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Totally laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for stage II (cT3 cN0 cM0) advanced gastric carcinoma
A 54-year-old female patient with a past medical history of hypertension presented with abdominal pain and an episode of coffee ground emesis. Symptoms of pain and vomiting started approximately two to three months before admission and began to worsen over the past month. The pain was relieved by food. The patient also admitted to unspecified weight loss over the same period of time. On physical examination, mild distension of the abdomen was observed with a mild to moderate tenderness to palpation involving epigastric tenderness. An endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract (EGD) revealed a gastric ulcer extending to the lower part of the stomach. No active bleeding was observed at the site. Gastric outlet obstruction was also noted with an inflamed edematous pylorus. Biopsy revealed a moderately differentiated gastric carcinoma. Staging CT-scan imaging studies revealed no sites of metastasis. The patient was diagnosed with stage II (cT3 cN0 cM0) advanced gastric carcinoma according to the Japanese classification of gastric carcinoma. The patient was then taken to the operating room for laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy. The operation time was 220 minutes. No further evidence of intra-abdominal disease or liver involvement was observed. The patient did well postoperatively and was subsequently discharged home on postoperative day 7. No metastatic lymph nodes / twenty-two regional lymph nodes were found; so the pathological findings confirmed stage II. The patient is disease-free at 12 months.
Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma - 2nd English Edition. Gastric Cancer 1998;1:10-24.
G Pignata, U Bracale, M Barone, F Perna, P Becchi
Surgical intervention
9 years ago
6850 views
74 likes
0 comments
25:53
Totally laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy for stage II (cT3 cN0 cM0) advanced gastric carcinoma
A 54-year-old female patient with a past medical history of hypertension presented with abdominal pain and an episode of coffee ground emesis. Symptoms of pain and vomiting started approximately two to three months before admission and began to worsen over the past month. The pain was relieved by food. The patient also admitted to unspecified weight loss over the same period of time. On physical examination, mild distension of the abdomen was observed with a mild to moderate tenderness to palpation involving epigastric tenderness. An endoscopy of the upper gastrointestinal tract (EGD) revealed a gastric ulcer extending to the lower part of the stomach. No active bleeding was observed at the site. Gastric outlet obstruction was also noted with an inflamed edematous pylorus. Biopsy revealed a moderately differentiated gastric carcinoma. Staging CT-scan imaging studies revealed no sites of metastasis. The patient was diagnosed with stage II (cT3 cN0 cM0) advanced gastric carcinoma according to the Japanese classification of gastric carcinoma. The patient was then taken to the operating room for laparoscopic subtotal gastrectomy with D2 lymphadenectomy. The operation time was 220 minutes. No further evidence of intra-abdominal disease or liver involvement was observed. The patient did well postoperatively and was subsequently discharged home on postoperative day 7. No metastatic lymph nodes / twenty-two regional lymph nodes were found; so the pathological findings confirmed stage II. The patient is disease-free at 12 months.
Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma - 2nd English Edition. Gastric Cancer 1998;1:10-24.
Perigastric band abscess: laparoscopic approach
Band infection after gastric banding is a relatively rare complication. In most cases, it manifests itself through abdominal pain associated with fever, and/or an abscess surrounding the access port. This is the case of a 37-year-old female patient in whom a gastric band was placed 5 years ago. The patient lost 60% of her excess weight; however, she complained that the gastric band was no longer as efficient. Imaging studies allowed to identify the existence of a 50mL supragastric pouch. A gastroscopy reveals nothing unusual.
Following this postoperative control, we decided to remove the patient’s gastric band as she was troubled by the superior gastric pouch.
M Vix, F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
235 views
23 likes
0 comments
06:13
Perigastric band abscess: laparoscopic approach
Band infection after gastric banding is a relatively rare complication. In most cases, it manifests itself through abdominal pain associated with fever, and/or an abscess surrounding the access port. This is the case of a 37-year-old female patient in whom a gastric band was placed 5 years ago. The patient lost 60% of her excess weight; however, she complained that the gastric band was no longer as efficient. Imaging studies allowed to identify the existence of a 50mL supragastric pouch. A gastroscopy reveals nothing unusual.
Following this postoperative control, we decided to remove the patient’s gastric band as she was troubled by the superior gastric pouch.
Collis Nissen for slipped fundoplication with recurrent GERD symptoms
Hiatal hernia recurrence is a dreaded postoperative complication after surgery for gastroesophageal reflux. This video presents a live surgery performed in a patient presenting with recurrent symptoms and dysphagia after a previous Nissen fundoplication that was performed 5 years ago. All the preoperative work-up demonstrates the recurrent reflux, mixed ascites, and alkaline reflux associated with an intrathoracic migration of the proximal stomach, and probably a slippage of the valve on the upper part of the stomach. This patient has a manometry, which confirmed the weakness of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) associated with some dysmotility disorders in the lower esophagus.
