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Laparoscopic central pancreatectomy for renal cell carcinoma metastasis
Authors present the case of a laparoscopic central pancreatectomy in a patient with a clear cell renal cell carcinoma metastatic lesion to the pancreatic neck.
A 71-year old female patient was admitted with a pancreatic neck lesion detected by abdominal ultrasound performed for mild epigastric pain she has been suffering from for 3 months prior to admission. Her past medical history is significant for right nephrectomy performed 25 years ago. The patient stated that she had an acquired cystic kidney disease, but no medical records were available to confirm that. A multidisciplinary investigation was performed. Pancreatic protocol CT-scan revealed a 2.5cm hyper-enhancing round-shaped tumor, located within the pancreatic neck. The patient had no carcinoid syndrome, and levels of PNET specific markers (Chromogranin A, NSE, Insulin, 5-HIIA) were not elevated. CA 19-9 and CEA levels were also normal. The tumor was [111In]-octreotide negative on octreotide scan. As a result, a non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor was suspected considering its CT-scan characteristics.
A laparoscopic pancreatic enucleation was planned with possible central pancreatectomy in case the enucleation would turn out to be unfeasible. The attempt to perform enucleation failed due to intensive bleeding from an intrapancreatic vessel, unclear borders of the tumor, and high risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula formation. It was decided to continue the surgery with central pancreatectomy.
The postoperative course was complicated by a postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) grade B (according to the ISGPF classification), which was managed successfully using interventional percutaneous drainage. Final histopathological examination revealed a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastatic lesion to the pancreas. A CT-scan performed 2 years after the surgery revealed no signs of disease progression. The pancreaticojejunostomy shows no signs of obstruction. The patient has neither exocrine nor endocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
The purpose of the video is to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic central pancreatectomy, which is an organ-preserving procedure and is accompanied with better long-term results.
P Agami, M Baychorov, R Izrailov, I Khatkov
Surgical intervention
6 days ago
156 views
7 likes
0 comments
13:07
Laparoscopic central pancreatectomy for renal cell carcinoma metastasis
Authors present the case of a laparoscopic central pancreatectomy in a patient with a clear cell renal cell carcinoma metastatic lesion to the pancreatic neck.
A 71-year old female patient was admitted with a pancreatic neck lesion detected by abdominal ultrasound performed for mild epigastric pain she has been suffering from for 3 months prior to admission. Her past medical history is significant for right nephrectomy performed 25 years ago. The patient stated that she had an acquired cystic kidney disease, but no medical records were available to confirm that. A multidisciplinary investigation was performed. Pancreatic protocol CT-scan revealed a 2.5cm hyper-enhancing round-shaped tumor, located within the pancreatic neck. The patient had no carcinoid syndrome, and levels of PNET specific markers (Chromogranin A, NSE, Insulin, 5-HIIA) were not elevated. CA 19-9 and CEA levels were also normal. The tumor was [111In]-octreotide negative on octreotide scan. As a result, a non-functioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor was suspected considering its CT-scan characteristics.
A laparoscopic pancreatic enucleation was planned with possible central pancreatectomy in case the enucleation would turn out to be unfeasible. The attempt to perform enucleation failed due to intensive bleeding from an intrapancreatic vessel, unclear borders of the tumor, and high risk of postoperative pancreatic fistula formation. It was decided to continue the surgery with central pancreatectomy.
The postoperative course was complicated by a postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) grade B (according to the ISGPF classification), which was managed successfully using interventional percutaneous drainage. Final histopathological examination revealed a clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) metastatic lesion to the pancreas. A CT-scan performed 2 years after the surgery revealed no signs of disease progression. The pancreaticojejunostomy shows no signs of obstruction. The patient has neither exocrine nor endocrine pancreatic insufficiency.
The purpose of the video is to demonstrate the feasibility of laparoscopic central pancreatectomy, which is an organ-preserving procedure and is accompanied with better long-term results.
