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Valerie PODELSKI

MD
Private practice
Strasbourg, France
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Laparoscopic management of a perforated ulcer at the gastrojejunal anastomosis after LGBP
Anastomotic ulcers (also known as ‘‘marginal’’ ulcers) develop as a complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for treatment of obesity, they are almost always found to arise in the jejunal Roux limb directly abutting the gastrojejunal anastomosis. Marginal ulcers have been reported in 1–16% of patients after gastric bypass surgery, developing in both the early and late postoperative periods.
Recommended references:
1. Sapala JA, Wood MH, Sapala MA, Flake TM Jr. Marginal ulcer after gastric bypass: a prospective 3-year study of 173 patients. Obes Surg 1998;8:505–516.
2. Csendes A, Burgos AM, Altuve J, Bonacic S. Incidence of marginal ulcer 1 month and 1 to 2 years after gastric bypass: a prospective consecutive endoscopic evaluation of 442 patients with morbid obesity. Obes Surg 2009;19:135–138.
3. Patel RA, Brolin RE, Gandhi A. Revisional operations for marginal ulcer after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Surg Obes Relat Dis 2009;5:317–322.
4. St. Jean MR, Dunkle-Blatter SE, Petrick AT. Laparoscopic management of perforated marginal ulcer after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Surg Obes Relat Dis 2006;2:668.
5. Goitein D. Late perforation of the jejuno-jejunal anastomosis after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Obes Surg 2005;13(6):880–882.
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
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05:30
Laparoscopic management of a perforated ulcer at the gastrojejunal anastomosis after LGBP
Anastomotic ulcers (also known as ‘‘marginal’’ ulcers) develop as a complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for treatment of obesity, they are almost always found to arise in the jejunal Roux limb directly abutting the gastrojejunal anastomosis. Marginal ulcers have been reported in 1–16% of patients after gastric bypass surgery, developing in both the early and late postoperative periods.
Recommended references:
1. Sapala JA, Wood MH, Sapala MA, Flake TM Jr. Marginal ulcer after gastric bypass: a prospective 3-year study of 173 patients. Obes Surg 1998;8:505–516.
2. Csendes A, Burgos AM, Altuve J, Bonacic S. Incidence of marginal ulcer 1 month and 1 to 2 years after gastric bypass: a prospective consecutive endoscopic evaluation of 442 patients with morbid obesity. Obes Surg 2009;19:135–138.
3. Patel RA, Brolin RE, Gandhi A. Revisional operations for marginal ulcer after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Surg Obes Relat Dis 2009;5:317–322.
4. St. Jean MR, Dunkle-Blatter SE, Petrick AT. Laparoscopic management of perforated marginal ulcer after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Surg Obes Relat Dis 2006;2:668.
5. Goitein D. Late perforation of the jejuno-jejunal anastomosis after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Obes Surg 2005;13(6):880–882.