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Giovanni DAPRI

Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Saint-Pierre
Brussels, Belgium
MD, PhD, FACS, FASMBS, Hon FPALES, Hon SPCMIN, Hon BSS, Hon CBCD, Hon CBC
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Three-trocar laparoscopic right ileocolectomy for advanced small bowel neuroendocrine tumor
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) was shown to offer advantages in general and oncologic surgery (1). Over the last decade, reduced port laparoscopy (RPL) has been introduced to reduce the risks related to ports and abdominal wall trauma, with enhanced cosmetic outcomes (2). In this video, the authors report the case of a 59-year-old man with a small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, and who underwent a three-trocar right ileocolectomy.
Video: Preoperative work-up, including endoscopic ultrasound, octreoscan, PET-scan, and FDG PET-CT, showed a 15mm small bowel tumor with mesenteric and transverse mesocolic extension, until the muscularis propria of the third portion of the duodenum. The biopsy revealed a low-grade well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. The procedure was performed using three abdominal trocars: a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank (Figure 1). Abdominal cavity exploration demonstrated the presence of a tumor located in the mesentery of the last small bowel loop, with consequent bowel retraction, dislocation of the caecum and appendix, located under the right lobe of the liver, and tumoral extension into the proximal transverse mesocolon. After mobilization of the right colon from laterally to medially, the second and third duodenal segments were exposed, showing tumor extension towards the anterior duodenal wall of these segments. After encircling the anterior aspect of the duodenal wall with a piece of cotton tape (Figure 2), an endoscopic linear stapler was inserted through the umbilical trocar under the visual guidance of a 5mm scope in the left flank (Figure 3a), and it was fired (Figure 3b). The specimen was removed through a suprapubic access. Perioperative frozen section biopsy showed a free duodenal margin, and the procedure was subsequently completed with an ileocolic anastomosis, performed in a side-to-side handsewn intracorporeal fashion. At the end, the mesocolic defect was closed.

Results: Operative time was 4 hours. No added trocars were necessary. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. Pathological findings showed a grade I well-differentiated small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, with lymphovascular emboli and perinervous infiltration (1/20 metastatic nodes, free margins, stage: pT3N1 (8 UICC edition). A follow-up under somatostatin therapy was put forward.

Conclusions: RPL is a feasible option when performing advanced oncological surgery. Patients benefit from all MIS advantages, including reduced trocar complications and enhanced cosmetic outcomes.
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
6415 views
112 likes
0 comments
11:10
Three-trocar laparoscopic right ileocolectomy for advanced small bowel neuroendocrine tumor
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) was shown to offer advantages in general and oncologic surgery (1). Over the last decade, reduced port laparoscopy (RPL) has been introduced to reduce the risks related to ports and abdominal wall trauma, with enhanced cosmetic outcomes (2). In this video, the authors report the case of a 59-year-old man with a small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, and who underwent a three-trocar right ileocolectomy.
Video: Preoperative work-up, including endoscopic ultrasound, octreoscan, PET-scan, and FDG PET-CT, showed a 15mm small bowel tumor with mesenteric and transverse mesocolic extension, until the muscularis propria of the third portion of the duodenum. The biopsy revealed a low-grade well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor. The procedure was performed using three abdominal trocars: a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank (Figure 1). Abdominal cavity exploration demonstrated the presence of a tumor located in the mesentery of the last small bowel loop, with consequent bowel retraction, dislocation of the caecum and appendix, located under the right lobe of the liver, and tumoral extension into the proximal transverse mesocolon. After mobilization of the right colon from laterally to medially, the second and third duodenal segments were exposed, showing tumor extension towards the anterior duodenal wall of these segments. After encircling the anterior aspect of the duodenal wall with a piece of cotton tape (Figure 2), an endoscopic linear stapler was inserted through the umbilical trocar under the visual guidance of a 5mm scope in the left flank (Figure 3a), and it was fired (Figure 3b). The specimen was removed through a suprapubic access. Perioperative frozen section biopsy showed a free duodenal margin, and the procedure was subsequently completed with an ileocolic anastomosis, performed in a side-to-side handsewn intracorporeal fashion. At the end, the mesocolic defect was closed.

Results: Operative time was 4 hours. No added trocars were necessary. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4. Pathological findings showed a grade I well-differentiated small bowel neuroendocrine tumor, with lymphovascular emboli and perinervous infiltration (1/20 metastatic nodes, free margins, stage: pT3N1 (8 UICC edition). A follow-up under somatostatin therapy was put forward.

