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Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis
The best surgical approach for splenic flexure tumors is not well defined yet.
The distal third of the transverse colon has an embryological origin in the hindgut, and the splenic flexure classically shows a dual lymphatic drainage, the proximal retropancreatic and the distal to the lymphatic pedicle of both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV). Nakagoe et al. showed that the majority of positive nodes have distal lymphatic spread to the paracolic archway and up to the origin of the left colic artery. Lymph nodes of the middle colic artery and its left branch are positive in a small percentage (0 and 4.2% respectively).
As a result, a left segmental colectomy is a valid option for splenic flexure and distal transverse colon tumors because it allows vascular ligation at the root of the vessels, dissection along the embryological planes, and adequate bowel margins from the tumor. The preservation of the IMV should reduce impaired venous drainage of the sigmoid colon, which can be associated with anastomotic leakage, without compromising complete mesocolic excision.
An intracorporeal anastomosis for left colonic resection may have the same advantages as for a right hemicolectomy, but can be technically more challenging.
This video shows a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis and preservation of the IMV for a tumor of the distal transverse colon.
A Canaveira Manso, M Rosete, R Nemésio, M Fernandes
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
1185 views
10 likes
0 comments
16:43
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis
The best surgical approach for splenic flexure tumors is not well defined yet.
The distal third of the transverse colon has an embryological origin in the hindgut, and the splenic flexure classically shows a dual lymphatic drainage, the proximal retropancreatic and the distal to the lymphatic pedicle of both the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) and the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV). Nakagoe et al. showed that the majority of positive nodes have distal lymphatic spread to the paracolic archway and up to the origin of the left colic artery. Lymph nodes of the middle colic artery and its left branch are positive in a small percentage (0 and 4.2% respectively).
As a result, a left segmental colectomy is a valid option for splenic flexure and distal transverse colon tumors because it allows vascular ligation at the root of the vessels, dissection along the embryological planes, and adequate bowel margins from the tumor. The preservation of the IMV should reduce impaired venous drainage of the sigmoid colon, which can be associated with anastomotic leakage, without compromising complete mesocolic excision.
An intracorporeal anastomosis for left colonic resection may have the same advantages as for a right hemicolectomy, but can be technically more challenging.
This video shows a laparoscopic left hemicolectomy with manual intracorporeal anastomosis and preservation of the IMV for a tumor of the distal transverse colon.
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with excision of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET)
Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare neoplasms, which account for less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors, with an incidence of 0.48 cases/100,000. They may be benign or malignant and tend to grow slower than exocrine tumors. They develop from the abnormal growth of endocrine cells in the pancreas and are either functional or nonfunctional, and may or may not cause signs or symptoms. Pancreatic NETs that have not spread outside the pancreas should be completely removed, if possible, because these tumors are more likely to be cured with surgery. This video shows a case of a pNET of the uncinate process, discovered in the study of a right colon cancer. Because of the small size of the pNET and its location, the association of a right laparoscopic hemicolectomy with a pancreatic tumor excision was deemed feasible. The mobilization of the mesenteric root allowed to identify the uncinate process and to prepare for the pNET excision. After the exposure of the duodenum and the retroperitoneal plane, the surgery continued with a right hemicolectomy and a complete mesocolic excision. An intracorporeal anastomosis was constructed and the surgical specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic incision. The pathological report revealed a T2N1 caecal adenocarcinoma and a G2 pNET.
A Canaveira Manso, M Rosete, R Nemésio, R Martins
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
393 views
3 likes
0 comments
17:16
Laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with excision of a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET)
Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are rare neoplasms, which account for less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors, with an incidence of 0.48 cases/100,000. They may be benign or malignant and tend to grow slower than exocrine tumors. They develop from the abnormal growth of endocrine cells in the pancreas and are either functional or nonfunctional, and may or may not cause signs or symptoms. Pancreatic NETs that have not spread outside the pancreas should be completely removed, if possible, because these tumors are more likely to be cured with surgery. This video shows a case of a pNET of the uncinate process, discovered in the study of a right colon cancer. Because of the small size of the pNET and its location, the association of a right laparoscopic hemicolectomy with a pancreatic tumor excision was deemed feasible. The mobilization of the mesenteric root allowed to identify the uncinate process and to prepare for the pNET excision. After the exposure of the duodenum and the retroperitoneal plane, the surgery continued with a right hemicolectomy and a complete mesocolic excision. An intracorporeal anastomosis was constructed and the surgical specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic incision. The pathological report revealed a T2N1 caecal adenocarcinoma and a G2 pNET.
