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Robot-assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypass using the latest generation of robotic surgical system: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Vieira d'Almeida outlines surgical pitfalls when performing a 5-port Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) using the da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system (Intuitive Surgical). During the video, a comparison is made with other robotic platforms (e.g. da Vinci Si™ system) regarding trocar placement, robotic docking, dexterity, instruments quality, and the introduction of fluorescence systems. Technical steps are provided to create a RYGB with a 100cm alimentary limb and a 150cm biliary limb, transection of the greater omentum, Petersen’s defect and mesenteric defect closure, which are performed routinely.
LA Vieira d'Almeida, M Ignat, R Rodriguez Luna
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1000 views
13 likes
0 comments
09:59
Robot-assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypass using the latest generation of robotic surgical system: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Vieira d'Almeida outlines surgical pitfalls when performing a 5-port Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) using the da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system (Intuitive Surgical). During the video, a comparison is made with other robotic platforms (e.g. da Vinci Si™ system) regarding trocar placement, robotic docking, dexterity, instruments quality, and the introduction of fluorescence systems. Technical steps are provided to create a RYGB with a 100cm alimentary limb and a 150cm biliary limb, transection of the greater omentum, Petersen’s defect and mesenteric defect closure, which are performed routinely.
A standardized step-by-step description of a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Almino Cardoso Ramos shows the case of a morbidly obese 42-year-old woman with a BMI of 41. In the preoperative work-up, the patient lost 4kg. Imaging studies showed normal anatomy and did not evidence any hiatal hernia or GERD. Manometry did not show any motility disorders.
During the procedure, surgical pitfalls are highlighted and discussed in order to create a standardized Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with a biliopancreatic limb of 150cm and an alimentary limb of 100cm. Anatomical landmarks for gastric pouch creation are demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the adequate length measurement for both the biliopancreatic and alimentary limbs in order to ensure weight loss. The author also stresses the necessity to use appropriate staplers along with the ways to prevent stapler-related complications. He outlines his preference for specific suture material to close the enterotomy, and provides tips and tricks for the closure of the mesenteric defect and of Petersen’s space.
A Cardoso Ramos, M Ignat, R Rodriguez Luna
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1812 views
16 likes
0 comments
12:49
A standardized step-by-step description of a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Almino Cardoso Ramos shows the case of a morbidly obese 42-year-old woman with a BMI of 41. In the preoperative work-up, the patient lost 4kg. Imaging studies showed normal anatomy and did not evidence any hiatal hernia or GERD. Manometry did not show any motility disorders.
During the procedure, surgical pitfalls are highlighted and discussed in order to create a standardized Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with a biliopancreatic limb of 150cm and an alimentary limb of 100cm. Anatomical landmarks for gastric pouch creation are demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the adequate length measurement for both the biliopancreatic and alimentary limbs in order to ensure weight loss. The author also stresses the necessity to use appropriate staplers along with the ways to prevent stapler-related complications. He outlines his preference for specific suture material to close the enterotomy, and provides tips and tricks for the closure of the mesenteric defect and of Petersen’s space.
Gastrojejunal anastomosis resizing with Argon Plasma Coagulation (APC) and Apollo OverStitch™ endoscopic suturing system: live procedure
In 2004, a 57-year-old lady underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) for morbid obesity. After the surgical intervention, she lost 13Kg and she started to regain weight back with a current BMI of 41.
During this live procedure, Professor Perretta performs a gastroscopy that shows a normal gastric pouch and a gastrojejunal anastomosis increased in caliber. The operator does an endoscopic resizing of the anastomosis with Argon Plasma Coagulation (APC) followed by the placement of an endoscopic suture with the Apollo OverStitch™ endoscopic suturing system.
S Perretta, M Pizzicannella, B Dallemagne
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
842 views
8 likes
3 comments
30:14
Gastrojejunal anastomosis resizing with Argon Plasma Coagulation (APC) and Apollo OverStitch™ endoscopic suturing system: live procedure
In 2004, a 57-year-old lady underwent a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) for morbid obesity. After the surgical intervention, she lost 13Kg and she started to regain weight back with a current BMI of 41.
During this live procedure, Professor Perretta performs a gastroscopy that shows a normal gastric pouch and a gastrojejunal anastomosis increased in caliber. The operator does an endoscopic resizing of the anastomosis with Argon Plasma Coagulation (APC) followed by the placement of an endoscopic suture with the Apollo OverStitch™ endoscopic suturing system.
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
Minimally invasive surgery is a field of continuous evolution and the advantages of this approach is no longer a matter of debate. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has shown to be the cornerstone in the treatment of morbid obesity and so far all the efforts in this technique have been conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Nowadays, reduced port surgery is regaining momentum as the evolution of minimally invasive surgery.
The purpose is to describe our technique of LRYGB, which mimics all the fundamental aspects of the “simplified gastric bypass” described by A. Cardoso Ramos et al. in a conventional laparoscopic surgical approach (5 ports) while incorporating some innovative technical features to reduce the quantity of ports. Despite the use of only three trocars, there is no problem with exposure or ergonomics, which represent major drawbacks when performing reduced port surgery.