Conclusions: RPL is a feasible option when performing advanced oncological surgery. Patients benefit from all MIS advantages, including reduced trocar complications and enhanced cosmetic outcomes.
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1032 views
199 likes
0 comments
05:53
Transanal minimally invasive full-thickness middle rectum polyp resection with the patient in a prone position
Background: Nowadays, rectal preservation has gained popularity when it comes to the management of degenerated rectal polyps or early rectal cancer (1, 2). Tis/T1 rectal lesions can be safely treated without chemoradiation (3). Treatment via transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) offers more advantages than endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) (4). The authors report the case of a 60-year-old woman who underwent a TAMIS procedure for a large polyp located anteriorly in the middle rectum, which was 7cm away from the pectineal line and staged as uTisN0M0 preoperatively.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone position with a split-leg kneeling position. A reusable transanal D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was introduced into the anus together with DAPRI monocurved instruments (Figure 1). The polyp was put in evidence (Figure 2) and resection margins were defined circumferentially using the monocurved coagulating hook. A full-thickness resection was performed with a complete removal of the rectal serosa and exposure of the peritoneal cavity, due to the anatomical polyp positioning (Figure 3). The rectal opening was subsequently closed using two converging full-thickness running sutures using 3/0 V-loc™ sutures (Figure 4a). The two sutures were started laterally and joined together medially (Figure 4b).
Results: Total operative time was 60 minutes whereas suturing time was 35 minutes. There was no perioperative bleeding. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 2 days. The pathological report showed a tubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and clear margins.
Conclusions: In the presence of degenerated rectal polyps, full-thickness TAMIS is oncologically safe and feasible. The final rectal flap can be safely closed by means of laparoscopic endoluminal sutures.
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1273 views
233 likes
0 comments
07:49
Double transanal laparoscopic resection of large anal canal and low rectum polyps
Background: Rectal polyps, and especially small and medium-sized lesions are removed via conventional endoscopy. Large rectal polyps can be approached using endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR) and endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD). In more recent years, laparoscopic surgery underwent an evolution and a new application for endoluminal resection called transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) was introduced. The authors report the case of a 79-year-old man presenting with two large polyps of the anal canal (uTisN0) and low rectum (uTis vs T1N0), which were removed through TAMIS.
Video: The patient was placed in a prone, jackknife position with legs apart. The reusable transanal D-Port was introduced into the anus. Exploration of the cavity showed the presence of a large polyp involving the entire length of the anal canal and part of the lower third of the rectum and a second large polyp located 1cm above in the lower third of the rectum. The anal canal polyp was removed with the preservation of the muscular layer. The lower third rectal polyp was removed by resecting the full-thickness of the rectal wall. During the entire procedure, the surgeon worked under satisfactory ergonomics. The polyps were removed through the D-Port. The mucosal and submucosal flaps for anal canal resection, as well as the entire rectal wall opening for low rectal resection, were closed by means of two converging absorbable sutures.
Results: Operative time was 78 minutes for the anal canal polyp and 53 minutes for the low rectum polyp. Perioperative bleeding was 10cc. The postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged after 1 day. The pathological report for both polyps showed a tubulovillous adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins (stage: pTis, 8 UICC edition).
Conclusions: TAMIS for double and large polyps located in the anal canal and low rectum offers advantages, such as excellent field exposure, safe en bloc polypectomy, and final endoluminal defect closure.
Transanal minimally invasive surgical anal canal polyp resection
Background: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been known for a long time. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) started to be popularized and it can be used in front of difficult cases for ESD.

Video: A 36-year-old woman underwent a TAMIS resection, after unsuccessful ESD, for a 2cm polyp located anteriorly in the anal canal, just beside the pectineal line. Preoperative work-up showed a uT1m versus T1sm N0 M0 lesion. The patient was placed in a prone position with a split leg kneeling position. The procedure was performed with a new reusable transanal platform, a monocurved coagulating hook, and a grasping forceps. The mucosal flap was closed using two absorbable running sutures, a monocurved needle holder, and a grasping forceps.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No perioperative complications were noted, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. Pathological findings showed a 2 by 1.3 by 0.5cm villotubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins.

Conclusions: TAMIS anal canal polyp resection allows for a meticulous dissection under a magnified exposure of the operative field, with a final mucosal flap closure in adequate ergonomic conditions.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
2215 views
103 likes
0 comments
05:13
Transanal minimally invasive surgical anal canal polyp resection
Background: Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) has been known for a long time. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery (TAMIS) started to be popularized and it can be used in front of difficult cases for ESD.

Video: A 36-year-old woman underwent a TAMIS resection, after unsuccessful ESD, for a 2cm polyp located anteriorly in the anal canal, just beside the pectineal line. Preoperative work-up showed a uT1m versus T1sm N0 M0 lesion. The patient was placed in a prone position with a split leg kneeling position. The procedure was performed with a new reusable transanal platform, a monocurved coagulating hook, and a grasping forceps. The mucosal flap was closed using two absorbable running sutures, a monocurved needle holder, and a grasping forceps.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No perioperative complications were noted, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. Pathological findings showed a 2 by 1.3 by 0.5cm villotubular adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and free margins.

Conclusions: TAMIS anal canal polyp resection allows for a meticulous dissection under a magnified exposure of the operative field, with a final mucosal flap closure in adequate ergonomic conditions.
The 3 approaches to splenic flexure mobilization
Background: The mobilization of the splenic flexure during laparoscopic colorectal surgery can be a challenge, especially in anatomically difficult patients. In this video, the inframesocolic, the supramesocolic, and lateral-to-medial approaches are demonstrated.

Video: The first part of the video shows the inframesocolic approach where the opening of the transverse mesocolon, above the pancreatic body and tail, allows access to the lesser sac and the exposure of the spleen. The second part of the video shows the supramesocolic approach where reaching Gerota’s fascia allows the flexure to be taken down. The third part of the video shows the lateral-to-medial approach where opening the lesser sac allows the flexure to be mobilized.

Results: All three approaches are laparoscopically feasible and safe. The goal remains similar, that is to avoid anastomotic tension. The operative time for this step, during the entire colorectal procedure, is influenced by the patient’s characteristics (previous surgery, high splenic flexure, short mesentery, etc.) and obviously, by the surgeon’s learning curve.

