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Jean-Marc BASTE

Hôpital Charles Nicolle
Rouen, France
MD, PhD
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Complex robotic resection of a large middle mediastinal thymoma
A 62-year-old man had an asymptomatic middle mediastinal tumor with a 4.5cm diameter, opposite to the superior vena cava and the azygos vein in the Barety’s space, which was discovered on thoracic CT-scan performed during an urothelial tumor follow-up.
Past history includes an urothelial carcinoma grade I treated with transurethral cystectomy, an ischemic cardiopathy with a single medical treatment, a prostate hypertrophy, and a sigmoid diverticulosis.
After a multidisciplinary review of the case, a mediastinoscopy was performed. It demonstrated the presence of a thymoma.
The patient was well informed of the operative risks and of the possibility of conversion, but thanks to our experience and national recommendations, we were able to perform a radical robotic assisted thymectomy.
The operation took during 3 hours with less than 100cc of bleeding.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Histopathological analysis showed a type AB thymoma according to the OMS 2015 classification. The staging was IIb according to Masaoka. No adjuvant radiotherapy was indicated.
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
853 views
65 likes
1 comment
07:38
Complex robotic resection of a large middle mediastinal thymoma
A 62-year-old man had an asymptomatic middle mediastinal tumor with a 4.5cm diameter, opposite to the superior vena cava and the azygos vein in the Barety’s space, which was discovered on thoracic CT-scan performed during an urothelial tumor follow-up.
Past history includes an urothelial carcinoma grade I treated with transurethral cystectomy, an ischemic cardiopathy with a single medical treatment, a prostate hypertrophy, and a sigmoid diverticulosis.
After a multidisciplinary review of the case, a mediastinoscopy was performed. It demonstrated the presence of a thymoma.
The patient was well informed of the operative risks and of the possibility of conversion, but thanks to our experience and national recommendations, we were able to perform a radical robotic assisted thymectomy.
The operation took during 3 hours with less than 100cc of bleeding.
The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Histopathological analysis showed a type AB thymoma according to the OMS 2015 classification. The staging was IIb according to Masaoka. No adjuvant radiotherapy was indicated.
Right upper lobectomy: how I do it?
The anterior approach to right upper lobectomies is the most standard one, although it is not always the easiest one. As stressed by Dr. Baste, anterior dissection of the hilum can be hazardous and requires attention. Based on demonstrative pictures and videos, Dr. Baste outlines the global preoperative and intraoperative approach used routinely at Rouen’s Teaching Hospital. The description of the technique is mainly inspired from the Danish team (Hansen et al., Surgical Endoscopy). Surgical safety is one of the key objectives of this approach with preventative methods and intraoperative management techniques in case of injury. Preoperatively, CT-scan analysis is highlighted and patient set-up is described.
The intraoperative step is also described meticulously, and notably the D-zone, which represents the most dangerous zone during the resection.
Lecture
3 years ago
1257 views
92 likes
0 comments
13:30
Right upper lobectomy: how I do it?
The anterior approach to right upper lobectomies is the most standard one, although it is not always the easiest one. As stressed by Dr. Baste, anterior dissection of the hilum can be hazardous and requires attention. Based on demonstrative pictures and videos, Dr. Baste outlines the global preoperative and intraoperative approach used routinely at Rouen’s Teaching Hospital. The description of the technique is mainly inspired from the Danish team (Hansen et al., Surgical Endoscopy). Surgical safety is one of the key objectives of this approach with preventative methods and intraoperative management techniques in case of injury. Preoperatively, CT-scan analysis is highlighted and patient set-up is described.
The intraoperative step is also described meticulously, and notably the D-zone, which represents the most dangerous zone during the resection.
Right upper lobectomy for large apical tuberculosis cavity using videothoracoscopy: focus on the use of curved endoscopic instruments
A 36-year-old patient was treated for tuberculosis for two years in Georgia. However, treatment failed. After a 3-month treatment in France, CT-scan showed a persistent tuberculous cavity in the right upper lobe, which seemed totally destroyed, associated with bilateral opacities. The patient was still multi-bacillary. A right upper lobectomy by videothoracoscopy was performed. Dissection of the right upper lobe, fully retracted on the apex, was facilitated by the use of an ENSEAL® G2 articulating tissue sealer (Ethicon Endosurgery), a curved vacuum, and the ENDOEYE FLEX 3D (Olympus) articulated camera. The ENSEAL® articulated bipolar forceps facilitated the perpendicular approach to the superior lobar vessels, which were all sheathed by inflamed tissues, and improved dissection of retractile adhesions to the pulmonary apex and mediastinum. It made the handling of hemorrhagic tissue easier. The 3D camera allowed an accurate visualization of these complex anatomical relationships. Drains were removed on postoperative day 6. The BK sputum was negative postoperatively and at 5 months. CT-scan at 2 months is satisfactory with a regression of bilateral opacities. Videothoracoscopy using articulated endoscopic instruments is a relevant technique for the resection of tuberculous lesions, even when lesions are large and retractile.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
997 views
36 likes
0 comments
07:35
Right upper lobectomy for large apical tuberculosis cavity using videothoracoscopy: focus on the use of curved endoscopic instruments
A 36-year-old patient was treated for tuberculosis for two years in Georgia. However, treatment failed. After a 3-month treatment in France, CT-scan showed a persistent tuberculous cavity in the right upper lobe, which seemed totally destroyed, associated with bilateral opacities. The patient was still multi-bacillary. A right upper lobectomy by videothoracoscopy was performed. Dissection of the right upper lobe, fully retracted on the apex, was facilitated by the use of an ENSEAL® G2 articulating tissue sealer (Ethicon Endosurgery), a curved vacuum, and the ENDOEYE FLEX 3D (Olympus) articulated camera. The ENSEAL® articulated bipolar forceps facilitated the perpendicular approach to the superior lobar vessels, which were all sheathed by inflamed tissues, and improved dissection of retractile adhesions to the pulmonary apex and mediastinum. It made the handling of hemorrhagic tissue easier. The 3D camera allowed an accurate visualization of these complex anatomical relationships. Drains were removed on postoperative day 6. The BK sputum was negative postoperatively and at 5 months. CT-scan at 2 months is satisfactory with a regression of bilateral opacities. Videothoracoscopy using articulated endoscopic instruments is a relevant technique for the resection of tuberculous lesions, even when lesions are large and retractile.
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
617 views
14 likes
0 comments
09:09
Robot-assisted thoracic resection of an extended esophageal leiomyoma
Objective:
Leiomyomas represent approximately 70% of all benign esophageal tumors. In most cases, patients are asymptomatic, but others can present chest pain, dysphagia or weight loss. Even if malignization is rare, surgery is indicated. Laparoscopy is the most common approach because of the frequency of leiomyoma localization on the lower esophagus. However, thoracoscopy is also commonly performed with some difficulties in case of large tumors.
Our objective is to demonstrate the robotic approach and the bipolar Maryland forceps used for such a specific lesion.

