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Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
G Lozano Dubernard, R Gil-Ortiz Mejía, B Rueda Torres, NS Gómez Peña-Alfaro
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
5348 views
25 likes
4 comments
12:40
Heller's cardiomyotomy for achalasia
Achalasia stems from Greek and means “a” (not) and “khálasis” (relaxation).
Idiopathic megaesophagus (achalasia) is an esophageal primary motor irregularity. It is characterized by the absence of esophageal peristalsis, together with incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter after swallowing.
Differential diagnosis must be made between Chagas disease and esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. The incidence rate ranges from 0.5 to 1 per 100,000 persons-years of study. Although there are several theories, the etiology remains unknown.
The first clinical description was made by Sir Thomas Wills (1672). He used to treat the disease via dilation with a sponge attached to a whalebone. Arthur Hertz was the first to name the disease “achalasia”. Ernest Heller performed the first successful esophagectomy in 1913. Zaaijer was the first to describe the anterior myotomy in 1923.
Other therapeutic procedures include botulinum toxin injection into the lower esophageal sphincter. It has transient effects and patients can develop tolerance to the injections. Another option is endoscopic hydropneumatic dilation, which should be fluoroscopically-guided. When it fails, the efficacy of other therapeutic options decreases. The most serious complication is esophageal perforation.
The diagnostic criteria are based on endoscopic findings. Endoscopy reveals there are food remains as well as esophageal dilation, and decreased motility. X-ray exams show esophageal dilation and narrowing of the lower esophageal sphincter. Manometric findings show decreased esophageal motility, increased lower esophageal sphincter pressure, and incomplete relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter.
The patient was operated on. Since there was no hiatal hernia, laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication was chosen, based on its efficacy in preventing reflux, as well as in keeping the myotomy free of a wrap.
A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
S Greco, M Giulii Capponi, M Lotti, M Khotcholava
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1256 views
4 likes
2 comments
14:14
A young lady with dysphagia and GIST after a complicated sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity
A 34 year-old woman was referred to us for persistent dysphagia and retrosternal chest pain, aggravated by eating. Two years earlier, she underwent a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy for morbid obesity.
Her operation was complicated by septic shock due to an esophagogastric fistula with subphrenic abscesses, and on postoperative day 20, she underwent a laparotomy, abscess debridement and drainage, splenectomy and application of cyanoacrylate-based glue, followed by endoscopic positioning of a self-expandable partially coated prosthesis.
Three weeks afterwards, her prosthesis was replaced with a self-expandable fully coated prosthesis due to persistent leak. This prosthesis was finally removed after 7 weeks.
One year after her operation, at gastroscopy, a 25mm submucosal nodule covered with an ulcerated mucosa was found in the proximal antrum. Biopsy was negative, and endoscopic ultrasonography was suggestive of GIST.
She underwent an esophageal manometry, which was indicative of esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction. Her barium swallow test showed a delayed esophageal emptying due to the narrowing and twisting of the proximal part of the stomach. Her abdominal MRI was normal.
An exploratory laparoscopy was indicated for adhesiolysis and removal of the antral lesion.
Total duration of the operation was 3 hours. Her postoperative course was uneventful and she was discharged on postoperative day 6.
Her postoperative swallow study showed the easy passage of the contrast agent with no leaks. The patient completely recovered from her symptoms, and remained asymptomatic after 30 months. Final histology of her lesion evidenced a foreign body granuloma.
Minimally invasive surgery for esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up
The accidental ingestion of caustic agents is a common problem in pediatric emergency units. These agents can cause a series of damage to the upper gastrointestinal tract and can lead to an esophageal stricture. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl who was referred to our hospital for vomiting and hematemesis after ingesting a caustic solution. Physical examination revealed tongue edema and denuded buccal mucosa. Friable mucosa and esophageal ulceration were observed in the endoscopy. The patient was administered omeprazole and a nasogastric tube was placed for a week. Two esophageal strictures were observed after 3 weeks of the ingestion. The patient underwent esophageal dilatation once or twice a month during 21 months depending on the symptoms. Due to the refractory stricture, we decided to perform an esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up by combining thoracoscopy, laparoscopy, and cervicotomy. In addition, we performed a jejunostomy to provide sufficient nutritional support. The patient started feeding on postoperative day 7 and she is currently asymptomatic.