Conclusions: The choice between the three approaches depends on the patient’s characteristics and on the surgeon’s habits.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
4974 views
357 likes
0 comments
11:51
The 3 approaches to splenic flexure mobilization
Background: The mobilization of the splenic flexure during laparoscopic colorectal surgery can be a challenge, especially in anatomically difficult patients. In this video, the inframesocolic, the supramesocolic, and lateral-to-medial approaches are demonstrated.

Video: The first part of the video shows the inframesocolic approach where the opening of the transverse mesocolon, above the pancreatic body and tail, allows access to the lesser sac and the exposure of the spleen. The second part of the video shows the supramesocolic approach where reaching Gerota’s fascia allows the flexure to be taken down. The third part of the video shows the lateral-to-medial approach where opening the lesser sac allows the flexure to be mobilized.

Results: All three approaches are laparoscopically feasible and safe. The goal remains similar, that is to avoid anastomotic tension. The operative time for this step, during the entire colorectal procedure, is influenced by the patient’s characteristics (previous surgery, high splenic flexure, short mesentery, etc.) and obviously, by the surgeon’s learning curve.

Conclusions: The choice between the three approaches depends on the patient’s characteristics and on the surgeon’s habits.
Reduced port laparoscopic pyloroduodenectomy with handsewn Roux-en-Y reconstruction
Background: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) is an evolution of conventional laparoscopic surgery, allowing for enhanced cosmetic outcomes, in addition to a reduced abdominal wall trauma. Tips and tricks are required to complete a procedure using a RPLS.

Video: This video shows a 55-year-old lady who underwent a laparoscopic pyloro-duodenectomy for a duodenal bulb lesion increased in size at endoscopic follow-up. Three trocars were used (a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, a 5mm one in the left flank). The exposure of the operative field was enhanced thanks to a temporary percutaneous suture placed into the hepatic round ligament. Perioperative gastroscopy allowed for an adequate resection without too much distance from the margins, and preservation of the entire gastric antrum. The reconstruction was performed through a handsewn end-to-end gastrojejunostomy, with a 50cm alimentary limb, and a semi-mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy. Finally, a gastroscopy was used to test the gastrojejunostomy.

Results: Total operative time was 190 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings demonstrated a Brunner’s gland hamartoma, with safe distance from the margins.

Conclusions: RPLS is a step forward of conventional laparoscopy. Perioperative gastroscopy is essential to perform safe upper GI resections. br>
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
819 views
25 likes
0 comments
09:01
Reduced port laparoscopic pyloroduodenectomy with handsewn Roux-en-Y reconstruction
Background: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) is an evolution of conventional laparoscopic surgery, allowing for enhanced cosmetic outcomes, in addition to a reduced abdominal wall trauma. Tips and tricks are required to complete a procedure using a RPLS.

Video: This video shows a 55-year-old lady who underwent a laparoscopic pyloro-duodenectomy for a duodenal bulb lesion increased in size at endoscopic follow-up. Three trocars were used (a 12mm one in the umbilicus, a 5mm one in the right flank, a 5mm one in the left flank). The exposure of the operative field was enhanced thanks to a temporary percutaneous suture placed into the hepatic round ligament. Perioperative gastroscopy allowed for an adequate resection without too much distance from the margins, and preservation of the entire gastric antrum. The reconstruction was performed through a handsewn end-to-end gastrojejunostomy, with a 50cm alimentary limb, and a semi-mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy. Finally, a gastroscopy was used to test the gastrojejunostomy.

Results: Total operative time was 190 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. Postoperative course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7. Pathological findings demonstrated a Brunner’s gland hamartoma, with safe distance from the margins.

Conclusions: RPLS is a step forward of conventional laparoscopy. Perioperative gastroscopy is essential to perform safe upper GI resections. br>
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
3008 views
235 likes
1 comment
10:22
Completely intracorporeal handsewn laparoscopic anastomoses during Whipple procedure
Background: Since 1935, the Whipple procedure was described, using conventional open surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive surgery (MIS), it was reported to be feasible also using the latest technology. In this video, the authors demonstrate a full laparoscopic Whipple procedure, performing the three anastomoses using an intracorporeal handsewn method.

Video: A 70-year-old man presenting with an adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, infiltrating the pancreatic parenchyma, underwent a laparoscop ic Whipple procedure. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N1M0 tumor.

Results: Total operative time was 8 hours 20minutes; time for the dissection was 6 hours 20 minutes; time for specimen extraction was 20 minutes, and time for the three laparoscopic intracorporeal handsewn anastomoses was 1 hour 40 minutes. Operative bleeding was 350cc. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 9. Pathological findings confirmed a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma of the ampulla of Vater, with perinervous infiltration and lymphovascular emboli, free margins, 2 metastatic lymph nodes on 23 isolated; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4N1.

Conclusions: The laparoscopic Whipple procedure remains an advanced procedure to be performed laparoscopically and/or using open surgery. All the advantages of MIS such as reduced abdominal trauma, less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay, improved patient’s comfort, and enhanced cosmesis are offered using laparoscopy.
Suprapubic single-incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection with hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: The authors report the case of a 30-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of diverticulitis due to segmental diverticulosis of the splenic flexure. The patient was scheduled for a suprapubic single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection.