Case presentation:
We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with no particular co-morbidity. On CT-scan, she was incidentally diagnosed with a leiomyoma for Guillain-Barre syndrome. A homogeneous 7cm tumor was found on the left side of the middle esophagus with a horseshoe-shaped aspect typical of leiomyoma. Check-up was completed by MRI and endoscopic ultrasonography, which tended to confirm the diagnosis.
In this video, the robot-assisted thoracic enucleation of the tumor performed by a left approach shows the quality of esophageal exposure and tumor dissection by means of a bipolar Maryland forceps. Blood loss was less than 30mL, and the postoperative period was uneventful. Histological analysis confirmed the diagnosis of leiomyoma.

Conclusion:
Robot-assisted resection of benign esophageal tumors is a safe procedure, especially for intrathoracic tumors. This technique provides a better view and easier dissection. The use of a bipolar Maryland forceps allows for a safer procedure. Day care surgery could then be expected for smaller lesions.
Robotic assisted resection of a complex thymoma
Our objective is to demonstrate the management of a very complex mediastinal tumor. To do so, a minimally invasive resection is used, highlighting the benefit of a robotic approach.
The present case is that of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with an anterior mediastinal mass discovered during myasthenia assessment with positive antibodies.
The tumor was in contact with the aorta, pulmonary artery, and the innominate vein with probable pericardial invasion.
Given such a complex localization, the challenge was to propose a radical resection using minimally invasive surgery with robotic assistance.
As compared to a VATS approach, a robotic approach provides a better view and instruments to achieve complete resection in complex mediastinal tumor. What is important to first control on the CT-scan is the size of the tumor as compared to the thoracic cavity’s size which will allow robotic surgery with a good operative field.
Pericardial resection associated with a lateral plasty of the innominate vein were required to achieved complete R0 resection. The entire resection was performed using a bipolar forceps.
The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient is discharged on postopeartive day 3. The phrenic nerve was preserved.
Pathological analysis of the operative specimen is evocative of a B1 thymoma classified IIb on the Masaoka staging system with complete R0 resection (margins were clear).
The entire file was discussed at the Rhythmic meeting, which is the national meeting for thymoma tumor management held every two weeks. A simple survey was put forward without any adjuvant radiotherapy.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1180 views
26 likes
0 comments
07:19
Robotic assisted resection of a complex thymoma
Our objective is to demonstrate the management of a very complex mediastinal tumor. To do so, a minimally invasive resection is used, highlighting the benefit of a robotic approach.
The present case is that of a 64-year-old patient diagnosed with an anterior mediastinal mass discovered during myasthenia assessment with positive antibodies.
The tumor was in contact with the aorta, pulmonary artery, and the innominate vein with probable pericardial invasion.
Given such a complex localization, the challenge was to propose a radical resection using minimally invasive surgery with robotic assistance.
As compared to a VATS approach, a robotic approach provides a better view and instruments to achieve complete resection in complex mediastinal tumor. What is important to first control on the CT-scan is the size of the tumor as compared to the thoracic cavity’s size which will allow robotic surgery with a good operative field.
Pericardial resection associated with a lateral plasty of the innominate vein were required to achieved complete R0 resection. The entire resection was performed using a bipolar forceps.
The postoperative course was uneventful. The patient is discharged on postopeartive day 3. The phrenic nerve was preserved.
Pathological analysis of the operative specimen is evocative of a B1 thymoma classified IIb on the Masaoka staging system with complete R0 resection (margins were clear).
The entire file was discussed at the Rhythmic meeting, which is the national meeting for thymoma tumor management held every two weeks. A simple survey was put forward without any adjuvant radiotherapy.