Robotically assisted right colectomy with fluorescence-guided complete mesocolon excision
In robotic right hemicolectomy for cancer, appropriate lymphadenectomy and anastomotic leak prevention are critical. Visualization of draining lymph nodes, of primary tumor site and blood flow using the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence da Vinci® imaging system is a recent development.
We present the technique of robotic right colectomy with complete mesocolic excision (CME) and D3 lymphadenectomy using Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence.
The day before surgery, a colonoscopy was performed and ICG was injected around the tumor in the submucosa.
Robotic right hemicolectomy was performed with suprapubic trocars layout and bottom to up dissection, with CME, central vessel ligation, and D3 lymphadenectomy.
ICG was intraoperatively administered intravenously to assess bowel perfusion before anastomosis. The identification of the primary tumor site and of bowel stumps perfusion were possible and the accuracy in identifying the D3 lymphatic basin was high, allowing for an image-guided radical lymphadenectomy. Fluorescent technology represents a valuable innovation to improve colon cancer surgery.
W Petz, E Bertani, D Ribero, D Lo Conte, A Mellano, A Piccioli, S Borin, G Spinoglio
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
442 views
2 likes
0 comments
08:43
Robotically assisted right colectomy with fluorescence-guided complete mesocolon excision
In robotic right hemicolectomy for cancer, appropriate lymphadenectomy and anastomotic leak prevention are critical. Visualization of draining lymph nodes, of primary tumor site and blood flow using the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence da Vinci® imaging system is a recent development.
We present the technique of robotic right colectomy with complete mesocolic excision (CME) and D3 lymphadenectomy using Indocyanine Green (ICG) fluorescence.
The day before surgery, a colonoscopy was performed and ICG was injected around the tumor in the submucosa.
Robotic right hemicolectomy was performed with suprapubic trocars layout and bottom to up dissection, with CME, central vessel ligation, and D3 lymphadenectomy.
ICG was intraoperatively administered intravenously to assess bowel perfusion before anastomosis. The identification of the primary tumor site and of bowel stumps perfusion were possible and the accuracy in identifying the D3 lymphatic basin was high, allowing for an image-guided radical lymphadenectomy. Fluorescent technology represents a valuable innovation to improve colon cancer surgery.
Fully laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal tumor with “vessels first’ approach
Over the last few years, laparoscopic colorectal surgery has increased exponentially worldwide. When combined with an enhanced recovery program, a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay can be achieved, coupled with an early return to normal activities for the patient.
This is the case of a 68-year-old obese woman with a BMI of 30 presenting with a caecal tumor. Her major co-morbidities are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and high blood pressure. The patient complained of chronic abdominal pain and presented a positive fecal occult blood test. Colonoscopy showed a caecal tumor. Biopsy confirmed an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan did not show any distant metastasis. A full laparoscopic approach with a medial-to-lateral and ‘vessels first’ approach is shown.
A D'Urso, M Rodriguez, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
1404 views
6 likes
0 comments
13:27
Fully laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal tumor with “vessels first’ approach
Over the last few years, laparoscopic colorectal surgery has increased exponentially worldwide. When combined with an enhanced recovery program, a significant reduction in the length of hospital stay can be achieved, coupled with an early return to normal activities for the patient.
This is the case of a 68-year-old obese woman with a BMI of 30 presenting with a caecal tumor. Her major co-morbidities are chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and high blood pressure. The patient complained of chronic abdominal pain and presented a positive fecal occult blood test. Colonoscopy showed a caecal tumor. Biopsy confirmed an adenocarcinoma. CT-scan did not show any distant metastasis. A full laparoscopic approach with a medial-to-lateral and ‘vessels first’ approach is shown.
Skeletons in the cupboard: MY mistakes
Professor Heald teaches us the importance of learning from our mistakes and from other people so as not to commit them again, he emphasizes lessons to learn where he tells us not only about the challenges of pelvic, oncological surgery, and possible mistakes to be made. We advise you to feel free to say what we think in the surgery room, you can help in difficult situations and proper planning prior to all surgeries.
Beautiful lesson of the day: to fail to prepare is to prepare to fail.