Video: A right suprapubic incision was performed and allowed for the introduction of three abdominal trocars (11mm, and two 6mm ones). DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were used, in addition to a 10mm, 30-degree regular length scope. The mobilization of the left mesocolon as well as of the transverse mesocolon was performed. After having completely freed the splenic flexure from its attachments, the transverse colon and the left colon were divided using an articulating linear stapler, introduced into the abdomen under a 5mm, 30-degree long scope. An intracorporeal end-to-end transverse sigmoid anastomosis was performed using two converging running sutures. The mesocolic defect was closed. The specimen was removed through a single access and final scar appeared to be 4cm.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 165 minutes and time to perform the anastomosis was 60 minutes. Operative bleeding was 10cc. The patient was discharged after 4 days, and at visit consultations, the symptoms were resolved.

Conclusion: Single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection can be safely performed using a suprapubic access, which enhances cosmetic outcomes, in addition to the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. A laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory and can be performed using a hand-sewn method.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1700 views
92 likes
0 comments
07:12
Suprapubic single-incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection with hand-sewn intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: The authors report the case of a 30-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of diverticulitis due to segmental diverticulosis of the splenic flexure. The patient was scheduled for a suprapubic single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection.

Video: A right suprapubic incision was performed and allowed for the introduction of three abdominal trocars (11mm, and two 6mm ones). DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were used, in addition to a 10mm, 30-degree regular length scope. The mobilization of the left mesocolon as well as of the transverse mesocolon was performed. After having completely freed the splenic flexure from its attachments, the transverse colon and the left colon were divided using an articulating linear stapler, introduced into the abdomen under a 5mm, 30-degree long scope. An intracorporeal end-to-end transverse sigmoid anastomosis was performed using two converging running sutures. The mesocolic defect was closed. The specimen was removed through a single access and final scar appeared to be 4cm.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 165 minutes and time to perform the anastomosis was 60 minutes. Operative bleeding was 10cc. The patient was discharged after 4 days, and at visit consultations, the symptoms were resolved.

Conclusion: Single incision laparoscopic splenic flexure resection can be safely performed using a suprapubic access, which enhances cosmetic outcomes, in addition to the advantages of minimally invasive surgery. A laparoscopic intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory and can be performed using a hand-sewn method.
Pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula
Background: Rectovaginal fistula is an abnormal connection between the rectum and the vagina, with leakage of rectal contents through the vagina. Different surgeries have been attempted such as direct repair, plug placement, advancement flap, muscle interposition, colostomy, proctectomy or delayed pull-through colo-anal anastomosis. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery has been described amongst the surgical options.

Video: The authors present a pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula in a 74-year-old lady, submitted 3 weeks before to a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum with ‘en bloc’ hysterectomy for rectal adenocarcinoma (pT4aN0M0). A protective ileostomy was performed at the time of rectal surgery, and the postoperative course was uneventful. After having positioned the patient in a gynecologic position, a new reusable transanal platform according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was adopted. The exploration of the lower rectum put in evidence a 2cm rectovaginal fistula, located at a 3 o’clock position and at a 12cm distance from the anal margin. Absorbable figure-of-8 sutures using Vicryl 2/0 were performed to close the defect. Thanks to the curves of the instruments, the surgeon worked under ergonomic positions, without clashing of the instruments’ tips and any conflict of the surgeon’s hands. At the end of the procedure, injection of methylene blue through the vagina did not show any passage of the product into the lower rectum.

Results: The operative time was 120 minutes and intraoperative bleeding was insignificant. The postoperative course was uneventful, and patient discharge was allowed after 6 days. Due to the reusable nature of all the material implemented, no supplementary cost was necessary. The gastrograffin enema after 2 months showed a complete healing of the fistula. As a result, the protective ileostomy was closed.
Conclusion: Rectovaginal fistula can be repaired through a pure transanal laparoscopy, which prevents complicated and demolition surgeries usually performed through the abdomen.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1413 views
96 likes
0 comments
04:58
Pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula
Background: Rectovaginal fistula is an abnormal connection between the rectum and the vagina, with leakage of rectal contents through the vagina. Different surgeries have been attempted such as direct repair, plug placement, advancement flap, muscle interposition, colostomy, proctectomy or delayed pull-through colo-anal anastomosis. Recently, transanal minimally invasive surgery has been described amongst the surgical options.

Video: The authors present a pure transanal laparoscopic repair of early rectovaginal fistula in a 74-year-old lady, submitted 3 weeks before to a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum with ‘en bloc’ hysterectomy for rectal adenocarcinoma (pT4aN0M0). A protective ileostomy was performed at the time of rectal surgery, and the postoperative course was uneventful. After having positioned the patient in a gynecologic position, a new reusable transanal platform according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) was adopted. The exploration of the lower rectum put in evidence a 2cm rectovaginal fistula, located at a 3 o’clock position and at a 12cm distance from the anal margin. Absorbable figure-of-8 sutures using Vicryl 2/0 were performed to close the defect. Thanks to the curves of the instruments, the surgeon worked under ergonomic positions, without clashing of the instruments’ tips and any conflict of the surgeon’s hands. At the end of the procedure, injection of methylene blue through the vagina did not show any passage of the product into the lower rectum.