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy is an alternative to open surgery, which offers equivalent oncological results with a faster recovery associated with the minimally invasive approach. In cases of venous invasion, laparoscopic reconstruction with graft interposition is technically demanding. Nevertheless, good results can be achieved. This is the case of a 79-year-old man who was evaluated for jaundice. CT-scan found a tumor in the head of the pancreas with a 180-degree infiltration of the portal vein. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy with volumetric shrinking, but persistence of venous infiltration, a laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction was decided upon.
E Giordano, A Alcaraz, S Reimondez, M Marani, W Salinas, R Pereyra, F Signorini, M Maraschio, L Obeide
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1881 views
20 likes
1 comment
08:05
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction
Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy is an alternative to open surgery, which offers equivalent oncological results with a faster recovery associated with the minimally invasive approach. In cases of venous invasion, laparoscopic reconstruction with graft interposition is technically demanding. Nevertheless, good results can be achieved. This is the case of a 79-year-old man who was evaluated for jaundice. CT-scan found a tumor in the head of the pancreas with a 180-degree infiltration of the portal vein. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy with volumetric shrinking, but persistence of venous infiltration, a laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy with venous reconstruction was decided upon.
Spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy
A 68-year-old woman was referred to us for multiple pancreatic cysts incidentally discovered on a routine ultrasound. An MRI was performed showing multiple cystic tumors throughout the pancreas, the largest of which was 15mm. This led to a suspicion of multifocal, side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), with minimal dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. An echo-endoscopy was subsequently performed indicating the presence of a multifocal IPMN. A fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was performed during this procedure, with aspiration of cystic content which was sent for CEA analysis and cytology. Cytology was compatible with a mucinous neoplasm with mild atypia and CEA at 98 IU/mL.
A spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy was proposed. The procedure was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. Pathology revealed a 19mm IPMN, with severe dysplasia and 3 foci of micro-invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of 1mm - pT1N0R0.
H Cristino, M Almeida, V Gomes, J Costa Maia
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
892 views
9 likes
2 comments
07:41
Spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy
A 68-year-old woman was referred to us for multiple pancreatic cysts incidentally discovered on a routine ultrasound. An MRI was performed showing multiple cystic tumors throughout the pancreas, the largest of which was 15mm. This led to a suspicion of multifocal, side-branch intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN), with minimal dilatation of the main pancreatic duct. An echo-endoscopy was subsequently performed indicating the presence of a multifocal IPMN. A fine-needle aspiration (FNA) was performed during this procedure, with aspiration of cystic content which was sent for CEA analysis and cytology. Cytology was compatible with a mucinous neoplasm with mild atypia and CEA at 98 IU/mL.
A spleen-preserving total laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy was proposed. The procedure was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. Pathology revealed a 19mm IPMN, with severe dysplasia and 3 foci of micro-invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of 1mm - pT1N0R0.
Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
P Agami, A Andrianov, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
2499 views
16 likes
3 comments
17:23
Laparoscopic Beger procedure with Roux-en-Y hepaticojejunostomy
This is the case of a 49-year-old male patient presenting with recurrent intractable abdominal pain. The patient had a history of obstructive jaundice and underwent biliary decompression provided by a percutaneous cholecystostomy. CT-scan showed signs of chronic pancreatitis, multiple stones in the pancreatic parenchyma, a compressed portal vein and biliary obstruction. The patient underwent a laparoscopic duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection (DPPHR) – a technique known as the Beger procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain, combined with portal and biliary compression caused by severe chronic pancreatitis. The surgical procedure preserves the stomach, the duodenum, and the biliary tree unlike standard duodenopancreatectomy (Whipple procedure), which is the other option for these patients. As Beger himself stated: “Preservation of the duodenum and the biliary system has major advantages for patients regarding short- and long-term outcome as compared to the Kausch-Whipple resection and pylorus-preserving resection”.