I Cano Novillo, A García Vázquez, F de la Cruz Vigo, B Aneiros Castro
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
846 views
4 likes
1 comment
12:40
Minimally invasive surgery for esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up
The accidental ingestion of caustic agents is a common problem in pediatric emergency units. These agents can cause a series of damage to the upper gastrointestinal tract and can lead to an esophageal stricture. We present the case of a 4-year-old girl who was referred to our hospital for vomiting and hematemesis after ingesting a caustic solution. Physical examination revealed tongue edema and denuded buccal mucosa. Friable mucosa and esophageal ulceration were observed in the endoscopy. The patient was administered omeprazole and a nasogastric tube was placed for a week. Two esophageal strictures were observed after 3 weeks of the ingestion. The patient underwent esophageal dilatation once or twice a month during 21 months depending on the symptoms. Due to the refractory stricture, we decided to perform an esophagectomy and tubularized gastric pull-up by combining thoracoscopy, laparoscopy, and cervicotomy. In addition, we performed a jejunostomy to provide sufficient nutritional support. The patient started feeding on postoperative day 7 and she is currently asymptomatic.
Esophagectomy : Thoracoscopic or robotic?
For esophageal cancer patients, radical esophagolymphadenectomy is the cornerstone of multimodality therapy with a curative intent. However, the percentage of cardiopulmonary complications associated with the transthoracic approach is high. Recent studies have shown that robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy (RATE) is at least equivalent to the open transthoracic approach for esophageal cancer in terms of short-term oncological outcomes. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. YK Chao, MD, PhD, presents a comparison between techniques, goes through a review of the literature and provides a single surgeon’s experience with the use of the robot in the management of this disease.
YK Chao
Lecture
8 months ago
158 views
0 likes
0 comments
19:50
Esophagectomy : Thoracoscopic or robotic?
For esophageal cancer patients, radical esophagolymphadenectomy is the cornerstone of multimodality therapy with a curative intent. However, the percentage of cardiopulmonary complications associated with the transthoracic approach is high. Recent studies have shown that robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy (RATE) is at least equivalent to the open transthoracic approach for esophageal cancer in terms of short-term oncological outcomes. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. YK Chao, MD, PhD, presents a comparison between techniques, goes through a review of the literature and provides a single surgeon’s experience with the use of the robot in the management of this disease.
Robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy
The standard curative treatment for patients with esophageal cancer is perioperative chemotherapy or preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by open transthoracic esophagectomy (OTE). However, robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy (RAMIE) resulted in a lower percentage of overall surgery-related and cardiopulmonary complications with lower postoperative pain, better short-term quality of life, and a better short-term postoperative functional recovery as compared to OTE. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. JP Ruurda, MD, PhD addresses his team experience with RAMIE since 2003. He goes through a review of the literature and presents a clinical case describing the operative steps of the robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy.
JP Ruurda
Lecture
8 months ago
553 views
3 likes
0 comments
26:15
Robot-assisted minimally invasive thoraco-laparoscopic esophagectomy
The standard curative treatment for patients with esophageal cancer is perioperative chemotherapy or preoperative chemoradiotherapy followed by open transthoracic esophagectomy (OTE). However, robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy (RAMIE) resulted in a lower percentage of overall surgery-related and cardiopulmonary complications with lower postoperative pain, better short-term quality of life, and a better short-term postoperative functional recovery as compared to OTE. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. JP Ruurda, MD, PhD addresses his team experience with RAMIE since 2003. He goes through a review of the literature and presents a clinical case describing the operative steps of the robot-assisted minimally invasive thoracolaparoscopic esophagectomy.
