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Hector OSEI

Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital
Saint Louis, MI, United States
MD
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Right thoracoscopic mediastinal mass resection and bronchial injury repair
The objective is to demonstrate our technique for thoracoscopic mediastinal mass excision with concomitant bronchial injury repair.
A 13-year-old boy presented with one-month of dysphagia and a history of a recent tick bite prophylactically treated. Esophagram showed a mid-esophageal externally compressing mass confirmed by endoscopy. Chest MRI showed a 5cm mediastinal mass. Differential diagnosis included infected esophageal duplication cyst versus histoplasmoma. A thoracoscopic mass resection was scheduled.
Upon accessing the right chest, a mid-thoracic lesion next to the esophagus was noted. The mass was adherent to the esophageal wall during dissection. Intraoperative biopsy revealed a cottage cheese-like substance in the mass. Frozen section suspected a duplication cyst in the esophageal musculature. As a result, we proceeded with the resection. The cavity was then irrigated and some fluid was noted at the endotracheal tube. A 5mm right mainstem bronchus tear was found. Flexible bronchoscopy was used to repair the injury with absorbable sutures. The mass was removed from the esophageal wall and repaired with absorbable sutures. A small pleural flap was created to prevent the sutures from communicating. The patient had a small persistent pneumothorax several days postoperatively. Repeat flexible bronchoscopy showed no leak or narrowing on postoperative day (POD) 7. The patient was discharged home on POD 8. Final pathology showed a mediastinal lymph node with a non-caseating granuloma. He had positive antibodies to Francisella tularensis (tularemia Ab). His final diagnosis was mediastinal tularemia.
This video demonstrates mediastinal mass diagnostic and treatment challenges. It also shows that concomitant bronchial injuries are safe and effective to repair thoracoscopically.
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
554 views
7 likes
0 comments
05:17
Right thoracoscopic mediastinal mass resection and bronchial injury repair
The objective is to demonstrate our technique for thoracoscopic mediastinal mass excision with concomitant bronchial injury repair.
A 13-year-old boy presented with one-month of dysphagia and a history of a recent tick bite prophylactically treated. Esophagram showed a mid-esophageal externally compressing mass confirmed by endoscopy. Chest MRI showed a 5cm mediastinal mass. Differential diagnosis included infected esophageal duplication cyst versus histoplasmoma. A thoracoscopic mass resection was scheduled.
Upon accessing the right chest, a mid-thoracic lesion next to the esophagus was noted. The mass was adherent to the esophageal wall during dissection. Intraoperative biopsy revealed a cottage cheese-like substance in the mass. Frozen section suspected a duplication cyst in the esophageal musculature. As a result, we proceeded with the resection. The cavity was then irrigated and some fluid was noted at the endotracheal tube. A 5mm right mainstem bronchus tear was found. Flexible bronchoscopy was used to repair the injury with absorbable sutures. The mass was removed from the esophageal wall and repaired with absorbable sutures. A small pleural flap was created to prevent the sutures from communicating. The patient had a small persistent pneumothorax several days postoperatively. Repeat flexible bronchoscopy showed no leak or narrowing on postoperative day (POD) 7. The patient was discharged home on POD 8. Final pathology showed a mediastinal lymph node with a non-caseating granuloma. He had positive antibodies to Francisella tularensis (tularemia Ab). His final diagnosis was mediastinal tularemia.
This video demonstrates mediastinal mass diagnostic and treatment challenges. It also shows that concomitant bronchial injuries are safe and effective to repair thoracoscopically.
Laparoscopic ligation of middle sacral artery and dissection of sacrococcygeal teratoma to decrease intraoperative hemorrhagic risk
Sacrococcygeal teratomas are the most common teratomas presenting at birth. Life-threatening bleeding is a major complication during tumor excision in children. In this video, we demonstrate our technique for the laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery during dissection of sacrococcygeal teratomas in two pediatric patients.
Two female infants diagnosed with type IV and type III sacrococcygeal teratomas underwent preoperative evaluation in the postnatal period. The first patient was an 18-month-old female patient who presented with a metastatic type IV teratoma resected after neoadjuvant therapy. The second patient was a 6-day-old female infant with a prenatal diagnosis of cystic type III teratoma. Using laparoscopy in both patients, the presacral space was reached by opening the peritoneal reflection with blunt dissection and the middle sacral artery was identified. It was then carefully isolated and divided with a 5mm LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device. The pelvic components of the tumors were partially dissected using laparoscopy. The first patient’s tumor resection was completed using a posterior sagittal approach and the second patient required a standard Chevron incision.
Both patients underwent a successful laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery and resection of the sacrococcygeal teratomas without complications. As a result, laparoscopic middle sacral artery division before sacrococcygeal teratoma excision offers a safe approach which can reduce the risk of hemorrhage during surgery.
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
777 views
5 likes
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05:33
Laparoscopic ligation of middle sacral artery and dissection of sacrococcygeal teratoma to decrease intraoperative hemorrhagic risk
Sacrococcygeal teratomas are the most common teratomas presenting at birth. Life-threatening bleeding is a major complication during tumor excision in children. In this video, we demonstrate our technique for the laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery during dissection of sacrococcygeal teratomas in two pediatric patients.
Two female infants diagnosed with type IV and type III sacrococcygeal teratomas underwent preoperative evaluation in the postnatal period. The first patient was an 18-month-old female patient who presented with a metastatic type IV teratoma resected after neoadjuvant therapy. The second patient was a 6-day-old female infant with a prenatal diagnosis of cystic type III teratoma. Using laparoscopy in both patients, the presacral space was reached by opening the peritoneal reflection with blunt dissection and the middle sacral artery was identified. It was then carefully isolated and divided with a 5mm LigaSure™ vessel-sealing device. The pelvic components of the tumors were partially dissected using laparoscopy. The first patient’s tumor resection was completed using a posterior sagittal approach and the second patient required a standard Chevron incision.
Both patients underwent a successful laparoscopic division of the middle sacral artery and resection of the sacrococcygeal teratomas without complications. As a result, laparoscopic middle sacral artery division before sacrococcygeal teratoma excision offers a safe approach which can reduce the risk of hemorrhage during surgery.