In this case, after completing the pancreatic head resection and fashioning the distal and proximal pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, a hepaticojejunostomy was performed. It was necessary due to the stenosis of the intrapancreatic segment of the common bile duct.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that the laparoscopic Beger procedure is safe and feasible, and provides all the well-known advantages of the minimally invasive approach, particularly lower postoperative pain, earlier functional recovery, and shorter hospital stay.
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
P Agami, A Andrianov, V Shchadrova, M Baychorov, R Izrailov
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5815 views
28 likes
4 comments
12:28
Laparoscopic Frey's procedure with management of intraoperative complication
This is the case of a 61-year-old lady presenting with recurrent abdominal intractable pain she has been suffering from for the last 7 years. Multi-slice CT (MSCT) revealed pancreatic calcifications from 1 to 5-8mm and dilatation of the main pancreatic duct in the body of the pancreas up to 4mm. The patient underwent laparoscopic local resection of the pancreatic head combined with a longitudinal Roux-en-Y pancreaticojejunostomy, a technique known as Frey's procedure. It is recognized as an effective therapeutic option for the surgical treatment of patients with persistent pain caused by chronic pancreatitis.
After fashioning the posterior wall of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis, we faced an intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb causing serious ischemia of the limb. We were forced to remove all previous sutures in order to untwist the Roux limb. The pancreaticojejunostomy was started anew afterwards.
The purpose of this video is to demonstrate that Frey's procedure can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion, which provides all the well-known advantages of this approach. We demonstrate that even a serious intraoperative complication such as a volvulus of the Roux limb can be managed without conversion. Our center has an experience of over 30 laparoscopic Frey's procedures. However, this is the first case where we encountered this complication and we believe this is an experience worth sharing.
Yet, we would like to underline that this approach should be used by highly skilled minimally invasive surgeons with an experience in intracorporeal suturing, which is the most challenging stage in Frey's procedure.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3988 views
7 likes
0 comments
13:26
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN)
This is the case of a 76-year-old female patient who was referred to our hospital because of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The patient has a medical history of renal insufficiency, sleep apnea syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), and hypertension. She has also a history of previous total hysterectomy.
MRI findings showed that the patient’s IPMN affected secondary pancreatic ducts entirely.
The main pancreatic duct is dilated, especially in the distal part at 6mm, but there are no remarkable findings of cystic wall thickening or intracystic nodules. A laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy was planned.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 8.
Pathological findings showed that the intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm was without any malignant component.
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
P Pessaux, E Felli, T Wakabayashi, Z Cherkaoui, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3064 views
6 likes
3 comments
07:01
Robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor
In this video, we show a robotic central pancreatectomy for a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. This is the case of a 50-year-old patient admitted to the emergency department for acute pancreatitis. CT-scan and MRI demonstrate the presence of a hypervascularized lesion of approximately 15mm in diameter, at the pancreatic isthmus. Scintigraphy does not evidence any intense uptake.
The colon and the omentum are detached and the stomach is suspended laparoscopically. The robot is docked using a lateral approach. A retropancreatic passage is achieved on the mesenteric-portal axis. An intraoperative ultrasonography is performed to visualize the tumor and delimitate the resection margins. After the dissection, the anastomosis is performed between the distal part of the pancreatic remnant and the posterior gastric wall.
A postoperative pancreatic fistula grade B was reported. It was successfully managed. The presence of a well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor was confirmed. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 22.
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
R Romito, L Portigliotti, G Bondonno, M Zacchero, A Volpe
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1864 views
12 likes
0 comments
13:28
Laparoscopic en bloc splenopancreatectomy with left adrenalectomy and para-aortic lymphadenectomy
The objective of this video is to present a surgical approach to a left adrenal mass caused by the invasion of a pancreatic lesion. A pulmonary lesion was also found. However, a preoperative biopsy of that lesion was impossible to perform. In order to distinguish the primary origin of this lung lesion, a laparoscopic ‘en bloc’ splenopancreatectomy combined with a left adrenalectomy and a para-aortic lymphadenectomy were planned.
Retrograde distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy is the standard procedure for cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas. In the literature, fewer studies describe the feasibility and the oncological safety of the laparoscopic approach.
