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Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
D Kadoche, M Ignat, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
9 months ago
737 views
5 likes
0 comments
08:22
Laparoscopic management of small bowel obstruction and ileo-ileal intussusception
Meckel’s diverticulum is the most common congenital anomaly of the digestive tract, found in 2 to 3% of the population. It is usually detected in children. In adults, symptoms vary, and diagnosis is therefore uneasy to establish. The most common infectious complications include obstructions and bleedings, which account for approximately one third of overall complications. Obstructions may be caused by intussusception or by a band.
This video demonstrates a case of a 49-year-old male patient, who necessitated an emergency surgical procedure for the management of a small bowel obstruction induced by the presence of Meckel’s diverticulum and intussusception. Due to an underlying necrosis, a resection and an anastomosis of the small bowel were performed.
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
V Guarino, A Cappiello, N Perrotta, A Scotti, F Mastellone, D Loffredo
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1933 views
87 likes
0 comments
08:20
Small bowel obstruction and ileal strangulation by adhesions: role of laparoscopy in early diagnosis and treatment
Adhesive small bowel obstruction (ASBO) is a common surgical emergency, most frequently caused by adhesions. In the absence of signs of strangulations or CT-scan evidence (free fluid mesenteric edema, “small bowel faeces” sign, devascularization), a large portion of ASBO can be resolved using non-operative methods even if a significant number of patients will require an emergency surgery.
Laparoscopy in acute care surgery continues to expand even in cases of small bowel obstruction which were conventionally managed by means of laparotomy.
The authors report a case of a 45-year-old woman, completely laparoscopically treated, with a history of previous appendectomy with pelvic abscess, cholecystectomy and removal of right ovarian cysts. She was admitted to the emergency room five hours before surgery with severe acute abdominal pain which appeared 24 hours before.
CT-scan with oral administration of gastrografin showed signs of intestinal obstruction and adhesions were suspected. The exploratory laparoscopy revealed adhesive small bowel obstruction with ileal strangulation. The intestine was viable and resection was unnecessary.
The role of diagnostic imaging modalities is relevant to decrease ASBO-related morbidity and mortality. However, because of the lack of specific radiological signs and laboratory findings of bowel strangulation, the diagnosis requires, when it is not contraindicated, a timely laparoscopic exploration with both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.
Minimally invasive surgical approach to small bowel obstruction
Due to the lack of laparoscopic experience to work in a small space (small bowel distension), small bowel obstruction seems to be a relative contraindication for a minimally invasive approach. In other hands, many patients have co-morbidities, and consequently it is key to work with a low intra-abdominal pressure to prevent any conversion for pneumoperitoneum intolerance. Small bowel obstruction must be resolved by experts in order to prevent any excessive mobilization and iatrogenic perforation.

Critical comments:
This video presents the laparoscopic management of bowel obstruction. It demonstrates the feasibility of the identification and management of mechanical bowel obstruction. Several parts of the video can be discussed:
1. In their comments, the authors report that the whole bowel has to be explored in order to prevent the presence of a secondary band at the origin of the obstruction. This is absolutely mandatory. Usually, the recommendation is to start the exploration at the level of the caecum and to mobilize the whole non-dilated bowel in order to prevent a risk of bowel injury during this manipulation. Exploration of the dilated bowel is much more risky. The authors did not show this extensive and systematic exploration.
2. The authors reported that they used 5 to 10 liters of warm saline for abdominal lavage. Today, there is no evidence of the benefit of this major abdominal lavage including 5 to 10 liters. Selective lavage can be recommended in case of significant bacterial contamination.
3. The authors consider the potential benefit of irrigation of the ischemic bowel with hot water after band division. This indication can be considered as potentially efficient regarding the recommendations in open surgery. However, laparoscopy has a significant advantage to keep the internal temperature of 37°C at a minimum, and certainly hot lavage, which cannot be over 39°C to 40°C, will probably also have limited impact.
Despite these minor remarks, this video has a scientific value in demonstrating a safe approach to a small bowel obstruction related to a single band, which is, in this case, very safely resected.
One can also focus on the value of working with a high quality camera, which gives the surgeon the possibility to clearly evaluate the vitality of the small bowel after an ischemic period, which is well demonstrated in this video.
S Rua, F Silveira, P Mira
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1341 views
61 likes
0 comments
06:59
Minimally invasive surgical approach to small bowel obstruction
Due to the lack of laparoscopic experience to work in a small space (small bowel distension), small bowel obstruction seems to be a relative contraindication for a minimally invasive approach. In other hands, many patients have co-morbidities, and consequently it is key to work with a low intra-abdominal pressure to prevent any conversion for pneumoperitoneum intolerance. Small bowel obstruction must be resolved by experts in order to prevent any excessive mobilization and iatrogenic perforation.