Results: The operative time was 120 minutes and intraoperative bleeding was insignificant. The postoperative course was uneventful, and patient discharge was allowed after 6 days. Due to the reusable nature of all the material implemented, no supplementary cost was necessary. The gastrograffin enema after 2 months showed a complete healing of the fistula. As a result, the protective ileostomy was closed.
Conclusion: Rectovaginal fistula can be repaired through a pure transanal laparoscopy, which prevents complicated and demolition surgeries usually performed through the abdomen.
Transumbilical single-access laparoscopic subxiphoidal incisional hernia repair
Background: In this video, the authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who consulted for a subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery. A transumbilical single access laparoscopic repair was proposed.

Video: The umbilical scar was incised and, after having placed a fascial umbilical purse-string suture, an 11mm reusable trocar was introduced. DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were introduced. The subxiphoidal hernia was put in evidence. The fatty tissue covering the defect was freed and the hernia defect was measured to be 8cm cranio-caudally and 6cm latero-laterally. A dual face mesh of 15 and 14cm (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical, Saint-Etienne, France) was chosen and introduced into the cavity through the 11mm trocar. The mesh was fixed against the abdominal wall using absorbable tacks (Sorbafix, Bard Davol Inc., Warwick, RI, US), and against the pericardial sheet using a polypropylene suture, in order to prevent any potential cardiac tamponade.

Results: The final umbilical scar was 15mm. Operative time was 65 minutes, and operative bleeding was insignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. At visit consultations, no recurrence was evidenced.

Conclusion: Subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery can be treated successfully using a transumbilical single access laparoscopy.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1532 views
132 likes
0 comments
06:30
Transumbilical single-access laparoscopic subxiphoidal incisional hernia repair
Background: In this video, the authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who consulted for a subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery. A transumbilical single access laparoscopic repair was proposed.

Video: The umbilical scar was incised and, after having placed a fascial umbilical purse-string suture, an 11mm reusable trocar was introduced. DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were introduced. The subxiphoidal hernia was put in evidence. The fatty tissue covering the defect was freed and the hernia defect was measured to be 8cm cranio-caudally and 6cm latero-laterally. A dual face mesh of 15 and 14cm (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical, Saint-Etienne, France) was chosen and introduced into the cavity through the 11mm trocar. The mesh was fixed against the abdominal wall using absorbable tacks (Sorbafix, Bard Davol Inc., Warwick, RI, US), and against the pericardial sheet using a polypropylene suture, in order to prevent any potential cardiac tamponade.

Results: The final umbilical scar was 15mm. Operative time was 65 minutes, and operative bleeding was insignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. At visit consultations, no recurrence was evidenced.

Conclusion: Subxiphoidal incisional hernia after open cardiac surgery can be treated successfully using a transumbilical single access laparoscopy.
Laparoscopic prosthetic parastomal and perineal hernias repair after abdominoperineal resection
Background: In this video, the authors report the case of a 74-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of intestinal occlusions following an abdomino-perineal resection for rectal adenocarcinoma (pT2N0M0), performed 6 years earlier. Abdomino-pelvic CT-scan showed a parastomal hernia with migrated small bowel loops and a perineal hernia with transposition of the caecum and bowel loops into the pelvis. Preoperative work-up was negative for tumor recurrence, hence a laparoscopic treatment using a double dual face prosthesis was proposed.

Video: Three trocars were placed into the abdomen. After adhesiolysis and removal of the viscera herniated into the hernia, the parastomal defect was exposed and measured intracorporeally 6cm (cranio-caudally) and 4cm (latero-laterally). An intracorporeal suture was used to close the defect, and a dual face prosthesis of 15cm in length and 10cm in width (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical, Saint-Etienne, France) was fixed by means of absorbable tacks (Sorbafix, Bard Davol Inc., Warwick, RI, US), according to the Sugarbaker technique. Successively, the pelvis was freed from adhesions, and the superior pelvic opening appeared to be 8cm (antero-posteriorly) and 7cm (latero-laterally). A dual face circular prosthesis of 10cm (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical) was fixed using two running sutures around the superior pelvic opening.

Results: Operative time was 72 minutes for parastomal hernia and 95 minutes for perineal hernia. Operative bleeding was unsignificant. The patient was discharged after 3 days, and at visit consultations, she did not present with any recurrence.

Conclusion: Prosthetic parastomal and perineal hernias repair can be performed simultaneously using laparoscopy with the same port positioning, adding the advantages of minimally invasive surgery and avoiding a large laparotomy.
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1229 views
118 likes
0 comments
07:20
Laparoscopic prosthetic parastomal and perineal hernias repair after abdominoperineal resection
Background: In this video, the authors report the case of a 74-year-old woman who consulted for episodes of intestinal occlusions following an abdomino-perineal resection for rectal adenocarcinoma (pT2N0M0), performed 6 years earlier. Abdomino-pelvic CT-scan showed a parastomal hernia with migrated small bowel loops and a perineal hernia with transposition of the caecum and bowel loops into the pelvis. Preoperative work-up was negative for tumor recurrence, hence a laparoscopic treatment using a double dual face prosthesis was proposed.

