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Mário NORA

Centro Hospitalar Entre o Douro e Vouga
Santa Maria da Feira, Portugal
MD
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Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction for a terminal achalasia
Introduction: Idiopathic achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Generally, treatment is the "palliation" of symptoms and improvement in quality of life. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy is required in 5 to 10% of cases.
The authors present a case of a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction in a woman with long-term achalasia and megaesophagus.
Clinical case: A 54-year-old woman, with a previous history of a "psychological eating disorder", was referred to the Emergency Department. She complained of epigastric pain and dysphagia. A thoraco-abdominal CT-scan was requested and revealed a dilated, tortuous, sigmoid esophagus, filled with food content, with no identifiable mass causing obstruction. The patient was admitted to hospital and further study was performed --esophagogastroscopy and esophageal manometry - which confirmed the diagnosis of achalasia with esophageal aperistalses.
The patient was proposed a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction.
No complications were reported in the postoperative period, and discharge was possible on postoperative day 7. Six months later, an esophagram showed adequate contrast passage and progression.
Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy as a primary treatment of achalasia might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are contraindications to a more conservative approach.
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
3597 views
290 likes
0 comments
09:29
Laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction for a terminal achalasia
Introduction: Idiopathic achalasia is the most frequent esophageal motility disorder. Generally, treatment is the "palliation" of symptoms and improvement in quality of life. Although Heller myotomy is the standard treatment, achieving good results in 90 to 95% of cases, esophagectomy is required in 5 to 10% of cases.
The authors present a case of a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction in a woman with long-term achalasia and megaesophagus.
Clinical case: A 54-year-old woman, with a previous history of a "psychological eating disorder", was referred to the Emergency Department. She complained of epigastric pain and dysphagia. A thoraco-abdominal CT-scan was requested and revealed a dilated, tortuous, sigmoid esophagus, filled with food content, with no identifiable mass causing obstruction. The patient was admitted to hospital and further study was performed --esophagogastroscopy and esophageal manometry - which confirmed the diagnosis of achalasia with esophageal aperistalses.
The patient was proposed a laparoscopic transhiatal esophagectomy with Akiyama tube reconstruction.
No complications were reported in the postoperative period, and discharge was possible on postoperative day 7. Six months later, an esophagram showed adequate contrast passage and progression.
Discussion/Conclusion: Esophagectomy as a primary treatment of achalasia might be considered if severe symptomatic (dysphagia, regurgitation), anatomical (megaesophagus) or functional (esophagus aperistalses) disorders are contraindications to a more conservative approach.
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
669 views
106 likes
0 comments
09:55
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.