In this outstanding didactic lecture, Professor Heald explains part of his great experience and the experiences of a career of more than 50 years, truly amazing! and life lessons he now shares with us, where he shows a clear example that “we must be our own sternest critics” and have the “courage to fail”.
in conclusion: beware of Panic Factor, and you can always call a friend, talk to patients, forget your own pride, learn to apologize.
Remember: there are things under your control and others that are not!
Thank you Professor Heald for these great teachings.
RJ Heald
Lecture
1 month ago
350 views
4 likes
0 comments
31:37
Skeletons in the cupboard: MY mistakes
Professor Heald teaches us the importance of learning from our mistakes and from other people so as not to commit them again, he emphasizes lessons to learn where he tells us not only about the challenges of pelvic, oncological surgery, and possible mistakes to be made. We advise you to feel free to say what we think in the surgery room, you can help in difficult situations and proper planning prior to all surgeries.
Beautiful lesson of the day: to fail to prepare is to prepare to fail.
In this outstanding didactic lecture, Professor Heald explains part of his great experience and the experiences of a career of more than 50 years, truly amazing! and life lessons he now shares with us, where he shows a clear example that “we must be our own sternest critics” and have the “courage to fail”.
in conclusion: beware of Panic Factor, and you can always call a friend, talk to patients, forget your own pride, learn to apologize.
Remember: there are things under your control and others that are not!
Thank you Professor Heald for these great teachings.
Transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer - Safe Transverse
In this key lecture, Dr. Armando Melani explains how transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is a doable and safe surgery, in his opinion and according to his experience.
Dr. Melani outlines the recommendations for a safe transverse colectomy and teaches us how to avoid lesions in the superior mesenteric vessels, shows laparoscopic mobilization for resection of the transverse colon due to cancer, and demonstrates an excellent vascular approach.
Finally, Dr. Melani provides the rationale of the extension of the LND for right colon cancer and gives a didactic demonstration in this video.
In conclusion, transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is relatively difficult. The reasons for this are the anatomical variations of middle colic vessels, transverse mesocolon attachments with the pancreatic head, and venous communications. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Melani demonstrates the laparoscopic approach and provides all recommendations to achieve a successful surgery.
A Melani
Lecture
1 month ago
394 views
1 like
0 comments
09:46
Transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer - Safe Transverse
In this key lecture, Dr. Armando Melani explains how transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is a doable and safe surgery, in his opinion and according to his experience.
Dr. Melani outlines the recommendations for a safe transverse colectomy and teaches us how to avoid lesions in the superior mesenteric vessels, shows laparoscopic mobilization for resection of the transverse colon due to cancer, and demonstrates an excellent vascular approach.
Finally, Dr. Melani provides the rationale of the extension of the LND for right colon cancer and gives a didactic demonstration in this video.
In conclusion, transverse colectomy with total mesocolic excision for cancer is relatively difficult. The reasons for this are the anatomical variations of middle colic vessels, transverse mesocolon attachments with the pancreatic head, and venous communications. In this authoritative lecture, Dr. Melani demonstrates the laparoscopic approach and provides all recommendations to achieve a successful surgery.
A standardized approach for complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
In this key lecture, Dr. Antonello Forgione presents a clear and precise description of the most important anatomical points as well as the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision (CME) during a right laparoscopic colectomy, in cases of cancer.
As described in the video, four ports are used, all located on the left flank. A caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon is performed along the superior mesenteric vein to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, right and middle colic vessels in their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is completely dissected and the upper right colic vein is cut and divided. The transverse colon and the terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized, and the ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible and very useful. However, it is necessary to have an extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon, as well as an experience in advanced laparoscopic techniques to obtain the expected outcomes.
Finally, Dr. Forgione provides recommendations to perform the surgery in obese patients.
A Forgione
Lecture
1 month ago
248 views
3 likes
0 comments
14:20
A standardized approach for complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
In this key lecture, Dr. Antonello Forgione presents a clear and precise description of the most important anatomical points as well as the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision (CME) during a right laparoscopic colectomy, in cases of cancer.
As described in the video, four ports are used, all located on the left flank. A caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon is performed along the superior mesenteric vein to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, right and middle colic vessels in their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is completely dissected and the upper right colic vein is cut and divided. The transverse colon and the terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized, and the ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible and very useful. However, it is necessary to have an extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon, as well as an experience in advanced laparoscopic techniques to obtain the expected outcomes.
