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Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: surgical pitfalls in a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Professor Himpens presents the case of a 34-year-old female patient (BMI of 41) with a history of morbid obesity since adolescence. She will undergo a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The preoperative work-up was normal. She had lost 2Kg six months before the procedure. Nowadays, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is one of the most commonly performed bariatric procedures. Surgical pitfalls are emphasized during the video to make sure that LSG is achieved adequately and to prevent any potential complications. In addition, trocars placement, location of the first firing of the linear stapler, the reasons why oversewing of the staple line is not performed, and thrombosis prophylaxis are also discussed during the procedure.
J Himpens, M Ignat, R Rodriguez Luna
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
1110 views
20 likes
0 comments
39:06
Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy: surgical pitfalls in a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Professor Himpens presents the case of a 34-year-old female patient (BMI of 41) with a history of morbid obesity since adolescence. She will undergo a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG). The preoperative work-up was normal. She had lost 2Kg six months before the procedure. Nowadays, laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) is one of the most commonly performed bariatric procedures. Surgical pitfalls are emphasized during the video to make sure that LSG is achieved adequately and to prevent any potential complications. In addition, trocars placement, location of the first firing of the linear stapler, the reasons why oversewing of the staple line is not performed, and thrombosis prophylaxis are also discussed during the procedure.
Robot-assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypass using the latest generation of robotic surgical system: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Vieira d'Almeida outlines surgical pitfalls when performing a 5-port Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) using the da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system (Intuitive Surgical). During the video, a comparison is made with other robotic platforms (e.g. da Vinci Si™ system) regarding trocar placement, robotic docking, dexterity, instruments quality, and the introduction of fluorescence systems. Technical steps are provided to create a RYGB with a 100cm alimentary limb and a 150cm biliary limb, transection of the greater omentum, Petersen’s defect and mesenteric defect closure, which are performed routinely.
LA Vieira d'Almeida, M Ignat, R Rodriguez Luna
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
458 views
10 likes
0 comments
09:59
Robot-assisted Roux-en-Y gastric bypass using the latest generation of robotic surgical system: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Vieira d'Almeida outlines surgical pitfalls when performing a 5-port Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) using the da Vinci Xi™ robotic surgical system (Intuitive Surgical). During the video, a comparison is made with other robotic platforms (e.g. da Vinci Si™ system) regarding trocar placement, robotic docking, dexterity, instruments quality, and the introduction of fluorescence systems. Technical steps are provided to create a RYGB with a 100cm alimentary limb and a 150cm biliary limb, transection of the greater omentum, Petersen’s defect and mesenteric defect closure, which are performed routinely.
A standardized step-by-step description of a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Almino Cardoso Ramos shows the case of a morbidly obese 42-year-old woman with a BMI of 41. In the preoperative work-up, the patient lost 4kg. Imaging studies showed normal anatomy and did not evidence any hiatal hernia or GERD. Manometry did not show any motility disorders.
During the procedure, surgical pitfalls are highlighted and discussed in order to create a standardized Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with a biliopancreatic limb of 150cm and an alimentary limb of 100cm. Anatomical landmarks for gastric pouch creation are demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the adequate length measurement for both the biliopancreatic and alimentary limbs in order to ensure weight loss. The author also stresses the necessity to use appropriate staplers along with the ways to prevent stapler-related complications. He outlines his preference for specific suture material to close the enterotomy, and provides tips and tricks for the closure of the mesenteric defect and of Petersen’s space.
A Cardoso Ramos, M Ignat, R Rodriguez Luna
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
691 views
10 likes
0 comments
12:49
A standardized step-by-step description of a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: a live educational procedure
In this live educational video, Dr. Almino Cardoso Ramos shows the case of a morbidly obese 42-year-old woman with a BMI of 41. In the preoperative work-up, the patient lost 4kg. Imaging studies showed normal anatomy and did not evidence any hiatal hernia or GERD. Manometry did not show any motility disorders.