Video: Three trocars were placed into the abdomen. After adhesiolysis and removal of the viscera herniated into the hernia, the parastomal defect was exposed and measured intracorporeally 6cm (cranio-caudally) and 4cm (latero-laterally). An intracorporeal suture was used to close the defect, and a dual face prosthesis of 15cm in length and 10cm in width (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical, Saint-Etienne, France) was fixed by means of absorbable tacks (Sorbafix, Bard Davol Inc., Warwick, RI, US), according to the Sugarbaker technique. Successively, the pelvis was freed from adhesions, and the superior pelvic opening appeared to be 8cm (antero-posteriorly) and 7cm (latero-laterally). A dual face circular prosthesis of 10cm (Surgimesh XB, Aspide Medical) was fixed using two running sutures around the superior pelvic opening.

Results: Operative time was 72 minutes for parastomal hernia and 95 minutes for perineal hernia. Operative bleeding was unsignificant. The patient was discharged after 3 days, and at visit consultations, she did not present with any recurrence.

Conclusion: Prosthetic parastomal and perineal hernias repair can be performed simultaneously using laparoscopy with the same port positioning, adding the advantages of minimally invasive surgery and avoiding a large laparotomy.
Single incision laparoscopic peritoneal hole repair during right TEP procedure
Background: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair offers various advantages both to the patient and the surgeon. Transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repairs represent the two laparoscopic options. A personal technique of single incision laparoscopic TEP has already been published on WebSurg (Link: http://www.websurg.com/MEDIA/?noheader=1&doi=vd01en4054).
Video: This video demonstrates the single incision laparoscopic treatment of a peritoneal hole, which occurred accidentally during a right TEP procedure.
Results: The TEP procedure lasted 41 minutes and the peritoneal repair 8 minutes. The final umbilical scar length was 10mm and the patient was discharged within 24 hours.
Conclusions: Peroperative complications can occur during single incision laparoscopy, as well as during conventional laparoscopy and open surgery. The procedure can be performed without conversion or additional trocars, depending on the complications which occurred.
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2335 views
148 likes
0 comments
04:03
Single incision laparoscopic peritoneal hole repair during right TEP procedure
Background: Laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair offers various advantages both to the patient and the surgeon. Transabdominal preperitoneal (TAPP) and total extraperitoneal (TEP) repairs represent the two laparoscopic options. A personal technique of single incision laparoscopic TEP has already been published on WebSurg (Link: http://www.websurg.com/MEDIA/?noheader=1&doi=vd01en4054).
Video: This video demonstrates the single incision laparoscopic treatment of a peritoneal hole, which occurred accidentally during a right TEP procedure.
Results: The TEP procedure lasted 41 minutes and the peritoneal repair 8 minutes. The final umbilical scar length was 10mm and the patient was discharged within 24 hours.
Conclusions: Peroperative complications can occur during single incision laparoscopy, as well as during conventional laparoscopy and open surgery. The procedure can be performed without conversion or additional trocars, depending on the complications which occurred.
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3148 views
97 likes
0 comments
11:03
Three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy with intracorporeal manual esophagojejunostomy
Background: Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) has proven to be oncologically feasible and safe. Over the last decade, a new philosophy of MIS reducing abdominal trauma and improving cosmetic results has been made popular. The authors report a three-trocar laparoscopic total gastrectomy combined with a D2 lymphadenectomy for smaller curvature gastric adenocarcinoma.
Video: A 52-year-old woman presenting with a non-differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma at the incisura angularis was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up showed a T3N+M0 tumor. After neoadjuvant chemotherapy, laparoscopy was scheduled. Three ports (5mm, 12mm, 5mm) were placed in the abdomen. Exposure of the operative field was improved with percutaneous sutures. En-bloc total gastrectomy and omentectomy were performed with a D2 lymphadenectomy, including the nodes of stations 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8a, 8p, 9, 10, 11p, 11d, and 12a. A completely manual end-to-side esophagojejunostomy, and a linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, with closure of both mesenteric and mesocolic defects. The specimen was retrieved through a suprapubic access.
Results: Operative time was 4 hours and 45 minutes (anastomosis: 30) and perioperative bleeding amounted to 100cc. The pathological report confirmed the presence of a non-differentiated adenocarcinoma, mucinous, G3, interesting the gastric wall completely, with 63 (4 positive) nodes removed; 7 edition UICC stage: pT4aN2aM0; keratine AE1/AE3 negative, HER2/neu and HER2/CEP17 non-amplified. During the postoperative follow-up, no recurrence was demonstrated at 12 months.
Conclusions: Reduced port laparoscopic surgery provides the same quality of oncologic surgery as conventional multiport laparoscopy. However, a superior cosmesis and a reduced abdominal trauma are offered.
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy plus 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Transumbilical single access laparoscopy (TSAL) has gained interest over the last decade. However, in bariatric surgery, it still remains difficult due to the fact that the umbilicus is not a landmark, and it is frequently localized too far from the operative field. In selected patients, it can be considered and offered.
Video: A 29-year-old morbidly obese woman with a BMI of 40 underwent TSAL sleeve gastrectomy. Two reusable ports and curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were placed in the umbilicus. The chosen method to perform sleeve gastrectomy was a medial-to-lateral approach (gastric division followed by greater curvature mobilization), and the resection of the gastric antrum. Gastric division was performed under the control of a long, rigid, 30-degree scope (Karl Storz). To expose the hiatal region and the angle of His, a 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz) was inserted underneath the xiphoid process and placed against the diaphragm below the left liver lobe. Some absorbable sutures between the staple lines were finally placed, and no drain was left into the abdominal cavity. The specimen was removed transumbilically, after joining the three used windows together at the umbilical aponeurosis.
Results: Laparoscopy took 94 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 30cc. Umbilical scar length was 25mm. No postoperative complications were noted and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