Finally, Dr. Forgione provides recommendations to perform the surgery in obese patients.
Vascular anatomy of left and right colon: standard vs. variations
The vascular anatomy of the colon has some anatomical variations [1]. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the colon, authors show many vascular anomalies of surgical interest, which should be known in order to avoid intraoperative complications. In the right colon, the ileocolic artery and the middle colic artery are constantly present in all patients as they arise from the superior mesenteric vessels [2]. Right colic vessels are present only in 80% of cases. The position of ileocolic vessels related to the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) is a key landmark. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the right colon, authors show variant ileocolic vessels position defined type A pattern, with ileocolic artery (ICA) which lies in the anterior position in respect to the ileocolic vein (ICV). Authors also show an anomalous origin of the ileocolic vessels, which are more upper in respect to their standard position. Commonly, the ileocolic artery (ICA) lies posterior to the SMV (83%, type B). However, the ICA sometimes lies anteriorly to the SMV (17%, type A) [1]. The vascular system of the left colon has fewer variations in terms of position and origin, contrarily to the right colon. The most frequent variations of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) supply involve the division of the sigmoid arteries, as classified by Latarjet in two different types, depending on the anatomical relationship between the left colic and sigmoid arteries [3]. However, in this video authors show a rare case of IMA arising from the superior mesenteric artery [4].
References:
1. Milsom JW, Böhm B, Nakajima K. Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery 2006, Springer.
2. Wu C, Ye K, Wu Y, Chen Q, Xu J, Lin J, Kang W. Variations in right colic vascular anatomy observed during laparoscopic right colectomy. World J Surg Oncol 2019;17:16.
3. Patroni A, Bonnet S, Bourillon C, Bruzzi M, Zinzindohoue F, Chevallier JM, Douard R, Berger A. Technical difficulties of left colic artery preservation during left colectomy for colon cancer. Surg Radiol Anat 2016;38:477-84.
4. Yoo SJ, Ku MJ, Cho SS, Yoon SP. A case of the inferior mesenteric artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery in a Korean woman. J Korean Med Sci 2011;26:1382-5.
F Corcione, E Pontecorvi, V Silvestri, G Merola, U Bracale
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
1705 views
19 likes
0 comments
21:44
Vascular anatomy of left and right colon: standard vs. variations
The vascular anatomy of the colon has some anatomical variations [1]. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the colon, authors show many vascular anomalies of surgical interest, which should be known in order to avoid intraoperative complications. In the right colon, the ileocolic artery and the middle colic artery are constantly present in all patients as they arise from the superior mesenteric vessels [2]. Right colic vessels are present only in 80% of cases. The position of ileocolic vessels related to the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) is a key landmark. In this video, starting from the normal surgical anatomy of the right colon, authors show variant ileocolic vessels position defined type A pattern, with ileocolic artery (ICA) which lies in the anterior position in respect to the ileocolic vein (ICV). Authors also show an anomalous origin of the ileocolic vessels, which are more upper in respect to their standard position. Commonly, the ileocolic artery (ICA) lies posterior to the SMV (83%, type B). However, the ICA sometimes lies anteriorly to the SMV (17%, type A) [1]. The vascular system of the left colon has fewer variations in terms of position and origin, contrarily to the right colon. The most frequent variations of the inferior mesenteric artery (IMA) supply involve the division of the sigmoid arteries, as classified by Latarjet in two different types, depending on the anatomical relationship between the left colic and sigmoid arteries [3]. However, in this video authors show a rare case of IMA arising from the superior mesenteric artery [4].
References:
1. Milsom JW, Böhm B, Nakajima K. Laparoscopic Colorectal Surgery 2006, Springer.
2. Wu C, Ye K, Wu Y, Chen Q, Xu J, Lin J, Kang W. Variations in right colic vascular anatomy observed during laparoscopic right colectomy. World J Surg Oncol 2019;17:16.
3. Patroni A, Bonnet S, Bourillon C, Bruzzi M, Zinzindohoue F, Chevallier JM, Douard R, Berger A. Technical difficulties of left colic artery preservation during left colectomy for colon cancer. Surg Radiol Anat 2016;38:477-84.