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1727 views
7 likes
0 comments
08:13
Robotic Heller myotomy with Dor fundoplication for esophageal achalasia
Achalasia is an esophageal motility disorder characterized by an incomplete or absent esophagogastric junction (EGJ) relaxation associated with loss of peristalsis or uncoordinated contractions of the esophageal body in response to swallowing. All available treatments for achalasia are palliative, directed towards the elimination of the outflow resistance caused by abnormal lower esophageal sphincter (LES) function and aiming to improve the symptoms related to esophageal stasis, such as dysphagia and regurgitation. Laparoscopic Heller myotomy with partial fundoplication is the current standard of care for the treatment of achalasia. It is associated with symptom improvement or relief in about 90% of patients. However, it is a challenging procedure with the potential risk of esophageal perforation reported in up to 10% of cases. Interestingly, laparoscopic myotomy has some limitations which depend on the laparoscopic technique (bidimensional vision, poor range of movement) and on the surgeon’s experience. Recently, the use of the robotic technology has been proposed claiming that it might reduce intraoperative esophageal perforation rates and improve postoperative quality of life after Heller myotomy, mainly due to the 3D view and enhanced dexterity of the surgeon. Despite significant improvements in surgical treatment, the length of myotomy is still a matter of debate to date. Substantially, although some authors proposed a limited myotomy on the lower esophagus preserving a small portion of the LES to prevent postoperative reflux, most authors recommended a myotomy extending 4 to 6cm on the esophagus and 1 to 2cm on the gastric side. In this video, we performed a 6cm long esophagogastric myotomy, with a 2.5cm proximal extension above the Z-line (endoscopically recognized) and a 3.5cm distal extension below the same landmark. In a previous experimental study with intraoperative computerized manometry, we observed that myotomy of the esophageal portion of the LES (without dissection of the gastric fibers) did not lead to any significant variation in sphincteric pressure. Instead, the dissection of the gastric fibers for at least 2 to 2.5cm on the anterior gastric wall created a significant modification of the LES pressure profile. This may be due to the interruption of the anterior portion of gastric semicircular clasp and sling fibers, with consequent loss of their hook properties on the LES pressure profile.
Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction for a terminal achalasia
Introduction: Idiopathic achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Generally, treatment is the "palliation" of symptoms and improvement in quality of life. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy is required in 5 to 10% of cases.
The authors present a case of a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction in a woman with long-term achalasia and megaesophagus.
Clinical case: A 54-year-old woman, with a previous history of a "psychological eating disorder", was referred to the Emergency Department. She complained of epigastric pain and dysphagia. A thoraco-abdominal CT-scan was requested and revealed a dilated, tortuous, sigmoid esophagus, filled with food content, with no identifiable mass causing obstruction. The patient was admitted to hospital and further study was performed --esophagogastroscopy and esophageal manometry - which confirmed the diagnosis of achalasia with esophageal aperistalses.
The patient was proposed a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction.
No complications were reported in the postoperative period, and discharge was possible on postoperative day 7. Six months later, an esophagram showed adequate contrast passage and progression.
Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy as a primary treatment of achalasia might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are contraindications to a more conservative approach.
AM Pereira, J Magalhães, R Ferreira de Almeida, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3595 views
290 likes
0 comments
09:29
Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction for a terminal achalasia
Introduction: Idiopathic achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Generally, treatment is the "palliation" of symptoms and improvement in quality of life. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy is required in 5 to 10% of cases.
The authors present a case of a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction in a woman with long-term achalasia and megaesophagus.
Clinical case: A 54-year-old woman, with a previous history of a "psychological eating disorder", was referred to the Emergency Department. She complained of epigastric pain and dysphagia. A thoraco-abdominal CT-scan was requested and revealed a dilated, tortuous, sigmoid esophagus, filled with food content, with no identifiable mass causing obstruction. The patient was admitted to hospital and further study was performed --esophagogastroscopy and esophageal manometry - which confirmed the diagnosis of achalasia with esophageal aperistalses.
The patient was proposed a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction.
No complications were reported in the postoperative period, and discharge was possible on postoperative day 7. Six months later, an esophagram showed adequate contrast passage and progression.
Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy as a primary treatment of achalasia might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are contraindications to a more conservative approach.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy
A 65-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with complaints of dysphagia. She had a surgical history of cesarean section and cholecystectomy. Esophageal motility examination showed a normal lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and the absence of hiatal hernia and spasm in the distal part of the esophagus. The barium X-ray showed a bulky diverticulum in the middle thoracic esophagus and barium collecting inside the diverticulum without obstruction. The 3D-CT image also showed a giant diverticulum in the middle esophagus. The diverticulum was located below the azygos vein and carina of the bronchus and was sticking out from the middle esophagus in the contralateral side of the thoracic aorta. The diverticulum does not invade other organs. The patient was then proposed for an elective surgery, a thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy in a prone position.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1393 views
112 likes
0 comments
41:44
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy
A 65-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with complaints of dysphagia. She had a surgical history of cesarean section and cholecystectomy. Esophageal motility examination showed a normal lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and the absence of hiatal hernia and spasm in the distal part of the esophagus. The barium X-ray showed a bulky diverticulum in the middle thoracic esophagus and barium collecting inside the diverticulum without obstruction. The 3D-CT image also showed a giant diverticulum in the middle esophagus. The diverticulum was located below the azygos vein and carina of the bronchus and was sticking out from the middle esophagus in the contralateral side of the thoracic aorta. The diverticulum does not invade other organs. The patient was then proposed for an elective surgery, a thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy in a prone position.
Minimally invasive management of an epiphrenic diverticulum
We present the case of a 65-year-old gentleman who was referred to our department with long standing symptoms of dysphagia, reflux, and regurgitation. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was initially performed to evaluate his symptoms and showed food residue in the esophagus and a wide-necked epiphrenic diverticulum extending from 38 to 41cm with superficial ulceration within it. The esophagogastric junction was at 45cm and appeared tight, which was consistent with the appearance of achalasia. A subsequent barium swallow and manometric studies confirmed the endoscopic findings. A minimally invasive laparoscopic approach was adopted for trans-hiatal dissection and diverticulectomy. Heller’s myotomy combined with an anti-reflux procedure was also performed to deal with the underlying achalasia as the cause of this pulsion diverticulum. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful with complete resolution of his symptoms.
WT Butt, M Arumugasamy
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1161 views
60 likes
0 comments
08:19
Minimally invasive management of an epiphrenic diverticulum
We present the case of a 65-year-old gentleman who was referred to our department with long standing symptoms of dysphagia, reflux, and regurgitation. An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was initially performed to evaluate his symptoms and showed food residue in the esophagus and a wide-necked epiphrenic diverticulum extending from 38 to 41cm with superficial ulceration within it. The esophagogastric junction was at 45cm and appeared tight, which was consistent with the appearance of achalasia. A subsequent barium swallow and manometric studies confirmed the endoscopic findings. A minimally invasive laparoscopic approach was adopted for trans-hiatal dissection and diverticulectomy. Heller’s myotomy combined with an anti-reflux procedure was also performed to deal with the underlying achalasia as the cause of this pulsion diverticulum. The patient’s postoperative recovery was uneventful with complete resolution of his symptoms.
Laparoscopic enucleation of a horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus
This is the case of a 17-year-old girl, complaining of weight loss and dysphagia. In the preoperative work-up, gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a 3-4cm multilobulated submucosal mass. Computed tomography and MRI showed a distal esophageal mass of 4cm in diameter. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was compatible with a leiomyoma. The patient was admitted to hospital for surgery, and a laparoscopic transhiatal enucleation of the esophageal leiomyoma was performed. The patient was placed in a gynecologic position, with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs. The first assistant stood on the right side of the patient and the second assistant on the left. The procedure was performed using 5 trocars. The phrenoesophageal membrane was divided. The distal esophagus was circumferentially mobilized. Dissection was started by separating the layer over the tumor. Blunt dissection was preferred. The use of energy devices discouraged to prevent any delayed mucosal burn injury. The leiomyoma was completely enucleated. Esophageal muscle layers were closed. The postoperative period was uneventful. This video demonstrates technical details of a laparoscopic enucleation of a hoseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus.
