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Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair for unilateral inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient
In this video, we present the case of a left-sided unilateral indirect inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient. Treatment was performed using the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair technique. The hernia sac was promptly identified and dissected without any concern to cord structures since the patient was a female. The herniotomy was performed with an Endoloop®. The only constraints of surgery were limited operating space and ergonomic handling of instruments. The patient was discharged in the evening of surgery and wounds healed within a week. Postoperative follow-up after 6 months revealed excellent cosmesis and a complete absence of hernia on the operated site. Mini laparoscopic instruments can also be used to improve surgical cosmesis and ensure same day discharge without any postoperative sequelae.
KB Kaundinya
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1290 views
5 likes
0 comments
03:35
Laparoscopic TEP hernia repair for unilateral inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient
In this video, we present the case of a left-sided unilateral indirect inguinal hernia in the canal of Nuck in a 7-year-old female patient. Treatment was performed using the laparoscopic TEP inguinal hernia repair technique. The hernia sac was promptly identified and dissected without any concern to cord structures since the patient was a female. The herniotomy was performed with an Endoloop®. The only constraints of surgery were limited operating space and ergonomic handling of instruments. The patient was discharged in the evening of surgery and wounds healed within a week. Postoperative follow-up after 6 months revealed excellent cosmesis and a complete absence of hernia on the operated site. Mini laparoscopic instruments can also be used to improve surgical cosmesis and ensure same day discharge without any postoperative sequelae.
Complex cases in laparoscopic recurrent and incisional hernia repair: multi-recurrence, infections, fistulas, difficult abdomen
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
11323 views
4 likes
0 comments
03:00
Complex cases in laparoscopic recurrent and incisional hernia repair: multi-recurrence, infections, fistulas, difficult abdomen
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
Recurrent and incisional hernia repair: complex cases
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
State of the art
10 months ago
3048 views
17 likes
0 comments
00:00
Recurrent and incisional hernia repair: complex cases
The term ‘‘complex (abdominal wall) hernia’’ is often used by general surgeons and other specialists working in the abdomen to describe abdominal wall hernias which are technically challenging and time-consuming.

Four categories were created to classify and discuss the criteria, which were proposed to be included in the definition of ‘‘complex abdominal wall hernia’’: defect size and location, patient history and risk factors, contamination and soft tissue condition, and clinical scenario.
Defect size is an important variable; increased size is a risk factor for 30-day readmission rate and recurrence.
Wound contamination is usually classified according to the US National Research Council Group including clean, clean-contaminated, contaminated, and dirty/infected. It is well-known that contamination and subsequent infection are an important cause of wound dehiscence and reherniation which impair wound healing dynamics.
A recurrent hernia is considered a risk factor for a new recurrence.
Patient status is an important factor. Conditions such as abnormal collagen type I/type III ratio and genetic connective tissue disorders are associated with an increased risk of herniation. Older age, male gender, chronic pulmonary disease, coughing, ascites, jaundice, anemia, emergency surgery, wound infection, obesity, steroid use, hypoalbuminemia, hypertension, perioperative shock are also important risk factors.