Critical comments:
This video presents the laparoscopic management of bowel obstruction. It demonstrates the feasibility of the identification and management of mechanical bowel obstruction. Several parts of the video can be discussed:
1. In their comments, the authors report that the whole bowel has to be explored in order to prevent the presence of a secondary band at the origin of the obstruction. This is absolutely mandatory. Usually, the recommendation is to start the exploration at the level of the caecum and to mobilize the whole non-dilated bowel in order to prevent a risk of bowel injury during this manipulation. Exploration of the dilated bowel is much more risky. The authors did not show this extensive and systematic exploration.
2. The authors reported that they used 5 to 10 liters of warm saline for abdominal lavage. Today, there is no evidence of the benefit of this major abdominal lavage including 5 to 10 liters. Selective lavage can be recommended in case of significant bacterial contamination.
3. The authors consider the potential benefit of irrigation of the ischemic bowel with hot water after band division. This indication can be considered as potentially efficient regarding the recommendations in open surgery. However, laparoscopy has a significant advantage to keep the internal temperature of 37°C at a minimum, and certainly hot lavage, which cannot be over 39°C to 40°C, will probably also have limited impact.
Despite these minor remarks, this video has a scientific value in demonstrating a safe approach to a small bowel obstruction related to a single band, which is, in this case, very safely resected.
One can also focus on the value of working with a high quality camera, which gives the surgeon the possibility to clearly evaluate the vitality of the small bowel after an ischemic period, which is well demonstrated in this video.
Acute small bowel ischemia: laparoscopic exploration and treatment
We present the case of a 63-year-old male patient admitted to the emergency department with severe acute abdominal pain unresponsive to symptomatic treatment. The clinical examination revealed a generalized peritoneal reaction. The diagnosis of small bowel ischemia with free peritoneal fluid without occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) was established by means of a contrast injected CT-scan.
A laparoscopic exploration allowed to discover a segmental small bowel ischemic necrosis with severe hemorrhagic congestion of the bowel wall. After verifying that the rest of the small bowel and the colon were viable, a laparoscopic resection was performed with an intracorporeal side-to-side anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful with patient discharge on day 4.
Pathological examination confirmed that the resected segment of 92cm had ischemia of the mucosa and of the serosa with intensive congestion and hemorrhagic effusion. The patient’s one-month follow-up was uneventful. A programmed cardiological, hematological and immunological consultation and work-up to look for thrombotic risk factors was negative.
Acute small bowel ischemia is an unusual cause of acute abdomen that is difficult to diagnose due to its non-specific clinical signs. Clinical suspicion is warranted in patients with a past history of cardiovascular thrombotic conditions or hypercoagulable states. In 50% of cases, it is caused by arterial obstruction, in 20 to 30% of cases by non-occlusive arterial ischemia, and by venous occlusion [1] in 5 to 15% of cases. It has a high mortality rate of 59 to 93% and patient survival is highly dependent on a timely diagnosis and treatment. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) consensus for the laparoscopic approach to the acute abdomen states that there is no published data demonstrating advantages in the diagnosis and treatment of acute bowel ischemia by laparoscopy [2]. However, laparoscopy may prove beneficial in confirming the diagnosis in doubtful cases, calculate the extension of the ischemic small bowel segment, and offer a treatment option in cases of segmental necrosis.
1. Brandt LJ, Boley SJ. AGA technical review on intestinal ischemia. American Gastrointestinal Association. Gastroenterology 2000;118:954-68.
2. Agresta F, Ansaloni L, Baiocchi GL, Bergamini C, Campanile FC, Carlucci M, Cocorullo G, Corradi A, Franzato B, Lupo M, Mandalà V, Mirabella A, Pernazza G, Piccoli M, Staudacher C, Vettoretto N, Zago M, Lettieri E, Levati A, Pietrini D, Scaglione M, De Masi S, De Placido G, Francucci M, Rasi M, Fingerhut A, Uranüs S, Garattini S. Laparoscopic approach to acute abdomen from the Consensus Development Conference of the Società Italiana di Chirurgia Endoscopica e nuove tecnologie (SICE), Associazione Chirurghi Ospedalieri Italiani (ACOI), Società Italiana di Chirurgia (SIC), Società Italiana di Chirurgia d'Urgenza e del Trauma (SICUT), Società Italiana di Chirurgia nell'Ospedalità Privata (SICOP), and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES). Surg Endosc 2012;26:2134-64.
D Ntourakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2349 views
68 likes
0 comments
19:57
Acute small bowel ischemia: laparoscopic exploration and treatment
We present the case of a 63-year-old male patient admitted to the emergency department with severe acute abdominal pain unresponsive to symptomatic treatment. The clinical examination revealed a generalized peritoneal reaction. The diagnosis of small bowel ischemia with free peritoneal fluid without occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) or the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) was established by means of a contrast injected CT-scan.
A laparoscopic exploration allowed to discover a segmental small bowel ischemic necrosis with severe hemorrhagic congestion of the bowel wall. After verifying that the rest of the small bowel and the colon were viable, a laparoscopic resection was performed with an intracorporeal side-to-side anastomosis. The postoperative course was uneventful with patient discharge on day 4.
Pathological examination confirmed that the resected segment of 92cm had ischemia of the mucosa and of the serosa with intensive congestion and hemorrhagic effusion. The patient’s one-month follow-up was uneventful. A programmed cardiological, hematological and immunological consultation and work-up to look for thrombotic risk factors was negative.
Acute small bowel ischemia is an unusual cause of acute abdomen that is difficult to diagnose due to its non-specific clinical signs. Clinical suspicion is warranted in patients with a past history of cardiovascular thrombotic conditions or hypercoagulable states. In 50% of cases, it is caused by arterial obstruction, in 20 to 30% of cases by non-occlusive arterial ischemia, and by venous occlusion [1] in 5 to 15% of cases. It has a high mortality rate of 59 to 93% and patient survival is highly dependent on a timely diagnosis and treatment. The European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES) consensus for the laparoscopic approach to the acute abdomen states that there is no published data demonstrating advantages in the diagnosis and treatment of acute bowel ischemia by laparoscopy [2]. However, laparoscopy may prove beneficial in confirming the diagnosis in doubtful cases, calculate the extension of the ischemic small bowel segment, and offer a treatment option in cases of segmental necrosis.
1. Brandt LJ, Boley SJ. AGA technical review on intestinal ischemia. American Gastrointestinal Association. Gastroenterology 2000;118:954-68.
2. Agresta F, Ansaloni L, Baiocchi GL, Bergamini C, Campanile FC, Carlucci M, Cocorullo G, Corradi A, Franzato B, Lupo M, Mandalà V, Mirabella A, Pernazza G, Piccoli M, Staudacher C, Vettoretto N, Zago M, Lettieri E, Levati A, Pietrini D, Scaglione M, De Masi S, De Placido G, Francucci M, Rasi M, Fingerhut A, Uranüs S, Garattini S. Laparoscopic approach to acute abdomen from the Consensus Development Conference of the Società Italiana di Chirurgia Endoscopica e nuove tecnologie (SICE), Associazione Chirurghi Ospedalieri Italiani (ACOI), Società Italiana di Chirurgia (SIC), Società Italiana di Chirurgia d'Urgenza e del Trauma (SICUT), Società Italiana di Chirurgia nell'Ospedalità Privata (SICOP), and the European Association for Endoscopic Surgery (EAES). Surg Endosc 2012;26:2134-64.
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
L Marx, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2997 views
20 likes
0 comments
04:19
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
Laparoscopic treatment of acute small bowel obstruction: multiple cases of laparoscopic adhesiolysis
The video shows the laparoscopic management of three separate cases of acute small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions. The difficulties and advantages of such an approach in this emergency scenario are discussed.
The author begins by inserting a trocar in the umbilicus. Upon exploration of the abdominal cavity, intestinal obstruction becomes clearly evident from the presence of dilated loops and flattened, collapsed loops. The author follows the collapsed loops until the transition zone is identified. The adhesions appear between the greater omentum and the mesentery. This band is divided. Further exploration leads to the finding of a second adhesion. This area shows no signs of occlusion. The author divides this adhesion. Exploration of the remainder of the small bowel continues to rule out further adhesions.
F Costantino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
11 years ago
3975 views
45 likes
0 comments
09:41
Laparoscopic treatment of acute small bowel obstruction: multiple cases of laparoscopic adhesiolysis
The video shows the laparoscopic management of three separate cases of acute small bowel obstruction secondary to adhesions. The difficulties and advantages of such an approach in this emergency scenario are discussed.
The author begins by inserting a trocar in the umbilicus. Upon exploration of the abdominal cavity, intestinal obstruction becomes clearly evident from the presence of dilated loops and flattened, collapsed loops. The author follows the collapsed loops until the transition zone is identified. The adhesions appear between the greater omentum and the mesentery. This band is divided. Further exploration leads to the finding of a second adhesion. This area shows no signs of occlusion. The author divides this adhesion. Exploration of the remainder of the small bowel continues to rule out further adhesions.