This video aims to show the different operative steps of the procedure beginning with laparoscopic adrenalectomy followed by distal pancreatectomy and para-aortic lympadenectomy.
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
R Araujo, MA Sanctis, F Felippe, D Burgardt, D Wohnrath
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1885 views
6 likes
1 comment
08:04
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
F Freire Lisboa Junior, R de Lima França, A de Araujo Lima Liguori, AC de Medeiros Junior, M HSMP Tavares, F Medeiros de Azevedo, D Myller Barros Lima
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1250 views
6 likes
0 comments
14:36
Pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst: laparoscopic approach
This video shows the case of a 48-year-old male patient with a history of epigastric pain for 20 days, with the presence of nausea and vomiting but no self-reported fever. The patient was presented at the ER for examination. Computerized tomography (CT) scanning revealed a very rare case of pancreatic duplication associated with a gastric duplication cyst. He was referred to our service and then treated by laparoscopic route with partial gastrectomy and pancreatic resection (pancreas horn). On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient was discharged and allowed for free oral feeding. This is the second study in the literature reporting a case of laparoscopic resection of a gastric duplication cyst together with pancreatic resection. Of note, this is the first study in which the accessory pancreas communicates with the pancreatic head.
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
M Rui Martins, J Correia, D Jordão, S Martins, H Ferrão
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1821 views
9 likes
0 comments
20:59
Laparoscopic distal splenopancreatectomy for pancreatic cystadenoma: clockwise technique assisted with T’Lift device
Serous cystic neoplasm is a cystic neoplasm of the pancreas, which is increasingly detected at an asymptomatic stage. Serous cystadenomas are benign cystic tumors which occur more often in women than in men, and particularly in the seventh decade of life. Despite this, in the literature, three patients were reported to have malignant serous cystadenomas, with sizes greater than 7cm. The serous cystic neoplasm was confirmed by an imaging characteristic appearance, with multiple small or different-sized cysts, but when the diagnosis is doubtful, which often leads to surgery.
The clinical case is the one of a 79-year-old woman with a cystadenoma of the pancreas. She had a history of partial cystectomy for bladder neoplasia and recently (in 2017), she was submitted to laparoscopic focal cryotherapy for the treatment of a left unilateral renal tumor. At that time, she underwent a CT-can, which found a cystic neoplasm of the tail of the pancreas. A heterogeneous 5cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, near the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies highly suggestive of a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
In October 2018, in a follow-up CT-scan, there was an increase in size of the lesion (6.6cm) and a surgical resection was planned. A distal splenopancreatectomy using a clockwise technique was performed using the Signia™ stapling system with no complications. Histological examination confirmed a serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
JP Pinto, T Moreno, D Poletto, A Toscano, M Lozano
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2883 views
6 likes
0 comments
14:02
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy for a recurrent GIST
GISTs are tumors of the gastrointestinal stroma which, although rare, are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms of the digestive tract. They are most common in the stomach and small intestine, in patients aged between 50 and 70 years. The definitive diagnosis is established with immunohistochemistry (CD117), and the risk of postoperative recurrence should be estimated. Studies relate small intestine’s lesions with greater aggressiveness; however, more recent studies emphasize mitotic index and lesion size.
The clinical case is that of a 53-year-old woman with a stage TNM IIIb, AFIP 6b gastric GIST. In 2013, she underwent a sleeve gastrectomy followed by the daily administration of Imatinib (400mg). After 3 years of adjuvant therapy, she stopped treatment. In May 2017, in a follow-up CT-scan, a solid, heterogeneous 6.7cm lesion appeared in the left hypochondrium, separated from the metal suture, invading the lower pole of the spleen, with no evidence of adenopathies or free liquid.
Surgical resection was planned. A splenectomy with distal pancreatectomy, documented in the video, was performed with no complications. The histological examination confirmed a 5.8cm tumor implant, located in the splenic cord, compatible with GIST recurrence (>50 mitoses/50 fields, free margins, prognostic group 6b).