During the procedure, surgical pitfalls are highlighted and discussed in order to create a standardized Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) with a biliopancreatic limb of 150cm and an alimentary limb of 100cm. Anatomical landmarks for gastric pouch creation are demonstrated. Emphasis is put on the adequate length measurement for both the biliopancreatic and alimentary limbs in order to ensure weight loss. The author also stresses the necessity to use appropriate staplers along with the ways to prevent stapler-related complications. He outlines his preference for specific suture material to close the enterotomy, and provides tips and tricks for the closure of the mesenteric defect and of Petersen’s space.
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG): live educational procedure with resolution of device-related complication
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG) is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system (OverStitch™, Apollo Endosurgery, Austin, TX) mounted on a dual-channel gastroscope (GIF- 2TH180, Olympus, Center Valley, PA) allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to obtain gastric volume reduction and shrinking. The number of applied sutures relies on the gastric volume. Sutures are placed starting from the incisura to the fundus that is spared in a U-shaped fashion. A tissue-retracting helix device is used to grab the gastric wall. In this live educational video, Professor Silvana Perretta presented the case of a morbidly obese 38-year-old female patient with a BMI of 36.72kg/m2.
The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. An Overtube™ (Apollo Endosurgery, Austin, TX) was placed at the beginning of the procedure to protect the airways, the esophagus, and the hypopharynx. Each purse-string suture consisted of 6 to 8 full-thickness bites starting first on the anterior gastric wall, then on the greater curvature, and the posterior wall and moving backward in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device (EndoCinch™). During the live procedure, a complication occurred due to an excessive pressure placed on the EndoCinch™ handle which caused a break of the collar part of the cinch. The management of this complication was achieved by cutting the suture, so that the collar part of the cinch which grasped the mucosa could be detached with a grasper to allow for suture replacement. A total of 4 sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization.
S Perretta, L Guerriero, M Pizzicannella, R Rodriguez Luna, B Dallemagne
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
448 views
7 likes
2 comments
52:53
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG): live educational procedure with resolution of device-related complication
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG) is a novel endobariatric procedure with a mechanism of action totally different from the one used for a standard sleeve gastrectomy. An over-the-scope suturing system (OverStitch™, Apollo Endosurgery, Austin, TX) mounted on a dual-channel gastroscope (GIF- 2TH180, Olympus, Center Valley, PA) allowed to place full-thickness sutures in order to obtain gastric volume reduction and shrinking. The number of applied sutures relies on the gastric volume. Sutures are placed starting from the incisura to the fundus that is spared in a U-shaped fashion. A tissue-retracting helix device is used to grab the gastric wall. In this live educational video, Professor Silvana Perretta presented the case of a morbidly obese 38-year-old female patient with a BMI of 36.72kg/m2.
The procedure was performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. An Overtube™ (Apollo Endosurgery, Austin, TX) was placed at the beginning of the procedure to protect the airways, the esophagus, and the hypopharynx. Each purse-string suture consisted of 6 to 8 full-thickness bites starting first on the anterior gastric wall, then on the greater curvature, and the posterior wall and moving backward in the opposite direction. Once completed, the suture was tied and knotted using a cinching device (EndoCinch™). During the live procedure, a complication occurred due to an excessive pressure placed on the EndoCinch™ handle which caused a break of the collar part of the cinch. The management of this complication was achieved by cutting the suture, so that the collar part of the cinch which grasped the mucosa could be detached with a grasper to allow for suture replacement. A total of 4 sutures were applied in order to obtain gastric tubulization.
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG): live procedure
In this live procedure, Professor Perretta performs an endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG) using the OverStitch™ endoscopic suturing system (Apollo Endosurgery) in a 50-year-old obese male patient (with a BMI of 35.3). In this particular case, preoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed a Barrett’s esophagus with positive histology for intestinal metaplasia, which is not a contraindication for this kind of endoscopic intervention. ESG is performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. The supine position is preferred because it is safer than the left lateral decubitus position as it allows for a better exposure of the stomach. Sutures are placed in a U-shaped fashion from the incisura angularis to the fundus, which is spared using the OverStitch™ suturing system, mounted on a double channel Olympus scope. The system allows for the placement of durable full-thickness stitches to obtain gastric volume reduction and shrinking.
