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Guillaume PRUNIÈRES

Centre de Chirurgie Orthopédique et de la Main
Illkirch-Graffenstaden, France
MD
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Konnyaku shirataki model for training in robotic microsurgery anastomosis
The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of a type of Japanese noodle, named ‘shirataki konnyaku’, for microsurgery training in the operating room. Thirteen surgical residents without experience in microsurgery had to perform two microsurgical anastomoses: one in a model of a femoral artery of a rat (control) and one in a model of a konnyaku shirataki. Two quantitative variables (time in minutes and number of stitches to perform the anastomosis) and two qualitative variables (patency and tightness of the anastomosis) were measured. Sixty anastomoses were performed with the control model and 62 anastomoses with the konnyaku model. The time of the anastomosis was significantly higher in the control group. The number of stitches was similar in both groups. The patency of the anastomosis was significantly lower in the control group. The tightness (no leak) of the anastomosis was significantly higher in the control group. The ‘konnyaku shirataki’ model could improve the teaching of microsurgery due to its availability, low cost, and structural similarity to the animal model.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
409 views
6 likes
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01:45
Konnyaku shirataki model for training in robotic microsurgery anastomosis
The aim of this study was to test the feasibility of a type of Japanese noodle, named ‘shirataki konnyaku’, for microsurgery training in the operating room. Thirteen surgical residents without experience in microsurgery had to perform two microsurgical anastomoses: one in a model of a femoral artery of a rat (control) and one in a model of a konnyaku shirataki. Two quantitative variables (time in minutes and number of stitches to perform the anastomosis) and two qualitative variables (patency and tightness of the anastomosis) were measured. Sixty anastomoses were performed with the control model and 62 anastomoses with the konnyaku model. The time of the anastomosis was significantly higher in the control group. The number of stitches was similar in both groups. The patency of the anastomosis was significantly lower in the control group. The tightness (no leak) of the anastomosis was significantly higher in the control group. The ‘konnyaku shirataki’ model could improve the teaching of microsurgery due to its availability, low cost, and structural similarity to the animal model.
Use of Konnyaku Shirataki for robotic microsurgery training
The aim of this study was to test the potential implementation of a type of Japanese noodle, named konnyaku shirataki, for microsurgery training in the operating room.
Thirteen surgical residents without experience in microsurgery had to perform two microsurgical anastomoses: rat femoral artery model (control) and one on a konnyaku shirataki model. Two quantitative variables (time in minutes and number of stitches to perform the anastomosis) and two qualitative variables (patency and watertightness of the anastomosis) were measured. Sixty anastomoses were performed with the control model and 62 anastomoses with the konnyaku model. The time of the anatomosis was significantly higher in the control group. The number of stitches was similar in the 2 groups. Patency of the anastomosis was significantly lower in the control group. Watertightness of the anastomosis was significantly higher in the control group.
The konnyaku shirataki model, by its availability, low cost and close structure to the animal model could improve the teaching of microsurgery and tele-microsurgery (robotic microsurgery).
Lecture
5 years ago
288 views
6 likes
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07:54
Use of Konnyaku Shirataki for robotic microsurgery training
The aim of this study was to test the potential implementation of a type of Japanese noodle, named konnyaku shirataki, for microsurgery training in the operating room.
Thirteen surgical residents without experience in microsurgery had to perform two microsurgical anastomoses: rat femoral artery model (control) and one on a konnyaku shirataki model. Two quantitative variables (time in minutes and number of stitches to perform the anastomosis) and two qualitative variables (patency and watertightness of the anastomosis) were measured. Sixty anastomoses were performed with the control model and 62 anastomoses with the konnyaku model. The time of the anatomosis was significantly higher in the control group. The number of stitches was similar in the 2 groups. Patency of the anastomosis was significantly lower in the control group. Watertightness of the anastomosis was significantly higher in the control group.
The konnyaku shirataki model, by its availability, low cost and close structure to the animal model could improve the teaching of microsurgery and tele-microsurgery (robotic microsurgery).