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Winslow's hiatal hernia: laparoscopic treatment
Less than 200 cases of internal hernia have been described through the hiatus of Winslow, usually related to congenital or acquired anatomical defects. The most frequent affectation corresponds to the colon, small intestine and, rarely, to the gallbladder. There is usually occlusion with variable grade ischemia, but it can also occur as obstructive jaundice, biliary colic, secondary pancreatitis and non-symptomatic herniation.
The association of Winslow’s hiatus hernia with various anatomical abnormalities (high or subhepatic caecum, mobile ascending colon, large and long colonic mesentery, etc.) may actually correspond to different degrees of intestinal malrotation and, although the diagnosis of “malrotation” is not usually specified, we believe that this could underlie part of Winslow’s hiatus hernia associated with non-acquired anatomical defects.
Hiatal hernia corresponds to 0.2-0.9% of all cases of intestinal obstruction, of which 8% are from Winslow’s hiatus. If pre-surgical diagnosis is difficult, it occurs in less than 10% of cases.
Mortality is around 50% when it has vascular implication. We have not thought of applying the omentum to seal the defect because we did not have adequate surgical anchor sites since we were working millimeters from the vena cava, extrahepatic bile duct, duodenum, and perirenal area. We decided to fix the colon from the hepatic flexure to the right iliac fossa with continuous stitches, from the colonic serosa to Toldt’s fascia, as it is from the embryonic stage.
JL Limon Aguilar, CO Castillo Cabrera
Surgical intervention
4 days ago
162 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:56
Winslow's hiatal hernia: laparoscopic treatment
Less than 200 cases of internal hernia have been described through the hiatus of Winslow, usually related to congenital or acquired anatomical defects. The most frequent affectation corresponds to the colon, small intestine and, rarely, to the gallbladder. There is usually occlusion with variable grade ischemia, but it can also occur as obstructive jaundice, biliary colic, secondary pancreatitis and non-symptomatic herniation.
The association of Winslow’s hiatus hernia with various anatomical abnormalities (high or subhepatic caecum, mobile ascending colon, large and long colonic mesentery, etc.) may actually correspond to different degrees of intestinal malrotation and, although the diagnosis of “malrotation” is not usually specified, we believe that this could underlie part of Winslow’s hiatus hernia associated with non-acquired anatomical defects.
Hiatal hernia corresponds to 0.2-0.9% of all cases of intestinal obstruction, of which 8% are from Winslow’s hiatus. If pre-surgical diagnosis is difficult, it occurs in less than 10% of cases.
Mortality is around 50% when it has vascular implication. We have not thought of applying the omentum to seal the defect because we did not have adequate surgical anchor sites since we were working millimeters from the vena cava, extrahepatic bile duct, duodenum, and perirenal area. We decided to fix the colon from the hepatic flexure to the right iliac fossa with continuous stitches, from the colonic serosa to Toldt’s fascia, as it is from the embryonic stage.
Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
L Marano, A Spaziani, G Castagnoli
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
1695 views
8 likes
0 comments
07:00
Robotic Nissen fundoplication with the da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system
For a long time, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication has been used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The main challenges of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication involve the 2-dimensional visualization, exposure of complex gastroesophageal anatomy, and suturing of the wrap fundoplication. In 1999, robotic Nissen fundoplication, a completely new technique, was introduced, demonstrating advantages over conventional laparoscopic surgery due to improved manual dexterity, ergonomics, and 3-dimensional visualization. However, time spent on robotic platform docking and arm clashing during the procedure are factors that surgeons often find cumbersome and time-consuming. The newest surgical platform, the da Vinci Xi surgical robotic system, can help to overcome such problems. This video shows a stepwise approach of the da Vinci Xi docking process and surgical technique demonstrating fundoplication according to the Nissen technique.
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
C Viana, M Lozano, D Poletto, T Moreno, C Varela, A Toscano
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3762 views
10 likes
1 comment
15:27
Giant hiatal hernia: pleural incision helping defect closure without tension
Incidence of hiatal hernias (HH) increases with age. Approximately 60% of persons aged over 50 have a HH. Most of them are asymptomatic patients and may be discovered incidentally; others may be symptomatic and their presentation differs depending on hernia type.