K Karabulut, S Usta, E Sahin, Z Cetinkaya
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
626 views
43 likes
0 comments
11:21
Laparoscopic enucleation of a horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus
This is the case of a 17-year-old girl, complaining of weight loss and dysphagia. In the preoperative work-up, gastroscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography revealed a 3-4cm multilobulated submucosal mass. Computed tomography and MRI showed a distal esophageal mass of 4cm in diameter. Fine needle aspiration biopsy was compatible with a leiomyoma. The patient was admitted to hospital for surgery, and a laparoscopic transhiatal enucleation of the esophageal leiomyoma was performed. The patient was placed in a gynecologic position, with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs. The first assistant stood on the right side of the patient and the second assistant on the left. The procedure was performed using 5 trocars. The phrenoesophageal membrane was divided. The distal esophagus was circumferentially mobilized. Dissection was started by separating the layer over the tumor. Blunt dissection was preferred. The use of energy devices discouraged to prevent any delayed mucosal burn injury. The leiomyoma was completely enucleated. Esophageal muscle layers were closed. The postoperative period was uneventful. This video demonstrates technical details of a laparoscopic enucleation of a hoseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the distal esophagus.
Laparoscopic gastrostomy in a patient with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis are considered to be the "gold standard" for patients with neurological or oncologic diseases, which do not allow feeding per os. When they fail, surgical gastrostomy is considered. Recent data suggest that the laparoscopic approach may be better regarding early complications as compared to PEG.
We present the case of an 81-year-old male patient diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The patient presented with total dysphagia. The attempt of placing a self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis was unsuccessful. The patient was then proposed for the placement of a feeding laparoscopic gastrostomy. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day two.
Surgical gastrostomy is associated with frequent complications, such as erythema, chronic suppuration, migration and complications associated with surgical access. Laparoscopic access and technical details of the procedure allowed to reduce such complications and to perform the main steps under direct visual control, making it very safe and easily reproducible.
A Gomes, D Luis, T Carneiro, C Veiga
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2011 views
58 likes
0 comments
06:40
Laparoscopic gastrostomy in a patient with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma
Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) and self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis are considered to be the "gold standard" for patients with neurological or oncologic diseases, which do not allow feeding per os. When they fail, surgical gastrostomy is considered. Recent data suggest that the laparoscopic approach may be better regarding early complications as compared to PEG.
We present the case of an 81-year-old male patient diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The patient presented with total dysphagia. The attempt of placing a self-expanding endoscopic prosthesis was unsuccessful. The patient was then proposed for the placement of a feeding laparoscopic gastrostomy. The postoperative period was uneventful and the patient was discharged on day two.
Surgical gastrostomy is associated with frequent complications, such as erythema, chronic suppuration, migration and complications associated with surgical access. Laparoscopic access and technical details of the procedure allowed to reduce such complications and to perform the main steps under direct visual control, making it very safe and easily reproducible.
When and how to manage esophageal diverticula: surgical and endoscopic procedures
Esophageal diverticula are rare. They may occur in the pharyngoesophageal area (Zenker's), mid-esophagus, or distally (epiphrenic). Most patients with diverticula are asymptomatic. Fewer than one-third of the diverticula produce symptoms severe enough to seek medical attention or to warrant surgery.
Surgical treatment has changed significantly with the development of minimally invasive methods which have increasingly replaced open surgery. If certain indications persist for open surgery, Zenker’s diverticulum is mainly treated with transoral endoscopic flexible or rigid techniques. This approach, which consists of a marsupialization of the diverticulum, also treats the concomitant motor disorder. These esophageal motor disorders are also present in the vast majority of patients with mid-esophageal or epiphrenic diverticula. These diseases are also treated mainly using a minimally invasive approach which consists of a diverticulectomy associated with an esophageal myotomy, which is widely recommended.
B Dallemagne
Lecture
3 years ago
818 views
28 likes
0 comments
24:26
When and how to manage esophageal diverticula: surgical and endoscopic procedures
Esophageal diverticula are rare. They may occur in the pharyngoesophageal area (Zenker's), mid-esophagus, or distally (epiphrenic). Most patients with diverticula are asymptomatic. Fewer than one-third of the diverticula produce symptoms severe enough to seek medical attention or to warrant surgery.
