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Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
H Grover, R Syed, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
10 months ago
11813 views
108 likes
25 comments
07:04
Various approaches to uterine artery ligation at laparoscopy
Isolating the uterine artery can be performed safely and efficiently with a proper knowledge of the anatomy, as pelvic vascular anatomy is relatively constant with a very predictive retroperitoneal course. In this video, authors review the anatomy relevant to the uterine artery and demonstrate various approaches to ligating it laparoscopically. It is essential as it provides hemostasis and reduces the incidence of potential injury to bladder and ureter, particularly in cases where anatomical relationships have been distorted by intra-abdominal adhesions as in cases of previous surgery, severe endometriosis or large fibroids or when access to the cervix is limited due to wide uteri or to a fibrogenic cul-de-sac or when access to the vesicouterine space is obliterated due to previous surgeries. The various approaches to ligating the uterine artery in relation to the broad ligament are lateral, posterior, anterior, and medial. These approaches can be used based on the patient’s pathology and requirements.
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
This video shows a reproducible approach to complete parametrectomy in a patient who had had a hysterectomy. The procedure begins with adhesiolysis and dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the parametrium. The paravesical fossa is then dissected medially and laterally using the umbilical artery as a landmark. The surgeon identifies the uterine artery and parametrium by following the umbilical artery. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the parametrium, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the pararectal spaces in order to isolate the posterior part of the parametrium. The ureter is dissected towards the ureteral channel and unroofed. The procedure is carried on with the complete isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the parametrium and the bladder. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum, paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The parametrium is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel. The vagina is cut with ultrasonic scissors using a cap of RUMI II as a guide, and the specimen is extracted vaginally. The surgeon performs a bilateral lymphadenectomy. In this step, the obturator nerve is dissected to prevent injuries at the medial aspect of the obturator artery. The vagina is closed with continued stitches vaginally using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
H Camuzcuoglu, B Sezgin
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
6149 views
456 likes
1 comment
11:55
Laparoscopic complete parametrectomy associated with upper vaginectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy
This video shows a reproducible approach to complete parametrectomy in a patient who had had a hysterectomy. The procedure begins with adhesiolysis and dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the parametrium. The paravesical fossa is then dissected medially and laterally using the umbilical artery as a landmark. The surgeon identifies the uterine artery and parametrium by following the umbilical artery. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the parametrium, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the pararectal spaces in order to isolate the posterior part of the parametrium. The ureter is dissected towards the ureteral channel and unroofed. The procedure is carried on with the complete isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the parametrium and the bladder. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum, paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The parametrium is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel. The vagina is cut with ultrasonic scissors using a cap of RUMI II as a guide, and the specimen is extracted vaginally. The surgeon performs a bilateral lymphadenectomy. In this step, the obturator nerve is dissected to prevent injuries at the medial aspect of the obturator artery. The vagina is closed with continued stitches vaginally using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3947 views
391 likes
0 comments
06:01
Use of visual cues in hysteroscopic management of Asherman's syndrome
The normal uterine cavity is distorted or obliterated due to severe adhesions in Asherman’s syndrome, which makes surgery difficult to perform. The high-definition vision of the camera can help to identify visual cues and clues during hysteroscopy, which can guide the surgery.
The objective of this video is to demonstrate that the information gathered from various visual cues during hysteroscopy is really helpful to the surgeon.
The video focuses on the use of the following seven visual cues: color of fibrous bands and endometrium which imparts a white spectrum; thread-like texture of fibrotic bands; lacunae and their dilatation in scar tissue; probing and post-probing analysis using scissors (5 French); color and appearance of myometrial fibers which impart a pink spectrum; vascularity differentiation; matching analysis with a normal uterine cavity.
Various techniques described for the management of this condition include fluorescence-guided, ultrasonography-guided, and hysteroscopic adhesiolysis under laparoscopic control, which are expensive procedures. We suggest that the high-definition vision and visual cues during hysteroscopy should be initially used intraoperatively for guidance purposes before using such options. It may be sufficient to achieve the desired result in most cases.
Hysteroscopic treatment of a symptomatic isthmocele in a bicorporeal uterus
Clinical case: We report the case of a primigravida 36-year-old woman, with a unicervical bicorporeal uterus type. An isthmocele was diagnosed within a context of postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding and secondary infertility arising after C-section. The hydrosonography evidenced a moderate scar defect, the myometrium next to the "niche" measuring 3mm. Because of the symptomatology and the failure of multiple embryo transfer procedures, an operative hysteroscopy was performed. The patient was able to become pregnant spontaneously and give birth to a healthy child via C-section.

Conclusion: A minimally invasive procedure using a hysteroscopic resection of the fibrotic scar tissue is to be considered first, given the existence of an isthmocele in a symptomatic and/or infertile woman, even in the case of a uterine malformation. It is an effective and safe treatment option. However, it has to be considered only if the residual myometrium measures more than 3mm next to the defect.

Key words:
Hysteroscopic resection, isthmocele, cesarean section, bicorporeal uterus.