The reported incidence of incisional hernia is about 2 to 11% after all laparotomies.
The ideal repair for an abdominal incisional hernia is to restore the anatomical and physiological integrity of the abdominal wall by reconstructing the midline. However, 30 to 50% of defects larger than 6cm recur after primary closure.
The insertion of a synthetic mesh helps to decrease or relieve tension on the suture line and can reduce the incidence of recurrence to 10% or less.
But foreign prosthetic materials have been associated with a high risk of complications such as protrusion, extrusion, infection, and intestinal fistulization.
Laparoscopic repair has provided further improvements with lower infection rates, shorter hospital stay, and a reduction in recurrence with rates of 4 to 16% in recent studies.
In this topic addressing complex laparoscopic cases, we show different scenarios including recurrent infected incisional hernia, fistulization, multi-recurrent incisional hernia, migration, and conversion.
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
S Morales-Conde, T Urade, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5722 views
20 likes
2 comments
42:53
Left iliac fossa incisional hernia: live laparoscopic repair
Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents the clinical case of a 59-year old female patient managed for an incisional hernia with a 6-7cm sac in the left lower quadrant. The patient’s history included a left iliac fossa laparotomy to control bleeding caused by an epigastric artery injury following a laparoscopic appendectomy. The patient was placed in a Trendelenburg position. An optical port and two 5mm operating ports were inserted on the right lateral side of the abdomen. Peritoneal dissection was performed to expose anatomical landmarks including pubic bone, iliac crest, and iliac vessels for proper mesh fixation. The defect of the abdominal wall was closed using a continuous suture. A trimmed mesh (Parietex™ Composite Mesh) was inserted and fixed with tackers to Cooper’s ligament, to the iliac crest, and to the abdominal wall to sufficiently cover the sutured defect. Finally, the preperitoneal flap was fixed on the mesh to prevent intestines from getting into the mesh gap.
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
D Mutter, T Urade, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
12581 views
81 likes
0 comments
46:18
Laparoscopic TAPP approach to bilateral reducible inguinal hernia: live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 57-year old male patient managed for a bilateral reducible inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a right inguinal hernia repair in his childhood. A first port was inserted 1cm above the umbilicus and two 5mm ports were placed 7cm away from the umbilicus on the right and left side. Peritoneal dissection starts with a horizontal incision and parietalization is performed carefully to avoid injury to the vessels and deferent duct. After the myopectineal orifice has been sufficiently exposed, polypropylene meshes (Parietene™) trimmed to a 13 by 12cm size are inserted into the preperitoneal cavity and fixed using absorbable tacks. Finally, the meshes are fully covered using peritoneal flaps.
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
B Dallemagne, T Urade, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3273 views
29 likes
1 comment
39:46
Laparoscopic TEP unilateral inguinal hernia repair: a live interactive procedure
We present the clinical case of a 45-year old male patient managed for a right direct inguinal hernia. The patient’s history included a former approach for right inguinal hernia in his childhood and a laparoscopic left inguinal hernia repair. A first port was inserted below the umbilicus and access to the pubic bone was gained on the midline without using balloon. In this case, dissection of adhesions related to the previous operation was required. Attempts were made to identify anatomical landmarks after insertion of 5mm ports. The direct hernia content was dissected and reduced with blunt dissection. Once anatomical landmarks including pubic symphysis, Cooper’s ligament, epigastric vessels, spermatic cord, and psoas muscle were identified, a trimmed polypropylene mesh was inserted and the myopectineal orifice was sufficiently covered without fixation. Finally, the preperitoneal cavity was desufflated to complete the procedure.
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3574 views
16 likes
2 comments
08:23
Laparoscopic Spigelian hernia repair
Spigelian hernia is a rare condition and it is difficult to diagnose it clinically. It has been estimated to account for 0.12% of abdominal wall hernias. The hernia ring is a well-defined defect in the transversus abdominis aponeurosis. The hernia sac, surrounded with extraperitoneal adipose tissue, often lies interparietally passing through the transversus abdominis and the internal oblique muscle aponeuroses and then spreading out beneath the intact aponeurosis of the external oblique muscle. The laparoscopic repair is well-established. Most authors use a transperitoneal approach either by placing the mesh in an intraperitoneal position or by raising the peritoneal flap and placing the mesh in the extraperitoneal space. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic repair of a Spigelian hernia through the transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) placement of a composite mesh.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: left direct inguinal hernia: laparoscopic TAPP approach
We present the clinical case of a 50-year-old patient managed for a left direct symptomatic reducible inguinal hernia, with a palpable impulse on examination. The patient’s history included a left indirect inguinal hernia repair in his childhood.

The procedure begins conventionally with an open laparoscopy with the introduction of a supra-umbilical port. The exploration confirms the presence of a left hernia and rules out the diagnosis of right hernia. Dissection starts with a horizontal peritoneal incision, which allows to progressively parietalize all elements of the cord, making sure to stay in contact with the peritoneum. Dissection of the previously operated hernia dating back to the patient’s childhood is slightly more painstaking and constraining due to the presence of adhesion-related scars. However, the parietalization of the peritoneum is carried on without any particular problem, and considering that it is a direct hernia, the deferent duct is very easily identified and parietalized. Reduction of the direct hernia is performed easily with the reintroduction of the transversalis fascia. Given the small size of the hernia, the fascia will not be exteriorized.

After complete lowering, a 15 X 15cm polypropylene mesh (Parietene™) is recut to a 13 X 12cm size with external trimming. The mesh is positioned in order to cover all direct and internal hernial orifices. It is only fixed to Cooper’s ligament, to the anterior superior iliac spine, and to the anterior abdominal wall so as to prevent any early mobilization postoperatively. Reperitonization is then performed with peritoneal fixation using absorbable staples (of the AbsorbaTack™ type). Exsufflation is achieved under visual guidance.