Surgical treatment has changed significantly with the development of minimally invasive methods which have increasingly replaced open surgery. If certain indications persist for open surgery, Zenker’s diverticulum is mainly treated with transoral endoscopic flexible or rigid techniques. This approach, which consists of a marsupialization of the diverticulum, also treats the concomitant motor disorder. These esophageal motor disorders are also present in the vast majority of patients with mid-esophageal or epiphrenic diverticula. These diseases are also treated mainly using a minimally invasive approach which consists of a diverticulectomy associated with an esophageal myotomy, which is widely recommended.
Laparoscopic resection of an epiphrenic diverticulum
This video shows a laparoscopic resection of a large epiphrenic diverticulum and an esophageal myotomy with partial posterior fundoplication. Abdominal obesity as well as an accessory left hepatic artery originating from the left gastric artery make dissection of the right para-esophageal area difficult. An anterior phrenotomy as well as the posterior retro-esophageal dissection towards the aorta make dissection of the diverticulum possible. The upper limit of the diverticulum is strongly attached to the esophagus and the pleura, and its dissection is difficult. After complete dissection of the diverticulum and with the guidance of an intraoperative endoscopy, resection is performed. As it is believed that an underlying motility disorder is present, a distal esophageal myotomy and partial fundoplication is added. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient has no remaining symptoms.
P Vorwald, M Posada, S Ayora González, D Cortés, M de Vega Irañeta, C Ferrero, ML Sánchez de Molina
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
983 views
21 likes
0 comments
16:35
Laparoscopic resection of an epiphrenic diverticulum
This video shows a laparoscopic resection of a large epiphrenic diverticulum and an esophageal myotomy with partial posterior fundoplication. Abdominal obesity as well as an accessory left hepatic artery originating from the left gastric artery make dissection of the right para-esophageal area difficult. An anterior phrenotomy as well as the posterior retro-esophageal dissection towards the aorta make dissection of the diverticulum possible. The upper limit of the diverticulum is strongly attached to the esophagus and the pleura, and its dissection is difficult. After complete dissection of the diverticulum and with the guidance of an intraoperative endoscopy, resection is performed. As it is believed that an underlying motility disorder is present, a distal esophageal myotomy and partial fundoplication is added. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient has no remaining symptoms.
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
C Peillon, G Philouze, JM Baste
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
615 views
14 likes
0 comments
09:09
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the thoracic esophagus
This is the case of a 36-year-old woman with symptoms which have been present for 18 months. Her main symptoms were the following: difficulty to swallow food accompanied by retrosternal discomfort. Upper endoscopy performed on September 29, 2011 found an extrinsic compression of the esophageal wall located 28cm away from the upper dental arcade with a mucosa which appeared to be normal. That extrinsic compression goes until 33cm from the upper dental arcade. The patient was evaluated by a gastroenterologist who performed an echo-endoscopy on March 7, 2012. The gastroenterologist observed a heterogeneous hypo-echoic mass coming from the muscular layer, 25 to 33cm away from the esophagus. The diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma was established. The patient was admitted to hospital for surgery, and a laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was performed on May 22, 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the excision of a horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the thoracic esophagus. In addition, it shows a transfixing stitch, which is performed to exert traction on the tumor.
DU Castro Nuñez
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
759 views
4 likes
0 comments
10:18
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the thoracic esophagus
This is the case of a 36-year-old woman with symptoms which have been present for 18 months. Her main symptoms were the following: difficulty to swallow food accompanied by retrosternal discomfort. Upper endoscopy performed on September 29, 2011 found an extrinsic compression of the esophageal wall located 28cm away from the upper dental arcade with a mucosa which appeared to be normal. That extrinsic compression goes until 33cm from the upper dental arcade. The patient was evaluated by a gastroenterologist who performed an echo-endoscopy on March 7, 2012. The gastroenterologist observed a heterogeneous hypo-echoic mass coming from the muscular layer, 25 to 33cm away from the esophagus. The diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma was established. The patient was admitted to hospital for surgery, and a laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was performed on May 22, 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the excision of a horseshoe-shaped leiomyoma of the thoracic esophagus. In addition, it shows a transfixing stitch, which is performed to exert traction on the tumor.
Laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release
The video demonstrates the case of a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release for a patient presenting with median arcuate ligament syndrome. This is a 37-year-old woman who was admitted to our clinic with complaints of intermittent abdominal pain, especially with meals, for 3 years’ duration. Her physical examination was unremarkable, except for an epigastric bruit detected on auscultation. Investigations included a duplex ultrasound, which showed increased hemodynamic velocities in the celiac trunk. In addition, CT-angiogram of the abdomen revealed an 80% luminal narrowing and extrinsic compression of the celiac artery at its origin. Her symptoms could be a result of foregut ischemia caused by the vessel’s narrowing. A potential anatomical factor contributing to extrinsic compression is the median arcuate ligament. This video explains our operative approach and technique used to dissect the esophagus at the hiatus, creating a subsequent pathway to identify the median arcuate ligament inferiorly and transect it down to the level of the celiac trunk’s origin. This will allow for relief of the external vascular compression and increased blood flow to the foregut and relief of her abdominal pain. Postoperatively, the patient had complete resolution of her abdominal symptoms.
N De La Cruz-Munoz, K Mohammad
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1497 views
37 likes
0 comments
13:19
Laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release
The video demonstrates the case of a laparoscopic median arcuate ligament release for a patient presenting with median arcuate ligament syndrome. This is a 37-year-old woman who was admitted to our clinic with complaints of intermittent abdominal pain, especially with meals, for 3 years’ duration. Her physical examination was unremarkable, except for an epigastric bruit detected on auscultation. Investigations included a duplex ultrasound, which showed increased hemodynamic velocities in the celiac trunk. In addition, CT-angiogram of the abdomen revealed an 80% luminal narrowing and extrinsic compression of the celiac artery at its origin. Her symptoms could be a result of foregut ischemia caused by the vessel’s narrowing. A potential anatomical factor contributing to extrinsic compression is the median arcuate ligament. This video explains our operative approach and technique used to dissect the esophagus at the hiatus, creating a subsequent pathway to identify the median arcuate ligament inferiorly and transect it down to the level of the celiac trunk’s origin. This will allow for relief of the external vascular compression and increased blood flow to the foregut and relief of her abdominal pain. Postoperatively, the patient had complete resolution of her abdominal symptoms.
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of giant esophageal leiomyoma
This is the case of a 36-year-old male patient who had slowly progressing symptoms for 10 years. These symptoms were the following: hiccups, progressive dysphagia, first for solids, and then for liquids, and gastro-esophageal reflux. In 2003, the patient was first evaluated in a private clinic and diagnosed with esophageal wall hernia. In 2010, his symptoms were still present and he was evaluated by a physician who performed a new endoscopy, which demonstrated a 90% obstruction of the esophageal lumen. A biopsy was also performed. It was negative for malignancy, hence providing the diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma.
In December 2011, a CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound were performed leading to the conclusion of an esophageal leiomyoma. A laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was decided upon in July 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the usefulness of a hook clamp to facilitate traction of the leiomyoma. Additionally, it shows an intraoperative complication consisting in a perforation of the esophageal mucosa, which was sutured by means of Vicryl 4/0.
DU Castro Nuñez, L Bao Romero, L Belloni Caceres
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
525 views
4 likes
0 comments
09:57
Laparoscopic transhiatal resection of giant esophageal leiomyoma
This is the case of a 36-year-old male patient who had slowly progressing symptoms for 10 years. These symptoms were the following: hiccups, progressive dysphagia, first for solids, and then for liquids, and gastro-esophageal reflux. In 2003, the patient was first evaluated in a private clinic and diagnosed with esophageal wall hernia. In 2010, his symptoms were still present and he was evaluated by a physician who performed a new endoscopy, which demonstrated a 90% obstruction of the esophageal lumen. A biopsy was also performed. It was negative for malignancy, hence providing the diagnosis of esophageal leiomyoma.