Robot-assisted thoracoscopic right superior lobectomy with conversion for controlled bleeding: a complex case
As the technique and the indications of robotic video-assisted lung resections have evolved, surgeons have had to face numerous pitfalls. One in particular is the vascular tear, which urge the operator to convert to thoracotomy. The decision as to when and how to convert to thoracotomy is always difficult to make. This video illustrates a complex case of robotic right upper lobectomy which required thoracotomy for controlled bleeding.
This is the case of a 47-year-old woman with a past medical history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, active smoking, alcoholic liver cirrhosis, but no history of tuberculosis. She presented with a 3-month history of a right upper lobar mass detected on chest X-ray which evolved despite antibiotic treatment. Work-up including a PET-scan evoked a suspicion of malignancy.

While finishing the lobectomy, we had to face a difficult dissection of the posterior part of the oblique fissure with a tricky control of the dorsal artery. Trying to open the fissure with the endostapler, we tore the arterial branch and applied an immediate control by means of a double Cadiere grasper. When bleeding was finally controlled, we decided to convert for safety reasons. We proceeded without undocking the last robotic arm, clamping the artery until control was achieved using thoracotomy instruments. It allowed us to manage this situation with no rush and stress.
There are two types of bleeding: controlled and uncontrolled. In our experience of RATS lobectomy and by reviewing our complications, we feel that there are several advantages to this technique: first, small instruments make small injuries which can be controlled by robotic instrument. Secondly, passive locking of the robotic arm provides sufficient time for the surgical team to prepare conversion.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1027 views
35 likes
0 comments
08:59
Robot-assisted thoracoscopic right superior lobectomy with conversion for controlled bleeding: a complex case
As the technique and the indications of robotic video-assisted lung resections have evolved, surgeons have had to face numerous pitfalls. One in particular is the vascular tear, which urge the operator to convert to thoracotomy. The decision as to when and how to convert to thoracotomy is always difficult to make. This video illustrates a complex case of robotic right upper lobectomy which required thoracotomy for controlled bleeding.
This is the case of a 47-year-old woman with a past medical history of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, active smoking, alcoholic liver cirrhosis, but no history of tuberculosis. She presented with a 3-month history of a right upper lobar mass detected on chest X-ray which evolved despite antibiotic treatment. Work-up including a PET-scan evoked a suspicion of malignancy.

While finishing the lobectomy, we had to face a difficult dissection of the posterior part of the oblique fissure with a tricky control of the dorsal artery. Trying to open the fissure with the endostapler, we tore the arterial branch and applied an immediate control by means of a double Cadiere grasper. When bleeding was finally controlled, we decided to convert for safety reasons. We proceeded without undocking the last robotic arm, clamping the artery until control was achieved using thoracotomy instruments. It allowed us to manage this situation with no rush and stress.
There are two types of bleeding: controlled and uncontrolled. In our experience of RATS lobectomy and by reviewing our complications, we feel that there are several advantages to this technique: first, small instruments make small injuries which can be controlled by robotic instrument. Secondly, passive locking of the robotic arm provides sufficient time for the surgical team to prepare conversion.
Safety in complex VATS lobectomy: how to secure your procedure
Objective
As surgical teams performing video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy procedures improve in technicality, surgeons have to face more complex cases which could not be handled without an open thoracotomy before. Consequently, unexpected events occur and safety measures must be implemented in order to prevent whatever could be prevented. Clinical videos have become a very powerful tool that allow surgeons from the world over to share their experience on the matter.