Conclusions: TSAL sleeve gastrectomy can be offered to selected obese patients. The use of reusable material and curved tools make it possible not to increase the cost of the procedure due to TSAL, and to establish intracorporeal and extracorporeal working triangulation.
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1809 views
62 likes
0 comments
08:13
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy plus 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Transumbilical single access laparoscopy (TSAL) has gained interest over the last decade. However, in bariatric surgery, it still remains difficult due to the fact that the umbilicus is not a landmark, and it is frequently localized too far from the operative field. In selected patients, it can be considered and offered.
Video: A 29-year-old morbidly obese woman with a BMI of 40 underwent TSAL sleeve gastrectomy. Two reusable ports and curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) were placed in the umbilicus. The chosen method to perform sleeve gastrectomy was a medial-to-lateral approach (gastric division followed by greater curvature mobilization), and the resection of the gastric antrum. Gastric division was performed under the control of a long, rigid, 30-degree scope (Karl Storz). To expose the hiatal region and the angle of His, a 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz) was inserted underneath the xiphoid process and placed against the diaphragm below the left liver lobe. Some absorbable sutures between the staple lines were finally placed, and no drain was left into the abdominal cavity. The specimen was removed transumbilically, after joining the three used windows together at the umbilical aponeurosis.
Results: Laparoscopy took 94 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 30cc. Umbilical scar length was 25mm. No postoperative complications were noted and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.
Conclusions: TSAL sleeve gastrectomy can be offered to selected obese patients. The use of reusable material and curved tools make it possible not to increase the cost of the procedure due to TSAL, and to establish intracorporeal and extracorporeal working triangulation.
Single incision laparoscopic non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia repair
Background: A diaphragmatic hernia is a quite uncommon disease, being congenital or post-traumatic. Its diagnosis is frequently incidental. The surgical treatment can be performed through the abdomen as well as through the chest. Laparoscopy and thoracoscopy offer a surgical benefit, because of reduced abdominal wall trauma and added advantages provided by minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy (TSIL), in addition to improved cosmetic results, can offer other advantages to MIS such as reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and improved patient comfort.
Video: The authors report the case of a 45-year-old man who consulted for a non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia, which was discovered incidentally, and which was treated using TSIL suture and mesh reinforcement.
Results: Laparoscopic time was 104 minutes and perioperative bleeding was insignificant. The final umbilical scar was 15mm. During the postoperative course, only 4 grams of paracetamol were used. The patient was discharged on the 1st postoperative day, after chest X-ray control. At consultation, the patient did not report the use of painkillers and, at 1, 6, and 12 months, the chest X-ray control was negative for recurrence.
Conclusions: Uncommon conditions, such as a lateral diaphragmatic hernia, can be approached using TSIL, because this technique adds an improved cosmetic result, a reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and an improved patient comfort.
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1053 views
32 likes
0 comments
07:14
Single incision laparoscopic non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia repair
Background: A diaphragmatic hernia is a quite uncommon disease, being congenital or post-traumatic. Its diagnosis is frequently incidental. The surgical treatment can be performed through the abdomen as well as through the chest. Laparoscopy and thoracoscopy offer a surgical benefit, because of reduced abdominal wall trauma and added advantages provided by minimally invasive surgery (MIS). Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy (TSIL), in addition to improved cosmetic results, can offer other advantages to MIS such as reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and improved patient comfort.
Video: The authors report the case of a 45-year-old man who consulted for a non-traumatic left lateral diaphragmatic hernia, which was discovered incidentally, and which was treated using TSIL suture and mesh reinforcement.
Results: Laparoscopic time was 104 minutes and perioperative bleeding was insignificant. The final umbilical scar was 15mm. During the postoperative course, only 4 grams of paracetamol were used. The patient was discharged on the 1st postoperative day, after chest X-ray control. At consultation, the patient did not report the use of painkillers and, at 1, 6, and 12 months, the chest X-ray control was negative for recurrence.
Conclusions: Uncommon conditions, such as a lateral diaphragmatic hernia, can be approached using TSIL, because this technique adds an improved cosmetic result, a reduced postoperative pain, a shorter hospital stay, and an improved patient comfort.
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) through single right iliac fossa (RIF) incision
Background: Single incision laparoscopy is worth of interest during up-to-down rectal resection because it allows to use the single site as the site of temporary ileostomy placement at the end of the procedure.
Video: This video shows an up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection in a 49-year-old woman presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma located 12cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor. The procedure was entirely performed with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), inserted in the right flank. The uterus and the peritoneal sheet covering the vagina were retrieved using percutaneous sutures. A circular mechanical colorectal anastomosis was performed and a final temporary ileostomy was placed at the site of the single access.
Results: The procedure duration was 297 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (20 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection allows to place the temporary ileostomy at the single incision site, offering oncological results comparable to conventional laparoscopy.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2360 views
110 likes
0 comments
09:22
Laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME) through single right iliac fossa (RIF) incision
Background: Single incision laparoscopy is worth of interest during up-to-down rectal resection because it allows to use the single site as the site of temporary ileostomy placement at the end of the procedure.
Video: This video shows an up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection in a 49-year-old woman presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma located 12cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor. The procedure was entirely performed with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), inserted in the right flank. The uterus and the peritoneal sheet covering the vagina were retrieved using percutaneous sutures. A circular mechanical colorectal anastomosis was performed and a final temporary ileostomy was placed at the site of the single access.