The entire procedure is performed as an outpatient surgery. The patient was admitted to our unit just before the intervention. He is discharged a few hours later.
D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
23893 views
1430 likes
1 comment
25:14
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: left direct inguinal hernia: laparoscopic TAPP approach
We present the clinical case of a 50-year-old patient managed for a left direct symptomatic reducible inguinal hernia, with a palpable impulse on examination. The patient’s history included a left indirect inguinal hernia repair in his childhood.

The procedure begins conventionally with an open laparoscopy with the introduction of a supra-umbilical port. The exploration confirms the presence of a left hernia and rules out the diagnosis of right hernia. Dissection starts with a horizontal peritoneal incision, which allows to progressively parietalize all elements of the cord, making sure to stay in contact with the peritoneum. Dissection of the previously operated hernia dating back to the patient’s childhood is slightly more painstaking and constraining due to the presence of adhesion-related scars. However, the parietalization of the peritoneum is carried on without any particular problem, and considering that it is a direct hernia, the deferent duct is very easily identified and parietalized. Reduction of the direct hernia is performed easily with the reintroduction of the transversalis fascia. Given the small size of the hernia, the fascia will not be exteriorized.

After complete lowering, a 15 X 15cm polypropylene mesh (Parietene™) is recut to a 13 X 12cm size with external trimming. The mesh is positioned in order to cover all direct and internal hernial orifices. It is only fixed to Cooper’s ligament, to the anterior superior iliac spine, and to the anterior abdominal wall so as to prevent any early mobilization postoperatively. Reperitonization is then performed with peritoneal fixation using absorbable staples (of the AbsorbaTack™ type). Exsufflation is achieved under visual guidance.

The entire procedure is performed as an outpatient surgery. The patient was admitted to our unit just before the intervention. He is discharged a few hours later.
Transumbilical single-access laparoscopic subxiphoidal incisional hernia repair
Background: In this video, the authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who consulted for a subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery. A transumbilical single access laparoscopic repair was proposed.

Video: The umbilical scar was incised and, after having placed a fascial umbilical purse-string suture, an 11mm reusable trocar was introduced. DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were introduced. The subxiphoidal hernia was put in evidence. The fatty tissue covering the defect was freed and the hernia defect was measured to be 8cm cranio-caudally and 6cm latero-laterally. A dual face mesh of 15 and 14cm (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical, Saint-Etienne, France) was chosen and introduced into the cavity through the 11mm trocar. The mesh was fixed against the abdominal wall using absorbable tacks (Sorbafix, Bard Davol Inc., Warwick, RI, US), and against the pericardial sheet using a polypropylene suture, in order to prevent any potential cardiac tamponade.

Results: The final umbilical scar was 15mm. Operative time was 65 minutes, and operative bleeding was insignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. At visit consultations, no recurrence was evidenced.

Conclusion: Subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery can be treated successfully using a transumbilical single access laparoscopy.
G Dapri, A Cadenas Febres, L Cardinali, SH Sondji, I Surdeanu, GB Cadière
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1609 views
135 likes
0 comments
06:30
Transumbilical single-access laparoscopic subxiphoidal incisional hernia repair
Background: In this video, the authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who consulted for a subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery. A transumbilical single access laparoscopic repair was proposed.

Video: The umbilical scar was incised and, after having placed a fascial umbilical purse-string suture, an 11mm reusable trocar was introduced. DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were introduced. The subxiphoidal hernia was put in evidence. The fatty tissue covering the defect was freed and the hernia defect was measured to be 8cm cranio-caudally and 6cm latero-laterally. A dual face mesh of 15 and 14cm (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical, Saint-Etienne, France) was chosen and introduced into the cavity through the 11mm trocar. The mesh was fixed against the abdominal wall using absorbable tacks (Sorbafix, Bard Davol Inc., Warwick, RI, US), and against the pericardial sheet using a polypropylene suture, in order to prevent any potential cardiac tamponade.

Results: The final umbilical scar was 15mm. Operative time was 65 minutes, and operative bleeding was insignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. At visit consultations, no recurrence was evidenced.

Conclusion: Subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery can be treated successfully using a transumbilical single access laparoscopy.