Methods
In this video, routine safety procedures used in our center are illustrated. The case presented is that of a 52-year-old woman with a clinical stage IIIA (T3N1M0) mass at the left upper lobe. CT-scan showed a close relationship between the tumor and the first upper lobar branch. In many centers, this would often contraindicate a minimally invasive approach.

Results
A preoperative assessment is crucial in order to anticipate the anatomy of the area. CT-scan reconstruction is of great importance whenever the surgeon requires it. The procedure is begun with an extended safety checklist including the availability of conversion instruments and a second suction line as major ‘’go/no go’’ factors. The anterior approach of the hilum allows for a control of both arterial and venous structures using vessel loops.

Conclusions
Our technique allows to routinely perform safe and reproducible complex cases of VATS lobectomy.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1167 views
23 likes
0 comments
10:27
Safety in complex VATS lobectomy: how to secure your procedure
Objective
As surgical teams performing video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) lobectomy procedures improve in technicality, surgeons have to face more complex cases which could not be handled without an open thoracotomy before. Consequently, unexpected events occur and safety measures must be implemented in order to prevent whatever could be prevented. Clinical videos have become a very powerful tool that allow surgeons from the world over to share their experience on the matter.

Methods
In this video, routine safety procedures used in our center are illustrated. The case presented is that of a 52-year-old woman with a clinical stage IIIA (T3N1M0) mass at the left upper lobe. CT-scan showed a close relationship between the tumor and the first upper lobar branch. In many centers, this would often contraindicate a minimally invasive approach.

Results
A preoperative assessment is crucial in order to anticipate the anatomy of the area. CT-scan reconstruction is of great importance whenever the surgeon requires it. The procedure is begun with an extended safety checklist including the availability of conversion instruments and a second suction line as major ‘’go/no go’’ factors. The anterior approach of the hilum allows for a control of both arterial and venous structures using vessel loops.