B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
1911 views
15 likes
0 comments
17:24
Collis Nissen for slipped fundoplication with recurrent GERD symptoms
Hiatal hernia recurrence is a dreaded postoperative complication after surgery for gastroesophageal reflux. This video presents a live surgery performed in a patient presenting with recurrent symptoms and dysphagia after a previous Nissen fundoplication that was performed 5 years ago. All the preoperative work-up demonstrates the recurrent reflux, mixed ascites, and alkaline reflux associated with an intrathoracic migration of the proximal stomach, and probably a slippage of the valve on the upper part of the stomach. This patient has a manometry, which confirmed the weakness of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) associated with some dysmotility disorders in the lower esophagus.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy for pT2 N0 M0 adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach
Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer remains limited because of technical problems, expecially for lymphadenectomy. We present the case of a 75-year-old patient with no specific history in which an adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach was found. An endoscopic ultrasound had shown a UST3 N0 lesion. The CT-scan confirmed the absence of secondary lesion and a neoadjuvant chemotherapy was carried out. Following chemotherapy, a re-evaluation was performed and confirmed the 2 by 2cm lesion of the lesser curvature of the stomach without secondary lesion. The decision to perform a laparoscopic total gastrectomy was made.
B Dallemagne, F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
7656 views
25 likes
0 comments
15:53
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy for pT2 N0 M0 adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach
Totally laparoscopic gastrectomy for cancer remains limited because of technical problems, expecially for lymphadenectomy. We present the case of a 75-year-old patient with no specific history in which an adenocarcinoma of the lesser curvature of the stomach was found. An endoscopic ultrasound had shown a UST3 N0 lesion. The CT-scan confirmed the absence of secondary lesion and a neoadjuvant chemotherapy was carried out. Following chemotherapy, a re-evaluation was performed and confirmed the 2 by 2cm lesion of the lesser curvature of the stomach without secondary lesion. The decision to perform a laparoscopic total gastrectomy was made.
Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS): gastric banding removal for acute gastric pouch dilatation
In a significantly short time, Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) for morbid obesity has become a common operation in Europe and elsewhere.
Recent series show a high percentage of patients re-operated on, almost always with excision of the banding system. The reasons for re-operation are esophagitis, band erosion, pouch dilatation, leakage from the balloon, and esophageal dilatation.
This video demonstrates the removal of a gastric band for acute gastric pouch dilatation. The procedure was completed using a single access technique, with conventional laparoscopic instrumentation. A 2cm incision is performed on the port site and the same one is removed first maintaining the connection tube on site in order to place traction on the band. A 10mm port is inserted using an open technique, and two further 5mm ports are placed anteriorly just to the left and to the right side of the previous one.
N Perrotta, A Cappiello, C Giudicianni, N Andriulo, T Marinelli, D Loffredo
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
2946 views
9 likes
0 comments
06:06
Single Incision Laparoscopic Surgery (SILS): gastric banding removal for acute gastric pouch dilatation
In a significantly short time, Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding (LAGB) for morbid obesity has become a common operation in Europe and elsewhere.
Recent series show a high percentage of patients re-operated on, almost always with excision of the banding system. The reasons for re-operation are esophagitis, band erosion, pouch dilatation, leakage from the balloon, and esophageal dilatation.
This video demonstrates the removal of a gastric band for acute gastric pouch dilatation. The procedure was completed using a single access technique, with conventional laparoscopic instrumentation. A 2cm incision is performed on the port site and the same one is removed first maintaining the connection tube on site in order to place traction on the band. A 10mm port is inserted using an open technique, and two further 5mm ports are placed anteriorly just to the left and to the right side of the previous one.
Unusual cause of new onset persistent dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication
Persistent troublesome dysphagia develops in a small percentage of patients after Nissen fundoplication. Mild transient solid food dysphagia is an unavoidable side-effect of the operation. However, severe persistent dysphagia is probably related to poor patient selection, inadequate preoperative evaluation or technical errors, in most cases, excessively tight or long fundoplication. If dysphagia persists after dilatation, an outflow obstruction different to too tight or too long a wrap should be suspected as in this case. Re-operation may be needed if evidence of a poorly constructed wrap is apparent during the evaluation.
B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 years ago
627 views
35 likes
0 comments
18:38
Unusual cause of new onset persistent dysphagia after Nissen fundoplication
Persistent troublesome dysphagia develops in a small percentage of patients after Nissen fundoplication. Mild transient solid food dysphagia is an unavoidable side-effect of the operation. However, severe persistent dysphagia is probably related to poor patient selection, inadequate preoperative evaluation or technical errors, in most cases, excessively tight or long fundoplication. If dysphagia persists after dilatation, an outflow obstruction different to too tight or too long a wrap should be suspected as in this case. Re-operation may be needed if evidence of a poorly constructed wrap is apparent during the evaluation.