We present the case of a 65-year-old woman, complaining of abdominal pain and vomiting. CT-scan showed a giant hiatal sliding hernia with almost the whole stomach in an intrathoracic position. Surgery was put forward to the patient for HH correction and Nissen procedure and she accepted it.
Although a uniform definition does not exist, a giant HH is considered a hernia which includes at least 30% of the stomach in the chest. Usually, a giant HH is a type III hernia with a sliding and paraesophageal component, and consequently patients may complain of pain, heartburn, dysphagia, and vomiting. Surgery ordinarily includes four steps: hernia sac dissection and resection, esophageal mobilization, crural repair, and fundoplication. To prevent tension due to a large hiatus, relaxation of the diaphragmatic crura can be associated with the use of a mesh. However, mesh use is still a matter of debate because of severe associated complications, such as erosions requiring gastric resection. In this case, we decided to deliberately make a pleural incision, in order to reduce tension preventing the use of a mesh with all of its potential complications. This procedure, already described by some authors, is not associated with respiratory complications because of the difference in abdominal and respiratory pressures observed in laparoscopic surgery. The patient progressed favorably and was discharged asymptomatically on postoperative day 2.
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1040 views
352 likes
0 comments
21:18
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: paraesophageal hernia repair: critical value of extrasaccular approach
Paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair is a challenging procedure. Repositioning of the herniated stomach and the reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory in order to decrease the risk of recurrence. The dissection and reduction of the sac must be performed following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it must be carried out outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Recurrence is also related to the type of crural repair performed, some authors advocating the systematic use of prosthetic or biological reinforcement. In this video, we present a PEH repair and cruroplasty protected with an absorbable mesh and contemporary Nissen fundoplication.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, M Diana, F Longo, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5976 views
441 likes
0 comments
54:47
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: paraesophageal hernia repair: critical value of extrasaccular approach
Paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair is a challenging procedure. Repositioning of the herniated stomach and the reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory in order to decrease the risk of recurrence. The dissection and reduction of the sac must be performed following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it must be carried out outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Recurrence is also related to the type of crural repair performed, some authors advocating the systematic use of prosthetic or biological reinforcement. In this video, we present a PEH repair and cruroplasty protected with an absorbable mesh and contemporary Nissen fundoplication.
Concurrent laparoscopic RYGB with a paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair
This is the case of a 75-year old female patient with a medical history of bilateral mastectomy due to cancer, which occurred 30 and 15 years before referral. She was treated using adjuvant chemotherapy (tamoxifen) and radiotherapy, and had a liver-related kidney donation. The patient was found asymptomatic when she underwent a control abdominal ultrasound, which showed a 6cm hepatic mass in liver segments V and VI. A hepatic MRI was performed and showed a single liver lesion (68mm in diameter) located in the right liver lobe, and a PET-CT-scan demonstrated an increased hypermetabolic activity of the lesion without other systemic tumor dissemination. A laparoscopic right hepatectomy was scheduled. A laparoscopic surgery was performed. Laparoscopic exploration revealed multiple bilateral lesions, and an intraoperative ultrasound demonstrated a lesion in liver segment IV. An ALPPS approach was considered.
There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day.
A Duro, F Wright, PJ Castellaro, A Beskow, D Cavadas, J Montagné
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1109 views
180 likes
0 comments
06:23
Concurrent laparoscopic RYGB with a paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair
This is the case of a 75-year old female patient with a medical history of bilateral mastectomy due to cancer, which occurred 30 and 15 years before referral. She was treated using adjuvant chemotherapy (tamoxifen) and radiotherapy, and had a liver-related kidney donation. The patient was found asymptomatic when she underwent a control abdominal ultrasound, which showed a 6cm hepatic mass in liver segments V and VI. A hepatic MRI was performed and showed a single liver lesion (68mm in diameter) located in the right liver lobe, and a PET-CT-scan demonstrated an increased hypermetabolic activity of the lesion without other systemic tumor dissemination. A laparoscopic right hepatectomy was scheduled. A laparoscopic surgery was performed. Laparoscopic exploration revealed multiple bilateral lesions, and an intraoperative ultrasound demonstrated a lesion in liver segment IV. An ALPPS approach was considered.
There were no complications and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day.
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
A Trovão, L Costa, M Costa, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
678 views
105 likes
0 comments
09:55
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.