Conclusions
Our technique allows to routinely perform safe and reproducible complex cases of VATS lobectomy.
Complex left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy by robotic assisted thoracoscopy (CPRL-3) for cT2N2 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)
This video demonstrates a left upper lobectomy for the management of a proximal cT2N2M0 lung tumor. It is usually considered a contraindication of minimally invasive surgery. Our aim is to show the feasibility and the safety of the procedure. Robotic surgery will allow for more minimally invasive indications.
The tumor lies proximally to the left trunk of the pulmonary artery which could be a contraindication to a minimally invasive surgery. A CT-scan combined with a 3D reconstruction helps to rule out the existence of pulmonary artery invasion. Hilar adenopathies as well as adenopathies of the aortopulmonary window present a hypermetabolism on PET-scan. No neoadjuvant chemotherapy is performed since a R0 surgery is potentially feasible immediately and can be associated with a full lymphadenectomy.
This video presents our technique of robotically assisted left upper lobectomy combined with a lymph node dissection. We have attempted to standardize our lung resection technique using 6 areas of dissection to gain in efficacy and save time. The first operative step is to free the triangular ligament and to sample potential lymph nodes (station No. 9). A hilar lymphadenectomy (lymph node station No. 10) is then performed using a posterior approach first followed by a subcarinal approach (lymph node #7, by skeletonizing the pulmonary artery and the left main bronchus. The third step of the procedure is to dissect the fissure to skeletonize the pulmonary artery and its lingular branches as well as branches of the posterior fissure, dissection of lymph node stations No. 11 is performed simultaneously. The elements of the hilum are then approached using an anterior approach. The superior pulmonary vein is dissected. The roof of the hilum is then freed. The left upper bronchus is divided last. Dissection of lymph node station No. 5 completes the procedure with preservation of the left recurrent nerve
Abbreviation:
CPRL-3: complete portal robotic lobectomy using 3 arms
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
783 views
18 likes
0 comments
11:07
Complex left upper lobectomy with lymphadenectomy by robotic assisted thoracoscopy (CPRL-3) for cT2N2 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC)
This video demonstrates a left upper lobectomy for the management of a proximal cT2N2M0 lung tumor. It is usually considered a contraindication of minimally invasive surgery. Our aim is to show the feasibility and the safety of the procedure. Robotic surgery will allow for more minimally invasive indications.
The tumor lies proximally to the left trunk of the pulmonary artery which could be a contraindication to a minimally invasive surgery. A CT-scan combined with a 3D reconstruction helps to rule out the existence of pulmonary artery invasion. Hilar adenopathies as well as adenopathies of the aortopulmonary window present a hypermetabolism on PET-scan. No neoadjuvant chemotherapy is performed since a R0 surgery is potentially feasible immediately and can be associated with a full lymphadenectomy.
This video presents our technique of robotically assisted left upper lobectomy combined with a lymph node dissection. We have attempted to standardize our lung resection technique using 6 areas of dissection to gain in efficacy and save time. The first operative step is to free the triangular ligament and to sample potential lymph nodes (station No. 9). A hilar lymphadenectomy (lymph node station No. 10) is then performed using a posterior approach first followed by a subcarinal approach (lymph node #7, by skeletonizing the pulmonary artery and the left main bronchus. The third step of the procedure is to dissect the fissure to skeletonize the pulmonary artery and its lingular branches as well as branches of the posterior fissure, dissection of lymph node stations No. 11 is performed simultaneously. The elements of the hilum are then approached using an anterior approach. The superior pulmonary vein is dissected. The roof of the hilum is then freed. The left upper bronchus is divided last. Dissection of lymph node station No. 5 completes the procedure with preservation of the left recurrent nerve
Abbreviation:
CPRL-3: complete portal robotic lobectomy using 3 arms
Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1054 views
29 likes
0 comments
06:54
Robot-assisted left video thoracoscopic partial thymectomy for mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma
This film presents the case of an 85-year-old man who suffered from primary hyperparathyroidism diagnosed on a pathological cervical fracture and elevated laboratory values for parathyroid hormone and calcium. Preoperative localizing studies showed no anomalies on the parathyroid gland. However, a left anterior mediastinal ectopic parathyroid adenoma was found on 99m Tc-MIBI scintigraphy.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenomas can be resected in a minimally invasive fashion via a conventional transcervical approach, or using a video-assisted thoracoscopic resection, allowing for an access to the lower cervical area without the use of a cervicotomy. Robotic-assisted thoracic surgery (RATS) also allows for a better visualization and less instrument crowding, with no difference in clinical results.
Considering the good efficacy and the better chances not to leave tumor tissue missed out during surgery, and the impossibility to install the patient with cervical hyperextension, we decided to perform a robot-assisted thoracoscopy through a left-sided approach, instead of the conventional transcervical approach.
During the intraoperative period, the adenoma was identified, and we did not feel the need to perform PTH assay. There were no complications in the postoperative period. PTH levels reached a normal range after adenoma removal, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. He remains asymptomatic at 3 months after the intervention.
The robotic resection of an intrathymic parathyroid adenoma is a safe and effective alternative to the conventional transcervical approach.
Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS): middle lower bilobectomy with lymph nodes dissection for carcinoid tumor
Objective
Carcinoid tumors represent less than 5% of the bronchopulmonary cancers [1], but often concern young people. A lung-sparing anatomical resection is often preferred if possible [2]. However, an uneasy intrabronchial localization mandates a major resection such as bilobectomy and/or sometimes pneumonectomy for complete resection as it is the aim of carcinoid tumor treatment. This can be achieved using a minimally invasive approach [3, 4].
Case presentation
This is the case of a 34-year-old woman suffering from recurrent right pneumopathy, without any other medical history. A mass in the middle lobe bronchus with partial obstruction of the intermedius bronchus was found on CT-scan. Bronchoscopy found the extension of a strawberry-like tumor until segment 6 bronchus. Histopathology confirmed the presence of a carcinoid tumor. A radical excision with middle lower bilobectomy by VATS was decided upon rather than middle lobe sleeve lobectomy in order to ensure complete resection.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The operative specimen contained the tumor. Vascular and bronchial resections were free. Histopathology confirmed a typical pT1N0 carcinoid tumor.
Conclusion
Complete middle lower bilobectomy can be performed using a VATS approach. This therapeutic option seems worthwhile in young people because of low postoperative morbidity and fast recovery for active people.