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, R Araujo
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5834 views
600 likes
1 comment
38:09
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection
We reported a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection for a mucinous cystic lesion. Four ports were positioned. The greater omentum was retracted to the superior part of the abdomen in order to detach the colon from the omentum and approach the lesser sac. The stomach was dissected. A tape was placed around the stomach through the abdominal wall, making it possible to retract the stomach at the level of the pyloric junction towards the upper part of the abdomen. A second tape was placed at the antral part in order to achieve a retraction towards the left hypochondrium at the superior part of the abdomen. The mesentericoportal axis was identified and dissected at the inferior border of the pancreas. The right gastroepiploic vein was one of the landmarks. The superior border of the pancreas was dissected in order to identify the splenic artery and a tape was positioned around it. The dissection was performed progressively at the anterior aspect of the mesentericoportal axis through an avascular channel. A tape was subsequently positioned around the pancreatic isthmus. The pancreas was divided with a stapler. The stapling was performed very progressively to avoid crushing the pancreas. The splenic vein was dissected in order to preserve the left gastric vein and a tape was positioned around it. The splenic artery was first divided between two clips on the remaining surface. The splenic vein was also divided. Dissection was pursued from the right to the left, making it possible to mobilize the pancreas. The inferior mesenteric vein was dissected and divided. Dissection of the posterior mesogastrium was initiated, making it possible to mobilize the splenopancreatic block. The dissection was performed anteriorly to the plane of Gerota’s fascia, anteriorly to the kidney. Since the posterior dissection was almost complete, our attention was turned to the superior part to complete the dissection of lesser sac adhesions at the superior border of the pancreas. It was necessary to divide the greater omentum by gradually dividing the short gastric vessels. Due to venous derivations linked to segmental portal hypertension, this dissection was performed through the application of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Since the entire specimen had been divided and freed, it was placed in a bag to be extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
P Pessaux, X Untereiner, Z Cherkaoui, V Louis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
6114 views
608 likes
0 comments
45:34
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection
We reported a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with spleen resection for a mucinous cystic lesion. Four ports were positioned. The greater omentum was retracted to the superior part of the abdomen in order to detach the colon from the omentum and approach the lesser sac. The stomach was dissected. A tape was placed around the stomach through the abdominal wall, making it possible to retract the stomach at the level of the pyloric junction towards the upper part of the abdomen. A second tape was placed at the antral part in order to achieve a retraction towards the left hypochondrium at the superior part of the abdomen. The mesentericoportal axis was identified and dissected at the inferior border of the pancreas. The right gastroepiploic vein was one of the landmarks. The superior border of the pancreas was dissected in order to identify the splenic artery and a tape was positioned around it. The dissection was performed progressively at the anterior aspect of the mesentericoportal axis through an avascular channel. A tape was subsequently positioned around the pancreatic isthmus. The pancreas was divided with a stapler. The stapling was performed very progressively to avoid crushing the pancreas. The splenic vein was dissected in order to preserve the left gastric vein and a tape was positioned around it. The splenic artery was first divided between two clips on the remaining surface. The splenic vein was also divided. Dissection was pursued from the right to the left, making it possible to mobilize the pancreas. The inferior mesenteric vein was dissected and divided. Dissection of the posterior mesogastrium was initiated, making it possible to mobilize the splenopancreatic block. The dissection was performed anteriorly to the plane of Gerota’s fascia, anteriorly to the kidney. Since the posterior dissection was almost complete, our attention was turned to the superior part to complete the dissection of lesser sac adhesions at the superior border of the pancreas. It was necessary to divide the greater omentum by gradually dividing the short gastric vessels. Due to venous derivations linked to segmental portal hypertension, this dissection was performed through the application of the Endo GIA™ linear stapler. Since the entire specimen had been divided and freed, it was placed in a bag to be extracted through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