S Holland-Cunz
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2216 views
208 likes
0 comments
03:54
Pediatric laparoscopic floppy Nissen fundoplication
Surgical therapy is well-established in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It is known that the laparoscopic approach is safe and effective. We tailored our surgical strategy based on two main studies which we conducted: one observational long-term follow-up and the other one related to the effect of Thal fundoplication on pulmonary affections. Our conclusions are summarized as follows:
- no surgery in the first 12 months,
- indications determined together with the consent of parents,
- a radiological contrast study should always be performed preoperatively,
- history taking and at least two positive objective diagnoses leading to indication,
- for neurologically impaired patients, a Nissen fundoplication is selected,
- first-line treatment: percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) implantation, second step: fundoplication if necessary,
- for neurologically healthy patients without inborn anatomical diseases, a Thal fundoplication is selected,
- postoperative diagnoses in the follow-up period are only performed if necessary.
For this personal experience and in comparison with the established approach in the current literature, we have only poor evidence. It is due to the lack of prospective studies available and to an inadequate number of patients, which is typical in pediatric studies.
Relaxing incision for crural repair in type III paraesophageal hernia
This video shows the laparoscopic repair of a large type III paraesophageal hernia in a 55-year-old woman. After dissection of the hernia sac, partial resection is performed. Very high intramediastinal dissection of the esophagus is performed, taking special care not to injure the posterior and anterior vagal trunk. First, as the hiatal defect is very large, a right relaxing incision is performed. The crural repair is performed by interrupted Ethibond® 2/0 stitches buttressed with a polypropylene mesh. Finally, the diaphragmatic defect is covered with a non-reabsorbable mesh (Physiomesh™) and a 180-degree posterior fundoplication is performed.
P Vorwald, G Salcedo, M Posada, C Lévano Linares, ML Sánchez de Molina, R Restrepo, C Ferrero
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2140 views
79 likes
0 comments
09:13
Relaxing incision for crural repair in type III paraesophageal hernia
This video shows the laparoscopic repair of a large type III paraesophageal hernia in a 55-year-old woman. After dissection of the hernia sac, partial resection is performed. Very high intramediastinal dissection of the esophagus is performed, taking special care not to injure the posterior and anterior vagal trunk. First, as the hiatal defect is very large, a right relaxing incision is performed. The crural repair is performed by interrupted Ethibond® 2/0 stitches buttressed with a polypropylene mesh. Finally, the diaphragmatic defect is covered with a non-reabsorbable mesh (Physiomesh™) and a 180-degree posterior fundoplication is performed.
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1000 views
33 likes
0 comments
12:26
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, S Tzedakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
8507 views
289 likes
0 comments
16:21
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
Endoscope-guided Nissen fundoplication
Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is a common and almost endemic problem in the Western world. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery is an effective and durable treatment for GERD in patients who are well-selected. Selection depends on a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough physiologic evaluation with endoscopy, pH-monitoring and esophageal manometry. In more advanced and difficult cases, additional tests may be indicated. Cases encountered in practice range from straight forward and "everyday" to extremely complex and difficult; both in the decision-making, the operation, and the patient management. The common thread between all cases of anti-reflux surgery, complex or simple, is a stepwise and organized approach that takes into consideration the individual patient's disease and physiology. We present a case in this video that is not complex but which provides a good illustration of the technical steps required to recreate an effective gastroesophageal valve. We emphasize an atraumatic and efficient approach to the operation that ensures optimal outcomes and will minimize intraoperative complications. We discuss the characteristics of a properly formed fundoplication and debate with other experts some of the minor technical details such as suture patterns and materials. We also show how intraoperative endoscopy can serve as a powerful tool for quality control and postulate that surgeons can improve their results if they adopt routine interoperative control by endoscopy. We hope that you will enjoy and benefit from this case…
LL Swanström, A D'Urso, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2591 views
124 likes
0 comments
36:15
Endoscope-guided Nissen fundoplication
Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is a common and almost endemic problem in the Western world. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery is an effective and durable treatment for GERD in patients who are well-selected. Selection depends on a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough physiologic evaluation with endoscopy, pH-monitoring and esophageal manometry. In more advanced and difficult cases, additional tests may be indicated. Cases encountered in practice range from straight forward and "everyday" to extremely complex and difficult; both in the decision-making, the operation, and the patient management. The common thread between all cases of anti-reflux surgery, complex or simple, is a stepwise and organized approach that takes into consideration the individual patient's disease and physiology. We present a case in this video that is not complex but which provides a good illustration of the technical steps required to recreate an effective gastroesophageal valve. We emphasize an atraumatic and efficient approach to the operation that ensures optimal outcomes and will minimize intraoperative complications. We discuss the characteristics of a properly formed fundoplication and debate with other experts some of the minor technical details such as suture patterns and materials. We also show how intraoperative endoscopy can serve as a powerful tool for quality control and postulate that surgeons can improve their results if they adopt routine interoperative control by endoscopy. We hope that you will enjoy and benefit from this case…
Laparoscopic redo Nissen posterior fundoplication
This video shows a reintervention after laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti due to failure of the technique in a 70-year-old woman presenting with a history of dysphagia and weight loss beginning short after surgery.