4. Yoo SJ, Ku MJ, Cho SS, Yoon SP. A case of the inferior mesenteric artery arising from the superior mesenteric artery in a Korean woman. J Korean Med Sci 2011;26:1382-5.
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
F Corcione, M D'Ambra, U Bracale, S Dilillo, G Luglio
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
2914 views
3 likes
1 comment
23:20
Redo laparoscopic anterior resection
The reported incidence rates of regional recurrence for colorectal cancer after oncologic resection ranged between 5% and 19%. Locoregional recurrence occurs in the anastomotic site, the remnant colon, the peritoneal surface (nodal or soft tissue), or the retroperitoneum. As reported in the literature, in colorectal cancers, mucinous differentiation, lymphovascular invasion and anastomotic leakage are independent risk factors for anastomotic recurrence.
We present the case of an 86 year-old female patient. In 2014, the patient underwent a laparoscopic left colectomy for a Haggitt level 4 sigmoid polyp. The definitive histologic features showed a T2N0M0 mucinous adenocarcinoma. During the postoperative follow-up, 46 months after the left colectomy, an anastomotic recurrence was found. The patient underwent a laparoscopic colorectal resection for anastomotic recurrence. The operative time was 220 minutes. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 6. No complications occurred intraoperatively and postoperatively.
References:
1. Gopalan S, Bose JC, Periasamy S (2015) Anastomotic Recurrence of Colon Cancer-is it a Local Recurrence, a Second Primary, or a Metastatic Disease (Local Manifestation of Systemic Disease)? Indian J Surg 77:232-236.
2. Ramphal W, Boeding JRE, Gobardhan PD, Rutten HJT, de Winter L, Crolla R, Schreinemakers JMJ (2018) Oncologic outcome and recurrence rate following anastomotic leakage after curative resection for colorectal cancer. Surg Oncol 27:730-736.
3. Jung WB, Yu CS, Lim SB, Park IJ, Yoon YS, Kim JC (2017) Anastomotic Recurrence After Curative Resection for Colorectal Cancer. World J Surg 41:285-294.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
S Macina, L Baldari, E Cassinotti, M Ballabio, A Spota, M de Francesco, L Boni
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
4606 views
22 likes
1 comment
07:10
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) for right colon cancer
The aim of the video is to describe the anatomical landmarks and the surgical technique for complete mesocolic excision during a laparoscopic right colectomy for cancer.
Preoperative high-resolution CT-scan and 3D printed models of the patient’s vascular anatomy is obtained to study the peculiar vessels distribution. Four ports are used, all located in the left flank as described in the video. Dissection between the visceral fascia which covers the posterior layer of the mesocolon and the parietal fascia covering the retroperitoneum (Toldt’s fascia) is carried out by means of monopolar electrocautery and combined advanced bipolar and ultrasonic dissection device. Caudocranial dissection of the mesocolon along the route of the superior mesenteric vein is performed, up to the inferior margin of the pancreas, exposing, ligating and dividing the ileocolic, the right and middle colic vessels at their origins. The gastrocolic trunk is fully dissected and the superior right colic vein clipped and divided. The transverse colon and terminal ileum are divided, the colon is mobilized and ileo-transverse intracorporeal stapled anastomosis is fashioned.
Between April 2017 and December 2018, 46 laparoscopic right hemicolectomies with CME were performed. There were no major vascular lesions. All intraoperative bleedings in the peripancreatic area were controlled with bipolar instruments and hemostatic devices, and there was no need for intraoperative blood cell transfusions.
Laparoscopic CME is feasible, but extensive knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the right colon as well as experience in advanced laparoscopic technique is required.
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
E Soricelli, E Facchiano, L Leuratti, G Quartararo, N Console, P Tonelli, M Lucchese
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
3668 views
13 likes
0 comments
09:10
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer with prophylactic lighted ureteral stenting (LUS)
Identifying the ureter during colorectal surgery (CRS) is one of the most critical steps of the operation. Iatrogenic ureteral injury occurs very rarely, with an incidence ranging from 0.28 to 7.6%. However, this complication has the potential to be devastating and its prevention is a priority. Laparoscopic approach in CRS reduces the tactile feedback of the surgeon who has to rely only on visual identification to prevent iatrogenic injury. As a result, lighted ureteral stents (LUS) were devised to improve visual identification of ureters throughout the dissection.