Bibliographic references
1. Fink G, Krelbaum T, Yellin A, Bendayan D, Saute M, Glazer M, Kramer MR. Pulmonary carcinoid: presentation, diagnosis, and outcome in 142 cases in Israel and review of 640 cases from the literature. Chest 2001;119:1647-51.
2. Schrevens L, Vansteenkiste J, Deneffe G, De Leyn P, Verbeken E, Vandenberghe T, Demedts M. Clinical-radiological presentation and outcome of surgically treated pulmonary carcinoid tumours: a long-term single institution experience. Lung Cancer 2004;43:39-45.
3. Hansen HJ, Petersen RH, Christensen M. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy using a standardized anterior approach. Lung Cancer 2011;71,25(4):1263-9.
4. Walker WS, Codispoti M, Soon SY, Stamenkovic S, Carnochan F, Pugh G. Long-term outcomes following VATS lobectomy for non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma. Eur J Cardiothoracic Surg 2003;23:397-402.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1280 views
20 likes
0 comments
07:26
Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS): middle lower bilobectomy with lymph nodes dissection for carcinoid tumor
Objective
Carcinoid tumors represent less than 5% of the bronchopulmonary cancers [1], but often concern young people. A lung-sparing anatomical resection is often preferred if possible [2]. However, an uneasy intrabronchial localization mandates a major resection such as bilobectomy and/or sometimes pneumonectomy for complete resection as it is the aim of carcinoid tumor treatment. This can be achieved using a minimally invasive approach [3, 4].
Case presentation
This is the case of a 34-year-old woman suffering from recurrent right pneumopathy, without any other medical history. A mass in the middle lobe bronchus with partial obstruction of the intermedius bronchus was found on CT-scan. Bronchoscopy found the extension of a strawberry-like tumor until segment 6 bronchus. Histopathology confirmed the presence of a carcinoid tumor. A radical excision with middle lower bilobectomy by VATS was decided upon rather than middle lobe sleeve lobectomy in order to ensure complete resection.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The operative specimen contained the tumor. Vascular and bronchial resections were free. Histopathology confirmed a typical pT1N0 carcinoid tumor.
Conclusion
Complete middle lower bilobectomy can be performed using a VATS approach. This therapeutic option seems worthwhile in young people because of low postoperative morbidity and fast recovery for active people.

Bibliographic references
1. Fink G, Krelbaum T, Yellin A, Bendayan D, Saute M, Glazer M, Kramer MR. Pulmonary carcinoid: presentation, diagnosis, and outcome in 142 cases in Israel and review of 640 cases from the literature. Chest 2001;119:1647-51.
2. Schrevens L, Vansteenkiste J, Deneffe G, De Leyn P, Verbeken E, Vandenberghe T, Demedts M. Clinical-radiological presentation and outcome of surgically treated pulmonary carcinoid tumours: a long-term single institution experience. Lung Cancer 2004;43:39-45.
3. Hansen HJ, Petersen RH, Christensen M. Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy using a standardized anterior approach. Lung Cancer 2011;71,25(4):1263-9.
4. Walker WS, Codispoti M, Soon SY, Stamenkovic S, Carnochan F, Pugh G. Long-term outcomes following VATS lobectomy for non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma. Eur J Cardiothoracic Surg 2003;23:397-402.
Full endoscopic robot-assisted basal segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
Objective
Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis is often proposed in complicated situations [1]. The development of minimally invasive surgery should allow us to propose a surgical curative treatment with preventative purposes. In this video, we describe a lung-sparing surgery using a full endoscopic robotic segmentectomy as described by Dylewsky [2] to deal with localized bronchiectasis.
Case presentation
This is the case of a 40-year-old man with bronchiectasis, colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with antibiotic resistance. The patient suffered from recurrent infections. Bronchiectasis is localized in the left basal segments on CT-scan. Basal segmentectomy was decided upon using a robot-assisted procedure. This kind of patient is usually treated medically with iterative antibiotherapy until a new complication occurs.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The patient resumed work after one month without any complaint.
Conclusion
When using a precise resection, basal segmentectomy seems to be feasible using a robot-assisted procedure, without increasing perioperative morbidity. This procedure should be proposed as a preventative surgery as it is a relatively new approach for benign or infectious lung disease.
Bibliographic references
1. Agasthian T. Results of surgery for bronchiectasis and pulmonary abscesses. Thorac Surg Clin. 2012;22:333-44.
2. Dylewski MR, Ohaeto AC, Pereira JF. Pulmonary resection using a total endoscopic robotic video-assisted approach. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011;23:36-42.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
284 views
4 likes
0 comments
07:42
Full endoscopic robot-assisted basal segmentectomy for bronchiectasis
Objective
Surgical treatment of bronchiectasis is often proposed in complicated situations [1]. The development of minimally invasive surgery should allow us to propose a surgical curative treatment with preventative purposes. In this video, we describe a lung-sparing surgery using a full endoscopic robotic segmentectomy as described by Dylewsky [2] to deal with localized bronchiectasis.
Case presentation
This is the case of a 40-year-old man with bronchiectasis, colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa with antibiotic resistance. The patient suffered from recurrent infections. Bronchiectasis is localized in the left basal segments on CT-scan. Basal segmentectomy was decided upon using a robot-assisted procedure. This kind of patient is usually treated medically with iterative antibiotherapy until a new complication occurs.
Results
There was no postoperative complication and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. The patient resumed work after one month without any complaint.
Conclusion
When using a precise resection, basal segmentectomy seems to be feasible using a robot-assisted procedure, without increasing perioperative morbidity. This procedure should be proposed as a preventative surgery as it is a relatively new approach for benign or infectious lung disease.
Bibliographic references
1. Agasthian T. Results of surgery for bronchiectasis and pulmonary abscesses. Thorac Surg Clin. 2012;22:333-44.
2. Dylewski MR, Ohaeto AC, Pereira JF. Pulmonary resection using a total endoscopic robotic video-assisted approach. Semin Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011;23:36-42.
Full endoscopic robot-assisted trisegmentectomy of the pulmonary left upper lobe for diagnosis and treatment
Objective:
When small pulmonary lesions are discovered on CT-scan during cancer surveillance, the differentiation between primary cancer metastasis and another metachronous carcinoma is impossible on frozen section. In this context, segmentectomy as sparing-lung resection is probably a valuable option to treat both lesions. However, segmentectomy is a complex procedure when using video thoracoscopy. Robotic segmentectomy, as described by Ninan (1) and Melfi (2), could be a more accurate and easier approach. Our objective is to show this reproducible technique.