In this video, a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with a splenectomy is demonstrated. The colon is mobilized from the omentum and the splenic flexure is lowered completely. The dissection is completed towards the right side in order to access the pancreatic isthmus. The dissection is initiated at the level of the inferior pancreatic port in order to identify the mesentericoportal axis. The retropancreatic dissection is performed. The splenic vein and the splenic artery are dissected and taped. A tape is placed around the pancreas in order to facilitate the dissection thanks to the traction exerted. The pancreas is divided by means of a stapler, tan cartridge. The splenic vessels were divided through Hem-o-lok™ Polymer Locking Ligation Systems. The dissection is performed from the right to the left side of the retropancreatic region. The greater omentum is dissected in close contact with the greater curvature of the stomach. The short gastric vessels are progressively divided. The division of the posterior mesogastrium allows to completely free the specimen, which is then placed in a bag. The specimen is removed through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2856 views
166 likes
0 comments
21:51
Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
In this video, a laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with a splenectomy is demonstrated. The colon is mobilized from the omentum and the splenic flexure is lowered completely. The dissection is completed towards the right side in order to access the pancreatic isthmus. The dissection is initiated at the level of the inferior pancreatic port in order to identify the mesentericoportal axis. The retropancreatic dissection is performed. The splenic vein and the splenic artery are dissected and taped. A tape is placed around the pancreas in order to facilitate the dissection thanks to the traction exerted. The pancreas is divided by means of a stapler, tan cartridge. The splenic vessels were divided through Hem-o-lok™ Polymer Locking Ligation Systems. The dissection is performed from the right to the left side of the retropancreatic region. The greater omentum is dissected in close contact with the greater curvature of the stomach. The short gastric vessels are progressively divided. The division of the posterior mesogastrium allows to completely free the specimen, which is then placed in a bag. The specimen is removed through a suprapubic Pfannenstiel’s incision.
Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma
We report the case of a robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma. The patient is positioned in the French position with the assistant between the legs and the robot at the head. Five trocars are used: the camera is introduced through the umbilical trocar. The operation begins with the exploration of the peritoneum and of the liver. The gastric antrum is divided. Each structure of the hepatic pedicle is skeletonized. The superior border of the pancreas is dissected, hence allowing to approach the mesentericoportal axis.
The surgeon proceeds to the inferior border of the pancreas in order to find the mesentericoportal axis and to achieve a retropancreatic passage, which is where the pancreas will be divided. The pancreas is divided using the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The first jejunal loop is divided with a stapler. The specimen is totally mobilized ‘en bloc’, and freed from the portal vascular axis with a dissection of the right border of the coeliac trunk. At the end of the dissection, the different arterial and venous structures are skeletonized with a lymph node resection. The reconstruction is performed with a pancreaticogastrostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, and gastrojejunostomy.
P Pessaux, R Memeo, V De Blasi, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2680 views
244 likes
0 comments
28:02
Robotic pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma
We report the case of a robot-assisted pancreaticoduodenectomy for vaterian ampulloma. The patient is positioned in the French position with the assistant between the legs and the robot at the head. Five trocars are used: the camera is introduced through the umbilical trocar. The operation begins with the exploration of the peritoneum and of the liver. The gastric antrum is divided. Each structure of the hepatic pedicle is skeletonized. The superior border of the pancreas is dissected, hence allowing to approach the mesentericoportal axis.
The surgeon proceeds to the inferior border of the pancreas in order to find the mesentericoportal axis and to achieve a retropancreatic passage, which is where the pancreas will be divided. The pancreas is divided using the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The first jejunal loop is divided with a stapler. The specimen is totally mobilized ‘en bloc’, and freed from the portal vascular axis with a dissection of the right border of the coeliac trunk. At the end of the dissection, the different arterial and venous structures are skeletonized with a lymph node resection. The reconstruction is performed with a pancreaticogastrostomy, hepaticojejunostomy, and gastrojejunostomy.
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.
G Dapri, NA Bascombe, L Gerard, C Samaniego Ballar, C Jiménez Viñas
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3212 views
237 likes
1 comment
10:22
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.