This video presents the case of a 70-year-old woman presenting with a caecal adenocarcinoma. She underwent a laparoscopic right colectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis. A LUS (IRIS U-kit®, Stryker) was placed under general anesthesia, just before the beginning of the surgical procedure, requiring about 15 minutes to be accomplished. The stent was removed after the operation, before the end of anesthesia, with no postoperative sequelas.
In order to prevent any potential iatrogenic injury, the selective or routine use of LUS during laparoscopic CRS could well improve the identification of the ureter, with a negligible increase in the operative time.
Endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection for malignant polyp excision
This is the case of an 83-year-old woman who presented with per rectal bleeding. She had flexible sigmoidoscopy, which showed a 1.5 to 2cm flat polyp with central depression and non-lifting sign. CT-scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was performed and showed no metastasis. The case was discussed with the multidisciplinary team and decision was made to perform an endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection. The case was performed using the colonic FTRD® set (OVESCO™). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. During the postoperative follow-up, the resection margin was clear. This is the first case performed in the North-East of England to our knowledge. Since this case, we have performed another case.
Y Aawsaj, K Khan, M Hayat
Surgical intervention
8 months ago
788 views
2 likes
1 comment
05:30
Endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection for malignant polyp excision
This is the case of an 83-year-old woman who presented with per rectal bleeding. She had flexible sigmoidoscopy, which showed a 1.5 to 2cm flat polyp with central depression and non-lifting sign. CT-scan of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis was performed and showed no metastasis. The case was discussed with the multidisciplinary team and decision was made to perform an endoscopic full-thickness colonic resection. The case was performed using the colonic FTRD® set (OVESCO™). The procedure was completed successfully and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. During the postoperative follow-up, the resection margin was clear. This is the first case performed in the North-East of England to our knowledge. Since this case, we have performed another case.
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
J Magalhães, L Matos, J Costa, J Costa Pereira, G Gonçalves, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3248 views
14 likes
4 comments
10:31
Laparoscopic right colectomy: bottom-to-up approach with intracorporeal anastomosis
Introduction
Laparoscopic right colectomy (LRC) has become a well-established technique in colon cancer treatment achieving the same degree of radicality as open colectomy with the advantages of minimal invasion. A medial-to-lateral approach is the standard technique, but the bottom-to-up approach, with intracorporeal anastomosis (BTU), has recently gained popularity among surgeons.
Clinical case
The authors report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with persistent abdominal discomfort and a change in bowel habits. Preoperative staging revealed an adenocarcinoma at the hepatic flexure of the colon with no metastatic disease. The patient was proposed for a laparoscopic right colectomy.
A bottom-to-up approach was performed by opening an avascular plane posterior to the right mesocolon, creating a mesenteric route cranially along Gerota’s fascia until the duodenum and liver have been exposed. A side-to-side ileocolic intracorporeal stapled anastomosis was fashioned. The procedure and postoperative recovery were uneventful.
Discussion/Conclusion
LRC using a BTU approach is a feasible and safe alternative to the conventional medial-to-lateral approach. The main advantages are a short learning curve and an easy access to the retroperitoneal space with direct visualization and protection of retroperitoneal structures. The performance of an intracorporeal anastomosis offers the advantage of a smaller extraction incision, lower wound-related complications, and fast recovery.
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
G Basili, D Pietrasanta, N Romano, AF Costa
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2842 views
9 likes
0 comments
10:12
Totally laparoscopic splenic flexure resection for cancer
The objective of this video is to demonstrate a laparoscopic segmental oncological splenic flexure colonic resection for cancer. Splenic flexure carcinoma is a rare condition, as it represents 3 to 8% of all colon cancers. It is associated with a high risk of obstruction and a poor prognosis. The surgical approach is challenging and not fully standardized. The resected area must include the mesocolon with major vessels ligation at their origin, in order to reduce local recurrence via the complete removal of potentially involved lymph node stations.
