch sutures, as they probably migrated upward in the first postoperative months.
In the postoperative period, ureteral catheters are removed 48 hours after surgery. Pain resolves completely during urination. Normal kidneys and ureters are observed at ultrasound.
This video clearly demonstrates the advantages related to the routine use of cystoscopy at the end of the laparoscopic Burch procedure, especially in cases of large lateral cystocele.