Bibliographic references:
1. Ninan M, Dylewski MR. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2.
2. Melfi FM, Menconi GF, Mariani AM, Angeletti CA. Early experience with robotic technology for thoracoscopic surgery. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2002;21:864-8.
Materials and methods:
In 2006, a 78-year-old man was found with a medical history of asbestos exposure and colonic adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis treated by hemi-colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. During colon cancer surveillance, a centrimetric pulmonary mass of the left upper lobe was found on CT-scan in September 2012. In this context, the lesion was suggestive of metastasis, but primary lung cancer could not be ruled out (due to the patient’s history of smoking). As a result, trisegmentectomy of the left upper lobe was decided upon instead of wedge resection, for diagnosis and treatment of the lesion.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful, with a medical discharge on the fourth day following trisegmentectomy. Pathological findings concluded to a primary lung carcinoma without lymph node invasion.
Conclusion: Complete and precise segmentectomy can be performed safely by means of the da Vinci™ robotic system, without using a utility thoracotomy. This diagnostic and therapeutic option must be considered in case of small pulmonary lesions occurring during cancer surveillance.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1125 views
6 likes
0 comments
11:42
Full endoscopic robot-assisted trisegmentectomy of the pulmonary left upper lobe for diagnosis and treatment
Objective:
When small pulmonary lesions are discovered on CT-scan during cancer surveillance, the differentiation between primary cancer metastasis and another metachronous carcinoma is impossible on frozen section. In this context, segmentectomy as sparing-lung resection is probably a valuable option to treat both lesions. However, segmentectomy is a complex procedure when using video thoracoscopy. Robotic segmentectomy, as described by Ninan (1) and Melfi (2), could be a more accurate and easier approach. Our objective is to show this reproducible technique.

