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Contributions

Share your knowledge and know-how with the largest online community of surgeons!

You can contribute to WebSurg by submitting your minimally invasive surgery videos that will help us increase the scope of our educational content. This is a unique opportunity for you to share your surgical skills with the largest community of surgeons worldwide, and become part of our international Faculty.

You want to submit the video of your surgical procedure? Before doing so make sure it is in HD, and that it is fully edited.

Upload your video

You must be logged in to upload video. Click here to access your account, or here to register for free!

Validation process

Videos submitted to us are sent to a peer-review committee who will decide if the video can be published on WebSurg. This decision depends on the technical quality of the video and on its scientific relevance and compliance with international guidelines, but also on its originality. We remain at your disposal throughout this process to inform you on the status of your video publication.

Should your video not be validated by our editorial team, we will give you the reasons for this. However you are still more than welcome to send us more videos.

Get more info

Typical structure for a contribution

A contribution must comply with several criteria in order to be validated by our scientific committee. Here is an example of the various steps when a contribution is submitted to WebSurg.

01.

Title

10s
02.

List of authors

10s

Author names and their titles (MD, PhD, etc.).

03.

Clinical case

15-20s

Patient age and gender, clinical and medical history, surgical indications, etc. Views of CT-scans, MRI or other diagnostic tools. Find a template on this page.

04.

Patient

15-20s

Patient, trocar, and operating staff position.

05.

Film

~15 minutes

English video written narrative with a full description of the surgical procedure and of the postoperative outcomes.

06.

Credits

5-10s

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The latest contributions

Surgical intervention
09:56
Winslow's hiatal hernia: laparoscopic treatment
Less than 200 cases of internal hernia have been described through the hiatus of Winslow, usually related to congenital or acquired anatomical defects. The most frequent affectation corresponds to the colon, small intestine and, rarely, to the gallbladder. There is usually occlusion with variable grade ischemia, but it can also occur as obstructive jaundice, biliary colic, secondary pancreatitis and non-symptomatic herniation.
The association of Winslow’s hiatus hernia with various anatomical abnormalities (high or subhepatic caecum, mobile ascending colon, large and long colonic mesentery, etc.) may actually correspond to different degrees of intestinal malrotation and, although the diagnosis of “malrotation” is not usually specified, we believe that this could underlie part of Winslow’s hiatus hernia associated with non-acquired anatomical defects.
Hiatal hernia corresponds to 0.2-0.9% of all cases of intestinal obstruction, of which 8% are from Winslow’s hiatus. If pre-surgical diagnosis is difficult, it occurs in less than 10% of cases.
Mortality is around 50% when it has vascular implication. We have not thought of applying the omentum to seal the defect because we did not have adequate surgical anchor sites since we were working millimeters from the vena cava, extrahepatic bile duct, duodenum, and perirenal area. We decided to fix the colon from the hepatic flexure to the right iliac fossa with continuous stitches, from the colonic serosa to Toldt’s fascia, as it is from the embryonic stage.
Winslow's hiatal hernia: laparoscopic treatment
JL Limon Aguilar, CO Castillo Cabrera
52 views
1 day ago
Surgical intervention
11:43
Proximal gastrectomy with stapled circular esophagogastrostomy: manual purse-string technique
Early tumors of the esophagogastric junction can be managed with a minimally invasive proximal gastrectomy. This operation has recently been reevaluated for early-stage tumors since it offers a good postoperative quality of life with oncological outcomes equivalent to more extended procedures. In this video, we present the case of a 72-year-old man presenting with a 2cm adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction. The clinical stage of the lesion was T1N0. A laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy with stapled circular esophagogastrostomy was decided upon. Five ports were placed. The left trocar incision was enlarged to introduce the circular stapler for the anastomoses and for specimen extraction. The procedure began with a complete abdominal exploration to rule out peritoneal metastases. The gastrocolic and gastrosplenic ligaments were divided with an ultrasonic scalpel. Short splenic vessels were clipped and divided and the greater curvature completely isolated with careful preservation of the gastroepiploic arcade and of the right gastroepiploic artery and vein. Left gastric vessels were divided at their origin with a vascular stapler and the distal esophagus was isolated through the diaphragmatic hiatus. A gastric tube was created with multiple applications of a linear stapler. The anvil of the circular stapler was secured to the esophageal stump with a hand-sewn purse-string suture in order to avoid the overlap of two suture lines. The esophagogastric anastomosis was then achieved with a circular stapler.
Proximal gastrectomy with stapled circular esophagogastrostomy: manual purse-string technique
C Battiston, D Citterio, L Conti, M Virdis, V Mazzaferro
35 views
1 day ago

Frequently asked questions (FAQ)

  • I. Video content
    Which type of video can I send as a contribution to WebSurg?
    Videos of minimally invasive surgery should be scientifically relevant, and deal with one of the specialties which can be found on the website. They should put forward a surgical technique or a surgical instrument, and bring something new or interesting to the medical community. If you have a video of an operation or a technique you are proud of, share it with the rest of the world !
    Can I send a video presenting an unusual / controversial technique?
    After you have sent us your video, the peer-review committee will review it and you will receive a detailed response concerning the approval or the refusal of your video. We do have a section dedicated to “unusual / controversial cases”, which could correspond to your video. We are happy to receive contributions featuring uncommon and pioneering techniques.
    Can I send a video in which the face of the patient is visible?
    The face of the patient should be blurred in the video. The patient should not be identifiable in any other way, anything that could cause the identification of the patient on any part of the body should be blurred. If you cannot do it we can take care of this for you.
    Can I add animations and personalize my video (sound, colors, illustrations)?
    The video should not have any background music, it can include some explanations from the surgeon, and should be presented using a neutral background. Some colors and illustrations can be added as long as they don’t take the focus away from the content of the video. If you have animations which can illustrate your operation, you can insert them into the video.
  • II. Validation process
  • III. Contributions and commercial brands
  • IV. Cost-related questions