The oncological effectiveness of a segmental resection could be determined by the peculiar lymphatic spread of splenic flexure cancers. Different studies showed that the majority of positive lymph nodes among patients with splenic flexure carcinoma are distributed along the paracolic arcade and the left colic artery. As a result, a segmental resection associated with a medial-to-lateral approach could be safe and effective. The experience with a totally laparoscopic approach with intracorporeal anastomosis is well described in the current literature. Additionally, an intracorporeal anastomosis minimizes the risk of bowel twisting, preventing the exteriorization of the stumps, and reducing bowel traction, which can affect anastomotic irrigation, especially in obese patients. In a setting of surgeons experienced with laparoscopic colorectal surgery, the outcomes of laparoscopic segmental resection of splenic flexure are similar to those of laparoscopic resections for cancer in other locations.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
S Morales-Conde, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6050 views
12 likes
0 comments
43:25
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: fully comprehensive demonstration of laparoscopic left hemicolectomy for synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and rectosigmoid junction in an obese patient
In this live interactive surgery, Dr. Salvador Morales-Conde presents a case of synchronous sigmoid and rectosigmoid adenocarcinoma in an obese patient (BMI of 30). During mucosectomy of a sigmoid polyp at 20cm from the anal verge, a pTis adenocarcinoma was diagnosed when completely resected. A pT1 adenocarcinoma was biopsied at the rectosigmoid junction (12-15cm from the anal verge). Staging revealed no distant metastases. The operative technique shown consists in an oncological resection with mobilization of the splenic flexure.
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2094 views
5 likes
0 comments
15:36
Robotic triple docking ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and coloanal anastomosis
The da Vinci™ surgical robotic system with its increased instrument stability, magnified tridimensional view, and dexterity with 7 degrees of wristed motion of its instruments offers a distinct surgical advantage over traditional laparoscopic instruments. This is especially true in the deep pelvis, where the limited space and visibility make it extremely challenging to perform distal rectal dissection. Additionally, the complete control of the surgeon over the stable surgical platform allows fine and accurate dissection in this area.
For very low rectal tumors close to the anorectal junction, if a sphincter-saving procedure is to be attempted, surgeons will frequently perform an intersphincteric resection (ISR) with a handsewn coloanal anastomosis. If successful, the patient will be able to avoid an abdominoperineal resection and its resulting permanent stoma.
ISR is a technically challenging procedure to perform, especially in male and obese patients. It is because the approach to the intersphincteric plane from the abdominal approach is deep within the pelvis and frequently curves anteriorly, which makes the intersphincteric plane challenging to approach laparoscopically. In addition, ISR from the perineum is also difficult as the anus has a small opening; as a result, when the surgeon sits directly in front of the perineum, assistants will be unable to adequately visualize the operating field, making it very challenging to properly assist for the dissection. It may potentially result in some blind dissection, which may lead to entry into the wrong plane and a poor oncological specimen.
With the da Vinci™ surgical robotic system, this problem can potentially be minimized. First, via the transabdominal approach, the robotic system is able to access deep into the pelvic cavity and dissect down to the intersphincteric plane beyond the puborectalis sling. Secondly, docking the robot and approaching the ISR perineally, the robotic system can also provide a magnified vision, a fine dissection and allow the assistant a good viewing position sitting in front of the perineum to assist in a more productive manner. These advantages of the robotic system will facilitate ISR dissection and retrieval of a superior oncological specimen.
This video features a totally robotic triple docking approach for an ultralow anterior resection with intersphincteric resection and handsewn coloanal anastomosis in a male patient with a low rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
S Rua
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4202 views
14 likes
0 comments
13:14
Laparoscopic left hemicolectomy in a thin patient, including anastomotic control using intraoperative fluorescence
Usually, Body Mass Index (BMI) is correlated to the difficulty in performing the surgery. Obesity is associated with a more complex surgery and a longer operative time due to difficulties in finding the right plane of dissection and identifying the structures. However, treating a thin patient may also be dangerous because the planes of dissection are more adherent, which makes it harder to identify the real embryological dissection plane.
This video shows the danger of dissection when the mesocolon is very thin and adherent to Toldt’s fascia or Gerota’s fascia.

The nightmare of colon and rectum surgery is the leak of the anastomosis. It may occur also with all precaution: no anastomotic tension, the evaluation of the vascularization may be difficult because macroscopic lesion, when there is an ischemia, would appear after some hours; the use of the ICG test is a good tool to control the poor vascularization of the anastomosis earlier and to correct it, hence avoiding the drama of the leak.