Bibliographic references:
1. Ninan M, Dylewski MR. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2.
2. Melfi FM, Menconi GF, Mariani AM, Angeletti CA. Early experience with robotic technology for thoracoscopic surgery. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2002;21:864-8.
Materials and methods:
In 2006, a 78-year-old man was found with a medical history of asbestos exposure and colonic adenocarcinoma with lymph node metastasis treated by hemi-colectomy and adjuvant chemotherapy. During colon cancer surveillance, a centrimetric pulmonary mass of the left upper lobe was found on CT-scan in September 2012. In this context, the lesion was suggestive of metastasis, but primary lung cancer could not be ruled out (due to the patient’s history of smoking). As a result, trisegmentectomy of the left upper lobe was decided upon instead of wedge resection, for diagnosis and treatment of the lesion.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful, with a medical discharge on the fourth day following trisegmentectomy. Pathological findings concluded to a primary lung carcinoma without lymph node invasion.
Conclusion: Complete and precise segmentectomy can be performed safely by means of the da Vinci™ robotic system, without using a utility thoracotomy. This diagnostic and therapeutic option must be considered in case of small pulmonary lesions occurring during cancer surveillance.
Full endoscopic robotic assisted upper left lung lobectomy for a suspicious lesion
Objective:
To present a complete endoscopic approach for thoracic resection using the Da Vinci™ robotic device (Ninan M, MR Dylewski. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2).
Methods:
A 62-year-old man was a former smoker with an accumulated dose of 70 packs of cigarettes a year and had a history of rheumatic polyarthritis under immunotherapy. He presented a deterioration of his overall health condition and a CT-scan was performed. The CT-scan showed a ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the left upper lobe. Functional respiratory tests were the following: FEV1 51% and DLCO 65%, and the patient completed 4 floors at the stair-climbing test. An upper left lobectomy using a Da Vinci™ robotic system was performed with a high level of safety.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a benign granuloma. Our patient has not shown any incidence during a one-month follow-up and his physician reintroduced his immunosuppressive treatment.
Conclusion: Complete and precise lobectomy can be performed safely by means of the Da Vinci™ robotic system with low morbidity.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1275 views
18 likes
0 comments
07:10
Full endoscopic robotic assisted upper left lung lobectomy for a suspicious lesion
Objective:
To present a complete endoscopic approach for thoracic resection using the Da Vinci™ robotic device (Ninan M, MR Dylewski. Total port-access robot-assisted pulmonary lobectomy without utility thoracotomy. Eur J Cardiothorac Surg 2010;38:231-2).
Methods:
A 62-year-old man was a former smoker with an accumulated dose of 70 packs of cigarettes a year and had a history of rheumatic polyarthritis under immunotherapy. He presented a deterioration of his overall health condition and a CT-scan was performed. The CT-scan showed a ground-glass opacity (GGO) in the left upper lobe. Functional respiratory tests were the following: FEV1 51% and DLCO 65%, and the patient completed 4 floors at the stair-climbing test. An upper left lobectomy using a Da Vinci™ robotic system was performed with a high level of safety.
Results: The postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological findings confirmed the diagnosis of a benign granuloma. Our patient has not shown any incidence during a one-month follow-up and his physician reintroduced his immunosuppressive treatment.
Conclusion: Complete and precise lobectomy can be performed safely by means of the Da Vinci™ robotic system with low morbidity.
Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS): right lower lobectomy with complete node clearance using an anterior approach
This video presents the management of a suspicious peripheral pulmonary tumor located in the right lower lobe (RLL), classified cT3N0M0 after preoperative staging (positive PET-scan with positive pathology). This case has been presented in a thoracic oncology multidisciplinary meeting, which validated a first-line surgical treatment by lobectomy and radical mediastinal lymph node resection.
The video demonstrates the videothoracoscopic anterior approach, initially described by McKenna and modified by Hansen. This anterior approach seems easier to reproduce and generally simpler than a videothoracoscopic posterior approach for many reasons: no dissection of the fissure, which is an unpredictable technique depending on the patient, use of a 5cm pleurotomy allowing for an easy access for curved instruments, and a very quick conversion, should it be needed; this last safety measure is fundamental.
Videothoracoscopic surgery is poorly developed in France although it is becoming a standard procedure in some major reference centers in thoracic surgery. This procedure offers many advantages: early rehabilitation linked to lesser postoperative pain, a rapid return to regular daily activities, an earlier onset for any potential adjuvant therapy.
It is important to be familiar with the anterior approach because it presents very different anatomical features as compared with the conventional posterior approach by thoracotomy. The emergence of reference centers should make training for this complex surgery possible, and it will probably become a therapeutic standard for cancer treatment, along with other specialities.
This video shows many tips to deal with fissure and pulmonary artery.
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
3823 views
27 likes
0 comments
10:24
Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS): right lower lobectomy with complete node clearance using an anterior approach
This video presents the management of a suspicious peripheral pulmonary tumor located in the right lower lobe (RLL), classified cT3N0M0 after preoperative staging (positive PET-scan with positive pathology). This case has been presented in a thoracic oncology multidisciplinary meeting, which validated a first-line surgical treatment by lobectomy and radical mediastinal lymph node resection.
The video demonstrates the videothoracoscopic anterior approach, initially described by McKenna and modified by Hansen. This anterior approach seems easier to reproduce and generally simpler than a videothoracoscopic posterior approach for many reasons: no dissection of the fissure, which is an unpredictable technique depending on the patient, use of a 5cm pleurotomy allowing for an easy access for curved instruments, and a very quick conversion, should it be needed; this last safety measure is fundamental.
Videothoracoscopic surgery is poorly developed in France although it is becoming a standard procedure in some major reference centers in thoracic surgery. This procedure offers many advantages: early rehabilitation linked to lesser postoperative pain, a rapid return to regular daily activities, an earlier onset for any potential adjuvant therapy.
It is important to be familiar with the anterior approach because it presents very different anatomical features as compared with the conventional posterior approach by thoracotomy. The emergence of reference centers should make training for this complex surgery possible, and it will probably become a therapeutic standard for cancer treatment, along with other specialities.
This video shows many tips to deal with fissure and pulmonary artery.