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Raphael LC ARAUJO

Barretos Cancer Hospital
Barretos, Brazil
MD, PhD
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Laparoscopic central hepatectomy using a Glissonian approach for hepatocellular adenoma
A 32-year-old asymptomatic female patient presented an incidental finding of a liver mass during pregnancy. The mass grew during pregnancy, and a biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma. On MRI, a hypodense 7 by 6.1cm mass with adipose infiltration was identified. Previously, it was a 5.8 by 5.1cm mass, located in liver segments IV, V, and VIII inferiorly.
The cystic duct and its artery were ligated. However, the gallbladder was kept in place for traction. After dissection of the anterior pedicle, a linear stapler was applied. The right lobe was mobilized and the right transection line was made according to the ischemia line of the anterior sector.
During the liver transection of segment IVB, the pedicle was identified, and linear stapling helped to control it. The parenchymal transection was performed with an ultrasonic scalpel and bipolar cautery. The liver surface of the anterior sector was demarcated and transected. Both the left and the right plane of transection were inferiorly joined. The middle and right hepatic vein branches were stapled.
The specimen was mobilized. Argon beam and bipolar forceps provided the hemostasis. The specimen was removed via a Pfannenstiel’s incision and a drain was placed. The duration of the procedure was 345 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 1200mL.
The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit on postoperative day 1 and from hospital on postoperative day 4. No complication was noted in 90 days. Pathological findings showed a mass of 10.7 by 8.4 by 4.8cm. The lesion represented a hepatocellular adenoma with negative margins.
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
797 views
3 likes
0 comments
09:00
Laparoscopic central hepatectomy using a Glissonian approach for hepatocellular adenoma
A 32-year-old asymptomatic female patient presented an incidental finding of a liver mass during pregnancy. The mass grew during pregnancy, and a biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of hepatocellular adenoma. On MRI, a hypodense 7 by 6.1cm mass with adipose infiltration was identified. Previously, it was a 5.8 by 5.1cm mass, located in liver segments IV, V, and VIII inferiorly.
The cystic duct and its artery were ligated. However, the gallbladder was kept in place for traction. After dissection of the anterior pedicle, a linear stapler was applied. The right lobe was mobilized and the right transection line was made according to the ischemia line of the anterior sector.
During the liver transection of segment IVB, the pedicle was identified, and linear stapling helped to control it. The parenchymal transection was performed with an ultrasonic scalpel and bipolar cautery. The liver surface of the anterior sector was demarcated and transected. Both the left and the right plane of transection were inferiorly joined. The middle and right hepatic vein branches were stapled.
The specimen was mobilized. Argon beam and bipolar forceps provided the hemostasis. The specimen was removed via a Pfannenstiel’s incision and a drain was placed. The duration of the procedure was 345 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 1200mL.
The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit on postoperative day 1 and from hospital on postoperative day 4. No complication was noted in 90 days. Pathological findings showed a mass of 10.7 by 8.4 by 4.8cm. The lesion represented a hepatocellular adenoma with negative margins.
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
Surgical intervention
5 months ago
1065 views
2 likes
0 comments
08:04
Robotic distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy
This is the case of a 73-year-old asymptomatic female patient who presented with an incidental pancreatic lesion on CT-scan. Her previous medical history was relevant for systemic lupus erythematosus. On the CT-scan, a single hypervascular lesion in the arterial phase was identified in the distal pancreas. The lesion size was 3.1 by 3.3 by 4.3cm. Neither suspicious nodes nor distant metastases were found. The patient was considered to be ASA2 and ECOG0.
The patient was placed in a reverse Trendelenburg position. A 12mm port was placed in the umbilicus for the camera, and three 8mm ports were inserted to accommodate the robotic arms, and another 12mm auxiliary port was used.
The greater curvature of the stomach was released from the transverse colon to expose the supramesocolic area. The neck of the pancreas was dissected close to the splenic-mesenteric confluence. The inferior mesenteric vein opening to the splenic vein was identified, clipped and cut. The splenic artery was dissected, clipped and cut close to the celiac trunk. A stapler was placed in the neck of the pancreas and it was safely stapled. The splenic vein was dissected close to the confluence, and then clipped and cut. The distal pancreas and splenic ligaments were cut and . detached. The specimen was removed using a Pfannenstiel’s incision.
The duration of the procedure was 255 minutes. The estimated blood loss was 100mL. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5 and no complication was observed over a period of 90 days. Pathology confirmed the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor (grade 2) as a 4cm single lesion and negative margins. One positive node was detected among 10 nodes harvested.
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5286 views
599 likes
0 comments
38:09
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
Robotic left lateral sectionectomy in cirrhotic liver
Background: Laparoscopy for cirrhotic patients can reduce intraoperative bleeding and postoperative morbidity when compared to open surgery. Liver robotic surgery remains a work in progress and only few series reported this approach for cirrhotic patients.
Methods: This is the case of a 62-year-old man with hepatitis C virus and alcoholic cirrhosis (MELD score 10, Child-Pugh score A6) with a single lesion in liver segment III and close to its pedicle.
Results: Intraoperative ultrasound was used to confirm findings on preoperative imaging.
Parenchymal transection was made with an ultrasonic scalpel, monopolar and bipolar cautery with no Pringle’s maneuver. Linear staplers were used to control left lobe inflow and outflow. The specimen was removed through a Pfannenstiel incision. The estimated blood loss was 100mL, and the postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed a 2.5cm hepatocellular carcinoma, with negative margins, and a cirrhotic parenchyma.
Conclusion: Robotic left lateral sectionectomy seems to be as feasible as the conventional laparoscopic approach in selected cirrhotic patients.
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1586 views
165 likes
0 comments
07:47
Robotic left lateral sectionectomy in cirrhotic liver
Background: Laparoscopy for cirrhotic patients can reduce intraoperative bleeding and postoperative morbidity when compared to open surgery. Liver robotic surgery remains a work in progress and only few series reported this approach for cirrhotic patients.
Methods: This is the case of a 62-year-old man with hepatitis C virus and alcoholic cirrhosis (MELD score 10, Child-Pugh score A6) with a single lesion in liver segment III and close to its pedicle.
Results: Intraoperative ultrasound was used to confirm findings on preoperative imaging.
Parenchymal transection was made with an ultrasonic scalpel, monopolar and bipolar cautery with no Pringle’s maneuver. Linear staplers were used to control left lobe inflow and outflow. The specimen was removed through a Pfannenstiel incision. The estimated blood loss was 100mL, and the postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed a 2.5cm hepatocellular carcinoma, with negative margins, and a cirrhotic parenchyma.
Conclusion: Robotic left lateral sectionectomy seems to be as feasible as the conventional laparoscopic approach in selected cirrhotic patients.