First, dissection of the fundic wrap and esophageal hiatus are completed in order to expose specific anatomical landmarks that would help us understand the possible causes for the failure of the first procedure.
The original fundoplication is then unwrapped, rearranging it to the original anatomical position. This maneuver allows us to understand the causes for the technique’s failure, which can be accounted for by the asymmetrical position of the fundoplication caused by a series of elements. First, the short gastric vessels were not dissected during the first surgery, this probably contributed to the malposition of the right flap, which emerges from the posterior mid-stomach wall, distal to the fundus. On the other hand, the right flap emerges from the para-esophageal proximal edge of the lesser curvature; this causes the “valve” to be angulated and rotated clockwise, “hiding” the fundoplication on the posterior gastric wall.
To complete the procedure, a Toupet fundoplication is performed as a substituting anti-reflux technique.
P Vorwald, E York Pineda, E Bernal, M Posada, S Ayora González, R Restrepo
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
3698 views
74 likes
0 comments
10:37
Laparoscopic redo Nissen posterior fundoplication
This video shows a reintervention after laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti due to failure of the technique in a 70-year-old woman presenting with a history of dysphagia and weight loss beginning short after surgery.
First, dissection of the fundic wrap and esophageal hiatus are completed in order to expose specific anatomical landmarks that would help us understand the possible causes for the failure of the first procedure.
The original fundoplication is then unwrapped, rearranging it to the original anatomical position. This maneuver allows us to understand the causes for the technique’s failure, which can be accounted for by the asymmetrical position of the fundoplication caused by a series of elements. First, the short gastric vessels were not dissected during the first surgery, this probably contributed to the malposition of the right flap, which emerges from the posterior mid-stomach wall, distal to the fundus. On the other hand, the right flap emerges from the para-esophageal proximal edge of the lesser curvature; this causes the “valve” to be angulated and rotated clockwise, “hiding” the fundoplication on the posterior gastric wall.
To complete the procedure, a Toupet fundoplication is performed as a substituting anti-reflux technique.
Laparoscopic partial fundoplication in a patient with scleroderma and severe GERD
Scleroderma is associated with severe esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results after antireflux surgery have been suboptimal due to the profound esophageal dysmotility observed in this disease.

Here, we show the case of a 54-year-old patient with scleroderma and severe GERD. The patient presented with both typical GERD symptoms, persistent cough unresponsive to high dose of PPIs, and dysphagia to solids. Preoperative work-up included high-resolution (HR) manometry, which showed a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and severely impaired peristalsis as well as impedance pH monitoring, which confirmed the presence of pathological reflux, mainly acid, occurring mostly at night in a recumbent position.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
3429 views
36 likes
0 comments
09:11
Laparoscopic partial fundoplication in a patient with scleroderma and severe GERD
Scleroderma is associated with severe esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results after antireflux surgery have been suboptimal due to the profound esophageal dysmotility observed in this disease.

Here, we show the case of a 54-year-old patient with scleroderma and severe GERD. The patient presented with both typical GERD symptoms, persistent cough unresponsive to high dose of PPIs, and dysphagia to solids. Preoperative work-up included high-resolution (HR) manometry, which showed a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and severely impaired peristalsis as well as impedance pH monitoring, which confirmed the presence of pathological reflux, mainly acid, occurring mostly at night in a recumbent position.