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Robotically assisted right colectomy with fluorescence-guided complete mesocolon excision
In robotic right hemicolectomy for cancer, appropriate lymphadenectomy and anastomotic leak prevention are critical. Visualization of draining lymph nodes, of primary tumor site and blood flow using the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence da Vinci® imaging system is a recent development.
We present the technique of robotic right colectomy with complete mesocolic excision (CME) and D3 lymphadenectomy using Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence.
The day before surgery, a colonoscopy was performed and ICG was injected around the tumor in the submucosa.
Robotic right hemicolectomy was performed with suprapubic trocars layout and bottom to up dissection, with CME, central vessel ligation, and D3 lymphadenectomy.
ICG was intraoperatively administered intravenously to assess bowel perfusion before anastomosis. The identification of the primary tumor site and of bowel stumps perfusion were possible and the accuracy in identifying the D3 lymphatic basin was high, allowing for an image-guided radical lymphadenectomy. Fluorescent technology represents a valuable innovation to improve colon cancer surgery.
W Petz, E Bertani, D Ribero, D Lo Conte, A Mellano, A Piccioli, S Borin, G Spinoglio
Surgical intervention
4 months ago
706 views
3 likes
0 comments
08:43
Robotically assisted right colectomy with fluorescence-guided complete mesocolon excision
In robotic right hemicolectomy for cancer, appropriate lymphadenectomy and anastomotic leak prevention are critical. Visualization of draining lymph nodes, of primary tumor site and blood flow using the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence da Vinci® imaging system is a recent development.
We present the technique of robotic right colectomy with complete mesocolic excision (CME) and D3 lymphadenectomy using Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence.
The day before surgery, a colonoscopy was performed and ICG was injected around the tumor in the submucosa.
Robotic right hemicolectomy was performed with suprapubic trocars layout and bottom to up dissection, with CME, central vessel ligation, and D3 lymphadenectomy.
ICG was intraoperatively administered intravenously to assess bowel perfusion before anastomosis. The identification of the primary tumor site and of bowel stumps perfusion were possible and the accuracy in identifying the D3 lymphatic basin was high, allowing for an image-guided radical lymphadenectomy. Fluorescent technology represents a valuable innovation to improve colon cancer surgery.
Laparoscopic TME - The 6-step procedure
In this key lecture, Dr. Rullier describes a clear 6-step approach to perform a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME).
The first step is posterior dissection of the TME plane in the presacral space. Hereafter, a right lateral dissection is performed with sparing of the hypogastric nerves followed by anterior dissection and identification of the seminal vesicles and pelvic plexus. A left lateral dissection is then performed whereafter the planes are connected.
In this procedure, the 6 essential landmarks are the following: ''the presacral space, hypogastric nerves, seminal vesicles, pelvic plexus, levator ani muscles, and Denonvilliers' fascia and the prostate.’
E Rullier
Lecture
4 months ago
1432 views
20 likes
0 comments
09:16
Laparoscopic TME - The 6-step procedure
In this key lecture, Dr. Rullier describes a clear 6-step approach to perform a laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME).
The first step is posterior dissection of the TME plane in the presacral space. Hereafter, a right lateral dissection is performed with sparing of the hypogastric nerves followed by anterior dissection and identification of the seminal vesicles and pelvic plexus. A left lateral dissection is then performed whereafter the planes are connected.
In this procedure, the 6 essential landmarks are the following: ''the presacral space, hypogastric nerves, seminal vesicles, pelvic plexus, levator ani muscles, and Denonvilliers' fascia and the prostate.’
Transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer - Safe Transverse
In this key lecture, Dr. Armando Melani explains how transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is a doable and safe surgery, in his opinion and according to his experience.
Dr. Melani outlines the recommendations for a safe transverse colectomy and teaches us how to avoid lesions in the superior mesenteric vessels, shows laparoscopic mobilization for resection of the transverse colon due to cancer, and demonstrates an excellent vascular approach.
Finally, Dr. Melani provides the rationale of the extension of the LND for right colon cancer and gives a didactic demonstration in this video.
In conclusion, transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is relatively difficult. The reasons for this are the anatomical variations of middle colic vessels, transverse mesocolon attachments with the pancreatic head, and venous communications. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Melani demonstrates the laparoscopic approach and provides all recommendations to achieve a successful surgery.
A Melani
Lecture
4 months ago
696 views
1 like
0 comments
09:46
Transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer - Safe Transverse
In this key lecture, Dr. Armando Melani explains how transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is a doable and safe surgery, in his opinion and according to his experience.
Dr. Melani outlines the recommendations for a safe transverse colectomy and teaches us how to avoid lesions in the superior mesenteric vessels, shows laparoscopic mobilization for resection of the transverse colon due to cancer, and demonstrates an excellent vascular approach.
Finally, Dr. Melani provides the rationale of the extension of the LND for right colon cancer and gives a didactic demonstration in this video.
In conclusion, transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is relatively difficult. The reasons for this are the anatomical variations of middle colic vessels, transverse mesocolon attachments with the pancreatic head, and venous communications. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Melani demonstrates the laparoscopic approach and provides all recommendations to achieve a successful surgery.
A standardized approach for complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
In this key lecture, Dr. Antonello Forgione presents a clear and precise description of the most important anatomical points as well as the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision (CME) during a right laparoscopic colectomy, in cases of cancer.
As described in the video, four ports are used, all located on the left flank. A caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon is performed along the superior mesenteric vein to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, right and middle colic vessels in their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is completely dissected and the upper right colic vein is cut and divided. The transverse colon and the terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized, and the ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible and very useful. However, it is necessary to have an extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon, as well as an experience in advanced laparoscopic techniques to obtain the expected outcomes.
Finally, Dr. Forgione provides recommendations to perform the surgery in obese patients.
A Forgione
Lecture
4 months ago
512 views
4 likes
0 comments
14:20
A standardized approach for complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
In this key lecture, Dr. Antonello Forgione presents a clear and precise description of the most important anatomical points as well as the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision (CME) during a right laparoscopic colectomy, in cases of cancer.
As described in the video, four ports are used, all located on the left flank. A caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon is performed along the superior mesenteric vein to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, right and middle colic vessels in their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is completely dissected and the upper right colic vein is cut and divided. The transverse colon and the terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized, and the ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible and very useful. However, it is necessary to have an extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon, as well as an experience in advanced laparoscopic techniques to obtain the expected outcomes.
Finally, Dr. Forgione provides recommendations to perform the surgery in obese patients.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
S Macina, L Baldari, E Cassinotti, M Ballabio, A Spota, M de Francesco, L Boni
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
5148 views
25 likes
1 comment
07:10
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
E Soricelli, E Facchiano, L Leuratti, G Quartararo, N Console, P Tonelli, M Lucchese
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
4096 views
15 likes
0 comments
09:10
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
J Magalhães, C Osorio, L Frutuoso, AM Pereira, A Trovão, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6241 views
25 likes
1 comment
09:44
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3482 views
14 likes
5 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2996 views
10 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.