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
SAE Yeo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
15875 views
1094 likes
0 comments
13:33
Laparoscopic complete mesocolic excision (CME) right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Complete mesocolic excision (CME) in colon cancer surgery has recently gained popularity as increasing evidence points to improved oncological clearance with superior lymph node yield, bigger tumor clearance margins, and higher quality surgical specimens. There are also some indications that it may lead to improved oncological outcomes. The tenets of CME include high vascular ligation at the root of the vessel, dissection along the embryological planes of the colonic mesentery, and adequate margins of bowel from the tumor.
Although the technique was initially described and achieved via a laparotomy, laparoscopic CME was also performed, although it was noted to be technically challenging. The right colon and the variability of vascular anatomy add to the difficulty of the procedure.
Extracorporeal anastomosis is commonly performed for right hemicolectomy in most centers. There are some reported advantages to the intracorporeal anastomosis, namely a potentially higher lymph node yield, a smaller skin incision, and the ability to extract the specimen via a Pfannenstiel’s incision, which has lower rates of incisional hernia.
This video features a laparoscopic CME right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis for a malignant polyp.
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
Note from the WeBSurg-IRCAD Scientific Committee:
This video entitled “Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach" shows an original technique of segmental colonic resection for benign conditions. Although, in the present case, the indication is not specified, there seems to be a tattooing on a lesion, which would not correspond to the initial indication of benign conditions. The indication might be a polyp. Such indications remain rare. The given approach is difficult to perform for inflammatory pathologies generating significant adhesions. However, although the video quality is not ideal, it was decided to publish this film with a special mention “case for debate” stating that this is not the IRCAD position, but the technique can be discussed.
Note from the authors of the video:
We have designed a modified caudal-to-cranial approach to perform a laparoscopic left colectomy preserving the inferior mesenteric artery for benign colorectal diseases.
A dissection is performed to separate the descending mesocolon from the plane of Gerota's fascia from the medial aspect to the peritoneal lining to the left parietal gutter. The peritoneal layer is incised parallel to the vessel and close to the colonic wall. The dissection is continued anteriorly up to reach the resected parietal gutter. A passage into the mesentery of the upper rectum is created for the use of the stapler and the dissection of the rectum. These maneuvers allow to straighten the mesentery simplifying the identification and division of the sigmoid arteries. A caudal-to-cranial dissection of the mesentery is performed from the divided rectum to the proximal descending colon using a sealed envelope device. It can be very useful to mobilize the colon in any direction: laterally, medially, or upward. The dissection is performed along the course of the vessel up to the proximal colon, with progressive division of the sigmoid arterial branches. The specimen is extracted through a Pfannenstiel incision. The anastomosis is performed transanally with a circular stapler according to the Knight-Griffen technique.
M Milone, P Anoldo, M Manigrasso, F Milone
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4289 views
505 likes
0 comments
09:27
Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach
Note from the WeBSurg-IRCAD Scientific Committee:
This video entitled “Segmental left colectomy: a modified caudal-to-cranial approach" shows an original technique of segmental colonic resection for benign conditions. Although, in the present case, the indication is not specified, there seems to be a tattooing on a lesion, which would not correspond to the initial indication of benign conditions. The indication might be a polyp. Such indications remain rare. The given approach is difficult to perform for inflammatory pathologies generating significant adhesions. However, although the video quality is not ideal, it was decided to publish this film with a special mention “case for debate” stating that this is not the IRCAD position, but the technique can be discussed.
Note from the authors of the video:
We have designed a modified caudal-to-cranial approach to perform a laparoscopic left colectomy preserving the inferior mesenteric artery for benign colorectal diseases.
A dissection is performed to separate the descending mesocolon from the plane of Gerota's fascia from the medial aspect to the peritoneal lining to the left parietal gutter. The peritoneal layer is incised parallel to the vessel and close to the colonic wall. The dissection is continued anteriorly up to reach the resected parietal gutter. A passage into the mesentery of the upper rectum is created for the use of the stapler and the dissection of the rectum. These maneuvers allow to straighten the mesentery simplifying the identification and division of the sigmoid arteries. A caudal-to-cranial dissection of the mesentery is performed from the divided rectum to the proximal descending colon using a sealed envelope device. It can be very useful to mobilize the colon in any direction: laterally, medially, or upward. The dissection is performed along the course of the vessel up to the proximal colon, with progressive division of the sigmoid arterial branches. The specimen is extracted through a Pfannenstiel incision. The anastomosis is performed transanally with a circular stapler according to the Knight-Griffen technique.