S Perretta, M Pizzicannella, B Dallemagne
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
644 views
10 likes
1 comment
38:23
Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG): live procedure
In this live procedure, Professor Perretta performs an endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG) using the OverStitch™ endoscopic suturing system (Apollo Endosurgery) in a 50-year-old obese male patient (with a BMI of 35.3). In this particular case, preoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) showed a Barrett’s esophagus with positive histology for intestinal metaplasia, which is not a contraindication for this kind of endoscopic intervention. ESG is performed with the patient under general anesthesia and carbon dioxide insufflation. The supine position is preferred because it is safer than the left lateral decubitus position as it allows for a better exposure of the stomach. Sutures are placed in a U-shaped fashion from the incisura angularis to the fundus, which is spared using the OverStitch™ suturing system, mounted on a double channel Olympus scope. The system allows for the placement of durable full-thickness stitches to obtain gastric volume reduction and shrinking.
Innovative technologies: robotic bariatric surgery
In this key lecture, Professor Leon Katz outlines innovative technologies in robotic bariatric surgery.
Dr. Leon Katz, a bariatric robotic surgeon, talks about the former limitations of robotic platforms and how recent technological developments have led to the creation of a new kind of platforms which offer a quick and simple docking process, greater flexibility of movements on surgical tables, less invasive accesses, and a greater versatility of instruments. Finally, with reference clinical cases, he illustrates the usefulness of robotic platforms in complex and challenging situations, in which they not only allow greater precision of surgical gestures, but also provide additional advantages for educational purposes.
L Katz
Lecture
5 months ago
140 views
2 likes
0 comments
12:46
Innovative technologies: robotic bariatric surgery
In this key lecture, Professor Leon Katz outlines innovative technologies in robotic bariatric surgery.
Dr. Leon Katz, a bariatric robotic surgeon, talks about the former limitations of robotic platforms and how recent technological developments have led to the creation of a new kind of platforms which offer a quick and simple docking process, greater flexibility of movements on surgical tables, less invasive accesses, and a greater versatility of instruments. Finally, with reference clinical cases, he illustrates the usefulness of robotic platforms in complex and challenging situations, in which they not only allow greater precision of surgical gestures, but also provide additional advantages for educational purposes.
Metabolic/bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes
In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Buchwald focuses on metabolic and bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes.
Through a valuable account of the historical evolution of the concept of metabolic surgery, Dr. Henry Buchwald, Professor of surgery and biomedical engineering as well as Owen and Sarah Davidson Wangensteen Chair in Experimental Surgery Emeritus at the University of Minnesota shows us the important role that different surgical procedures, both bariatric and non-bariatric, have played in the treatment of diverse metabolic pathologies, especially in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, emphasizing the rich and intense research activity which has generated this progress and the future of surgery in the treatment of chronic metabolic diseases.
H Buchwald
Lecture
5 months ago
270 views
2 likes
0 comments
23:01
Metabolic/bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes
In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Buchwald focuses on metabolic and bariatric surgery for type 2 diabetes.
Through a valuable account of the historical evolution of the concept of metabolic surgery, Dr. Henry Buchwald, Professor of surgery and biomedical engineering as well as Owen and Sarah Davidson Wangensteen Chair in Experimental Surgery Emeritus at the University of Minnesota shows us the important role that different surgical procedures, both bariatric and non-bariatric, have played in the treatment of diverse metabolic pathologies, especially in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, emphasizing the rich and intense research activity which has generated this progress and the future of surgery in the treatment of chronic metabolic diseases.