Our technique can be a useful and feasible tool in selected patients in order to minimize parietal trauma and its possible complications, to improve cosmetic results, and to indirectly avoid the need for a second assistant, thereby improving the logistics, team dynamics, and economic aspects of the procedure.

In our experience, this technique is indicated as primary surgery in patients without previous surgery and with a BMI ranging from 35 to 50. Major contraindications are liver steatosis, superobese patients, and potentially revisional surgery. Although based on the experience of the team, we had also to perform revisional surgery mostly from ring vertical gastroplasty.

From January 2015 to June 2017, we analyzed 72 consecutive cases in our institution with a mean initial BMI of 43.12 (range: 30.1-58.7) using this approach, and the mean operative time was 64.77 minutes (range: 30-155, n=72) and excluding revisional cases or cases associated with cholecystectomy (58.72 min, range: 30-104, n=62).

This approach should be performed by highly skilled surgeons experienced with conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and with one of the patients feeling particularly comfortable. We strongly suggest using additional trocars if patient safety is jeopardized.
D Lipski, D Garcilazo Arismendi, S Targa
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
4542 views
432 likes
0 comments
07:37
Advanced bariatric surgery: reduced port simplified gastric bypass, a reproducible 3-port technique
Minimally invasive surgery is a field of continuous evolution and the advantages of this approach is no longer a matter of debate. The laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) has shown to be the cornerstone in the treatment of morbid obesity and so far all the efforts in this technique have been conducted to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Nowadays, reduced port surgery is regaining momentum as the evolution of minimally invasive surgery.
The purpose is to describe our technique of LRYGB, which mimics all the fundamental aspects of the “simplified gastric bypass” described by A. Cardoso Ramos et al. in a conventional laparoscopic surgical approach (5 ports) while incorporating some innovative technical features to reduce the quantity of ports. Despite the use of only three trocars, there is no problem with exposure or ergonomics, which represent major drawbacks when performing reduced port surgery.

Our technique can be a useful and feasible tool in selected patients in order to minimize parietal trauma and its possible complications, to improve cosmetic results, and to indirectly avoid the need for a second assistant, thereby improving the logistics, team dynamics, and economic aspects of the procedure.

In our experience, this technique is indicated as primary surgery in patients without previous surgery and with a BMI ranging from 35 to 50. Major contraindications are liver steatosis, superobese patients, and potentially revisional surgery. Although based on the experience of the team, we had also to perform revisional surgery mostly from ring vertical gastroplasty.

From January 2015 to June 2017, we analyzed 72 consecutive cases in our institution with a mean initial BMI of 43.12 (range: 30.1-58.7) using this approach, and the mean operative time was 64.77 minutes (range: 30-155, n=72) and excluding revisional cases or cases associated with cholecystectomy (58.72 min, range: 30-104, n=62).

This approach should be performed by highly skilled surgeons experienced with conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and with one of the patients feeling particularly comfortable. We strongly suggest using additional trocars if patient safety is jeopardized.
Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.
A Laranjeira, S Silva, M Amaro, M Carvalho, J Caravana
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2311 views
418 likes
0 comments
08:33
Laparoscopic gastric bypass with unexpected intestinal malrotation
There are only a few descriptions of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) in the setting of intestinal malrotation and these are limited to clinical case reports. Intestinal malrotations usually present in the first months of life with symptoms of bowel obstruction. However, in rare cases, it can persist undetected into adulthood when it could be incidentally identified. The anatomical abnormalities which should alert us to this possibility are an absent duodenojejunal angle, the small bowel on the right side of the abdomen, the caecum on the left, and the absence of a transverse colon crossing the abdomen. Identification and adjustment of the surgical technique at the time of laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is crucial to prevent a very distal RYGB or avoid confusion between the Roux limb and the common channel. The construction of the laparoscopic Roux limb can be safely performed with adjustments to the standard technique.
We present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a long history of morbid obesity, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia. The patient had no complaints and presented a normal preoperative evaluation. After a multidisciplinary evaluation, she was elected to undergo a LRYGB. We report an intestinal malrotation discovered at the time of LRYGB, and detail the incidental findings and the technical aspects which require to be incorporated in order to complete the operation safely.