In December 2011, a CT-scan and endoscopic ultrasound were performed leading to the conclusion of an esophageal leiomyoma. A laparoscopic transhiatal resection of the esophageal leiomyoma was decided upon in July 2012.
This case is essential because it shows the usefulness of a hook clamp to facilitate traction of the leiomyoma. Additionally, it shows an intraoperative complication consisting in a perforation of the esophageal mucosa, which was sutured by means of Vicryl 4/0.
Collis Nissen procedure after lung transplantation and laparoscopic management of mediastinal hematoma
After lung transplantation, GERD causes inflammatory reactions, increasing risks for obliterating bronchiolitis and dysfunctioning graft. Authors first present a laparoscopic Collis Nissen procedure for hiatal hernia and severe esophagitis in a grafted patient. Because of a short esophagus despite extended dissection, a Collis gastroplasty is required. After stapling, cruroplasty is performed, finally followed by a Nissen fundoplication. In case of severe esophagitis, a difficult dissection and inflammatory tissues can lead to more complications such as leak, hemorrhage, slippage, and abscess. Mediastinal hematoma is diagnosed on postoperative day 9, mandating a redo emergency intervention. This rare complication will be managed laparoscopically.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, HA Mercoli, L Marx, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1737 views
58 likes
0 comments
21:07
Collis Nissen procedure after lung transplantation and laparoscopic management of mediastinal hematoma
After lung transplantation, GERD causes inflammatory reactions, increasing risks for obliterating bronchiolitis and dysfunctioning graft. Authors first present a laparoscopic Collis Nissen procedure for hiatal hernia and severe esophagitis in a grafted patient. Because of a short esophagus despite extended dissection, a Collis gastroplasty is required. After stapling, cruroplasty is performed, finally followed by a Nissen fundoplication. In case of severe esophagitis, a difficult dissection and inflammatory tissues can lead to more complications such as leak, hemorrhage, slippage, and abscess. Mediastinal hematoma is diagnosed on postoperative day 9, mandating a redo emergency intervention. This rare complication will be managed laparoscopically.
SILS (single access) transhiatal esophagectomy for cancer
An 82-year-old man was referred to our department for a 3cm long esophageal cancer.
He was smoking 40 cigarettes a day and drinking 1.5L of wine a day. He had a BMI of 21 and he was ASA 2.
A CT-scan showed a 3cm tumor not entering the muscle layer and no nodes were found in the mediastinum.
No liver metastases were visible on CT-scan and ultrasonography (US).
During GI endoscopy, a biopsy showed an esophageal adenocarcinoma.
Ejection fraction (EF) during cardiac ultrasound was 55%.
After 15 days of gym workouts in our department (15 minutes of exercise bike in the morning and 20 minutes in the afternoon, and inflating 30 balloons in the morning, 30 at lunchtime and 30 before nighttime), the patient was operated on.
A laparoscopic transhiatal single port esophagectomy was performed according to Orringer’s technique.
Procedure time was 195 minutes. Estimated blood loss was nihil. Time in ICU was 24 hours and hospital stay was 7 days.
This was our 11th case using this technique.
C Huscher
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2634 views
105 likes
0 comments
08:29
SILS (single access) transhiatal esophagectomy for cancer
An 82-year-old man was referred to our department for a 3cm long esophageal cancer.
He was smoking 40 cigarettes a day and drinking 1.5L of wine a day. He had a BMI of 21 and he was ASA 2.
A CT-scan showed a 3cm tumor not entering the muscle layer and no nodes were found in the mediastinum.
No liver metastases were visible on CT-scan and ultrasonography (US).
During GI endoscopy, a biopsy showed an esophageal adenocarcinoma.
Ejection fraction (EF) during cardiac ultrasound was 55%.
After 15 days of gym workouts in our department (15 minutes of exercise bike in the morning and 20 minutes in the afternoon, and inflating 30 balloons in the morning, 30 at lunchtime and 30 before nighttime), the patient was operated on.
A laparoscopic transhiatal single port esophagectomy was performed according to Orringer’s technique.
Procedure time was 195 minutes. Estimated blood loss was nihil. Time in ICU was 24 hours and hospital stay was 7 days.
This was our 11th case using this technique.