Laparoscopic Biliopancreatic Diversion with Duodenal Switch (BPD/DS)
Morbid obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) is the most effective bariatric surgery procedure for weight loss. This procedure was first described by Scopinaro in 1979. It consisted of a horizontal gastrectomy, a transection of the bowel halfway from the ligament of Treitz and the ileocecal junction, and a Roux-en-Y reconstruction with a 50cm common channel. This was later modified: the duodenal switch was added and the gastrectomy was performed in a vertical sleeve fashion, thereby preserving the pylorus and increasing the common channel to 100cm. This modification greatly reduced the incidence of marginal ulceration, dumping, and nutritional deficiencies. However, this operation is still uncommon due to the perceived technical difficulty and risk of nutritional morbidity. This video demonstrates a standardized technique for this complex procedure.
RC Pullatt
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
4369 views
17 likes
4 comments
13:00
Laparoscopic Biliopancreatic Diversion with Duodenal Switch (BPD/DS)
Morbid obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Biliopancreatic diversion with duodenal switch (BPD-DS) is the most effective bariatric surgery procedure for weight loss. This procedure was first described by Scopinaro in 1979. It consisted of a horizontal gastrectomy, a transection of the bowel halfway from the ligament of Treitz and the ileocecal junction, and a Roux-en-Y reconstruction with a 50cm common channel. This was later modified: the duodenal switch was added and the gastrectomy was performed in a vertical sleeve fashion, thereby preserving the pylorus and increasing the common channel to 100cm. This modification greatly reduced the incidence of marginal ulceration, dumping, and nutritional deficiencies. However, this operation is still uncommon due to the perceived technical difficulty and risk of nutritional morbidity. This video demonstrates a standardized technique for this complex procedure.
Fully robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is becoming increasingly popular. The use of the surgical robot is developing rapidly, and this is especially true for digestive surgery. The aim of this video is to show that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be performed using a totally robotic approach. When using the robot, one follows the same steps as for a conventional intervention. The 3D vision and the degrees of freedom of the instruments facilitate the dissection, especially around the cardia, and for suturing procedures. The surgeon takes advantage of the console's user friendly set-up which does not put his/her shoulders or back in a vulnerable position, as they sometimes are when using a laparoscopic approach.
M Vix, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1802 views
8 likes
0 comments
12:00
Fully robotic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is becoming increasingly popular. The use of the surgical robot is developing rapidly, and this is especially true for digestive surgery. The aim of this video is to show that Roux-en-Y gastric bypass can be performed using a totally robotic approach. When using the robot, one follows the same steps as for a conventional intervention. The 3D vision and the degrees of freedom of the instruments facilitate the dissection, especially around the cardia, and for suturing procedures. The surgeon takes advantage of the console's user friendly set-up which does not put his/her shoulders or back in a vulnerable position, as they sometimes are when using a laparoscopic approach.
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.
J Magalhães, AM Pereira, T Fonseca, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2080 views
5 likes
0 comments
09:34
Laparoscopic revision of Nissen fundoplication to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Obesity is a known etiological factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and is also a growing public health concern. Although Nissen fundoplication is a highly effective technique to treat GERD, it may fail in obese patients. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass provides excellent long-term control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss.
Clinical case: A 57-year-old woman underwent a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for GERD (BMI 30.0 Kg/m2) with excellent outcomes during the first postoperative year in 2011. Two years later, GERD symptoms recurred, and her weight increased progressively (BMI of 36.0 Kg/m2). The patient was proposed to a laparoscopic conversion of Nissen fundoplication to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The procedure was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. One year later, she remained asymptomatic, off antacids medication, and with her weight decreased to 63.5Kg which corresponded to a BMI of 25.4 Kg/m2.
Discussion/conclusion: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass successfully reduces GERD symptoms by diverting bile away from the esophagus, decreasing acid production in the gastric pouch, therefore limiting the amount of acid reflux and by promoting weight loss decreases abdominal pressure over the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal hiatus. In obese patients (BMI>35) with GERD, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the most effective and advantageous treatment since it provides control of GERD symptoms with the additional benefit of weight loss. In patients who have previously undergone anti-reflux surgery, bariatric surgery can be technically demanding. However, if performed by high-volume surgeons in high-volume centers, it is perfectly feasible with low morbidity and excellent results.