J Dubuisson, S Wegener, I Streuli
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5672 views
315 likes
0 comments
05:12
Hysteroscopic treatment of a symptomatic isthmocele in a bicorporeal uterus
Clinical case: We report the case of a primigravida 36-year-old woman, with a unicervical bicorporeal uterus type. An isthmocele was diagnosed within a context of postmenstrual abnormal uterine bleeding and secondary infertility arising after C-section. The hydrosonography evidenced a moderate scar defect, the myometrium next to the "niche" measuring 3mm. Because of the symptomatology and the failure of multiple embryo transfer procedures, an operative hysteroscopy was performed. The patient was able to become pregnant spontaneously and give birth to a healthy child via C-section.

Conclusion: A minimally invasive procedure using a hysteroscopic resection of the fibrotic scar tissue is to be considered first, given the existence of an isthmocele in a symptomatic and/or infertile woman, even in the case of a uterine malformation. It is an effective and safe treatment option. However, it has to be considered only if the residual myometrium measures more than 3mm next to the defect.

Key words:
Hysteroscopic resection, isthmocele, cesarean section, bicorporeal uterus.
Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses for cervical agenesis
Cervical agenesis occurs in one in 80,000 to 100,000 births. According to the American Fertility Society, cervical agenesis should be classified as a type 1b Müllerian anomaly. According to the ESHRE/ESGE classification, it is classified in class C4 category.
This is the case of a 16 year-old female patient with primary amenorrhea and episodes of cyclical lower abdominal pain for one year. After complete examination and investigations, diagnosis of isolated cervical agenesis with hematometra and left ovarian chocolate cyst was established. Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses were performed using an innovative technique and an appropriate management of endometriosis. A hysteroscopy was later performed and showed anastomotic patency. As a result, the patient has been experiencing spontaneous regular menstruation for nine months.
Suy Naval, R Naval, Sud Naval, A Padmawar
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2096 views
182 likes
1 comment
07:49
Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses for cervical agenesis
Cervical agenesis occurs in one in 80,000 to 100,000 births. According to the American Fertility Society, cervical agenesis should be classified as a type 1b Müllerian anomaly. According to the ESHRE/ESGE classification, it is classified in class C4 category.
This is the case of a 16 year-old female patient with primary amenorrhea and episodes of cyclical lower abdominal pain for one year. After complete examination and investigations, diagnosis of isolated cervical agenesis with hematometra and left ovarian chocolate cyst was established. Laparoscopic uterovaginal anastomoses were performed using an innovative technique and an appropriate management of endometriosis. A hysteroscopy was later performed and showed anastomotic patency. As a result, the patient has been experiencing spontaneous regular menstruation for nine months.
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers (update of April 2012 lecture)
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. In the majority of patients, the disease will present at an early stage, without metastasis, and with an excellent prognosis.
Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without a lymph node dissection is the standard method in the management of endometrial cancer. Although the rate of metastasis in patients with early stage endometrial cancer is low, the standard of treatment still includes a complete or selective pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy for staging, resulting in detrimental side-effects, including lower extremity lymphedema. SLN mapping is based on the concept that lymph node metastasis is the result of an orderly process, that is, the lymph drains in a specific pattern away from the tumor, and therefore if the SLN, or first node, is negative for metastasis, then the nodes after the SLN should also be negative. Among gynecological cancers, a variety of methods have been described to detect a sentinel node in situ including colored dyes and radioisotopes, the latter requiring a specialized gamma detection probe. In this key presentation, Dr. Querleu will talk about the SNL technique in uterine cancers.
D Querleu
Lecture
3 years ago
1608 views
134 likes
0 comments
34:36
Sentinel node technique in uterine cancers (update of April 2012 lecture)
Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy. In the majority of patients, the disease will present at an early stage, without metastasis, and with an excellent prognosis.
Total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy with or without a lymph node dissection is the standard method in the management of endometrial cancer. Although the rate of metastasis in patients with early stage endometrial cancer is low, the standard of treatment still includes a complete or selective pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy for staging, resulting in detrimental side-effects, including lower extremity lymphedema. SLN mapping is based on the concept that lymph node metastasis is the result of an orderly process, that is, the lymph drains in a specific pattern away from the tumor, and therefore if the SLN, or first node, is negative for metastasis, then the nodes after the SLN should also be negative. Among gynecological cancers, a variety of methods have been described to detect a sentinel node in situ including colored dyes and radioisotopes, the latter requiring a specialized gamma detection probe. In this key presentation, Dr. Querleu will talk about the SNL technique in uterine cancers.
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
F Kridelka
Lecture
3 years ago
1533 views
124 likes
0 comments
27:54
Role of para-aortic staging lymphadenectomy in advanced cervical cancer (update of September 2014 lecture)
Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node evaluation is a major component of the surgical staging procedure for several gynecologic malignancies. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, but assessment of pelvic and para-aortic lymph nodes is performed with lymphadenectomy and/or imaging. The surgical and oncologic goals of lymph node dissection are to define the extent of disease, and thereby, to guide further treatment. Lymphadenectomy may also have a therapeutic goal in conditions in which removing nodes harboring metastatic disease improves survival. The role of para-aortic lymph node dissection for women diagnosed with LACC had been described in these slides.
Laparoscopic management of extrauterine leiomyomas
Uterine leiomyomas affect 20 to 30% of women older than 35 years. Extrauterine leiomyomas are rarer, and they present a greater diagnostic challenge. These histologically benign leiomyomas occasionally occur with unusual growth patterns or in unusual locations which make their identification more challenging both clinically and radiologically. Unusual growth patterns may be seen, including benign metastasizing leiomyoma, disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis, intravenous leiomyomatosis, parasitic leiomyoma, and retroperitoneal growth. Diffuse peritoneal leiomyomatosis manifests as innumerable peritoneal nodules resembling those in peritoneal carcinomatosis. Parasitic leiomyoma and retroperitoneal leiomyomatosis usually manifest as single or multiple pelvic or retroperitoneal masses. Retroperitoneal growth is yet another unusual growth pattern of leiomyomas. Multiple leiomyomatous masses are usually seen in the pelvic retroperitoneum in women with a concurrent uterine leiomyoma or a history of uterine leiomyoma. Rarely, the extrauterine masses may extend to the upper retroperitoneum, as high as the level of the renal hilum. Occasionally, leiomyomas become adherent to surrounding structures (e.g., broad ligament, omentum, or retroperitoneal connective tissue), develop an auxiliary blood supply, and lose their original attachment to the uterus, hence becoming “parasitic.” We are presenting a case of extrauterine leiomyoma, which was operated for laparoscopic myomectomy for huge cervical leiomyoma 4 years back but was converted to an abdominal myomectomy.
D Limbachiya
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3057 views
174 likes
0 comments
09:11
Laparoscopic management of extrauterine leiomyomas
Uterine leiomyomas affect 20 to 30% of women older than 35 years. Extrauterine leiomyomas are rarer, and they present a greater diagnostic challenge. These histologically benign leiomyomas occasionally occur with unusual growth patterns or in unusual locations which make their identification more challenging both clinically and radiologically. Unusual growth patterns may be seen, including benign metastasizing leiomyoma, disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis, intravenous leiomyomatosis, parasitic leiomyoma, and retroperitoneal growth. Diffuse peritoneal leiomyomatosis manifests as innumerable peritoneal nodules resembling those in peritoneal carcinomatosis. Parasitic leiomyoma and retroperitoneal leiomyomatosis usually manifest as single or multiple pelvic or retroperitoneal masses. Retroperitoneal growth is yet another unusual growth pattern of leiomyomas. Multiple leiomyomatous masses are usually seen in the pelvic retroperitoneum in women with a concurrent uterine leiomyoma or a history of uterine leiomyoma. Rarely, the extrauterine masses may extend to the upper retroperitoneum, as high as the level of the renal hilum. Occasionally, leiomyomas become adherent to surrounding structures (e.g., broad ligament, omentum, or retroperitoneal connective tissue), develop an auxiliary blood supply, and lose their original attachment to the uterus, hence becoming “parasitic.” We are presenting a case of extrauterine leiomyoma, which was operated for laparoscopic myomectomy for huge cervical leiomyoma 4 years back but was converted to an abdominal myomectomy.
In bag morcellation of a uterine fibroid
For a long time, morcellation of an undiagnosed malignancy, an old and frightening topic, has been a matter of extensive discussions. Clinicians and pathologists still lack instruments to clearly diagnose specific pathologies such as leiomyosarcomas. Minimally invasive surgery brought numerous advantages for the patient. However, morcellation is a key issue for the extraction of a large uterus and myomas. In this video, we present an option for the extraction of myomas. By insufflating a large Endobag®, a virtual abdominal cavity is created, and the mass is morcellated under direct vision. The resistant bag works not only as a protection for the abdominal cavity in case of an undiagnosed malignancy, but also serves to deviate organs from the morcellator.
R Fernandes, A Silva e Silva, JP Carvalho
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3489 views
132 likes
0 comments
06:37
In bag morcellation of a uterine fibroid
For a long time, morcellation of an undiagnosed malignancy, an old and frightening topic, has been a matter of extensive discussions. Clinicians and pathologists still lack instruments to clearly diagnose specific pathologies such as leiomyosarcomas. Minimally invasive surgery brought numerous advantages for the patient. However, morcellation is a key issue for the extraction of a large uterus and myomas. In this video, we present an option for the extraction of myomas. By insufflating a large Endobag®, a virtual abdominal cavity is created, and the mass is morcellated under direct vision. The resistant bag works not only as a protection for the abdominal cavity in case of an undiagnosed malignancy, but also serves to deviate organs from the morcellator.
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.
A Wattiez, F Asencio, J Faria, I Argay, L Schwartz
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
9476 views
313 likes
0 comments
25:01
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.