Results: The procedure duration was 297 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 5. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (20 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Up-to-down single incision laparoscopic rectal resection allows to place the temporary ileostomy at the single incision site, offering oncological results comparable to conventional laparoscopy.
Transanal circumferential mucosectomy for symptomatic benign rectal stenosis
Background: Transanal laparoscopy has been described for more than 30 years. In the presence of benign lesions, it gathers increasing interest, especially if such lesions are located in the low rectum or close to the anal margin.
Video: This video demonstrates the case of a 38-year-old man presented with a circumferential rectal stenosis due to a rectal ulcer. The patient underwent a transanal mucosectomy using laparoscopy, after a sequence of unsuccessful endoscopic dilatations. Preoperative work-up showed a circumferential benign stenosis, 2.5cm away from the anal margin. The procedure was entirely performed with a new reusable transanal platform made up by the DAPRI-Port and DAPRI curved instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). Once the 360-degree mucosectomy had been completed, the mucosal layer was repaired using separate absorbable sutures.
Results: The operative length was 163 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. The pathological report confirmed the benign nature of the lesion.
Conclusions: Although transanal laparoscopy has been documented for years, it gathers increasing interest and should be considered as the technique of choice for the treatment of benign rectal lesions, which can be difficult to treat using other methods.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1057 views
13 likes
0 comments
08:37
Transanal circumferential mucosectomy for symptomatic benign rectal stenosis
Background: Transanal laparoscopy has been described for more than 30 years. In the presence of benign lesions, it gathers increasing interest, especially if such lesions are located in the low rectum or close to the anal margin.
Video: This video demonstrates the case of a 38-year-old man presented with a circumferential rectal stenosis due to a rectal ulcer. The patient underwent a transanal mucosectomy using laparoscopy, after a sequence of unsuccessful endoscopic dilatations. Preoperative work-up showed a circumferential benign stenosis, 2.5cm away from the anal margin. The procedure was entirely performed with a new reusable transanal platform made up by the DAPRI-Port and DAPRI curved instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). Once the 360-degree mucosectomy had been completed, the mucosal layer was repaired using separate absorbable sutures.
Results: The operative length was 163 minutes, and peroperative bleeding was unsignificant. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. The pathological report confirmed the benign nature of the lesion.
Conclusions: Although transanal laparoscopy has been documented for years, it gathers increasing interest and should be considered as the technique of choice for the treatment of benign rectal lesions, which can be difficult to treat using other methods.
Laparoscopic repair of colorectal leak and fistula using a new transanal reusable platform
Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery has triggered much interest and investment in research over the last decade. This approach can be used not only to perform primary procedures (e.g., polypectomy, TME), but also to manage intraoperative complications such as leaks, bleedings, and late complications such as fistulas.
Video: The first part of the video shows the repair of an immediate colorectal leak using transanal laparoscopy, in a 50-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum. During anastomotic control, a posterior leak 4cm away from the anal margin was found. A new transanal reusable port, named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), along with DAPRI monocurved reusable instruments, was implemented. The second part of the video shows a persisting and symptomatic colorectal fistula, located posteriorly 11cm away from the anal margin, in a 65-year-old man who had undergone a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum 4 weeks earlier.
Results: Operative time was 60 and 45 minutes respectively. Patients were discharged after 5 and 2 days respectively. Controls at 2 months (before ileostomy closure) showed a complete healing of the defects.
Conclusions: Complications after anterior resection of the rectum, such as intraoperative leak and late colorectal fistula, can be treated using transanal laparoscopy. This new transanal platform offers surgeons the possibility to work in ergonomic positions without increasing the cost of the procedure thanks to the reusable nature of the material adopted.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1683 views
34 likes
0 comments
05:55
Laparoscopic repair of colorectal leak and fistula using a new transanal reusable platform
Background: Transanal minimally invasive surgery has triggered much interest and investment in research over the last decade. This approach can be used not only to perform primary procedures (e.g., polypectomy, TME), but also to manage intraoperative complications such as leaks, bleedings, and late complications such as fistulas.
Video: The first part of the video shows the repair of an immediate colorectal leak using transanal laparoscopy, in a 50-year-old woman who underwent a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum. During anastomotic control, a posterior leak 4cm away from the anal margin was found. A new transanal reusable port, named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany), along with DAPRI monocurved reusable instruments, was implemented. The second part of the video shows a persisting and symptomatic colorectal fistula, located posteriorly 11cm away from the anal margin, in a 65-year-old man who had undergone a laparoscopic anterior resection of the rectum 4 weeks earlier.
Results: Operative time was 60 and 45 minutes respectively. Patients were discharged after 5 and 2 days respectively. Controls at 2 months (before ileostomy closure) showed a complete healing of the defects.
Conclusions: Complications after anterior resection of the rectum, such as intraoperative leak and late colorectal fistula, can be treated using transanal laparoscopy. This new transanal platform offers surgeons the possibility to work in ergonomic positions without increasing the cost of the procedure thanks to the reusable nature of the material adopted.
Transanal laparoscopic TME with a new port assisted by single incision
Background: Rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) can be performed through the anus going up into the abdominal cavity. This approach has to be performed using a transanal device in order to create a retroperitoneum, allowing the surgeon to perform a TME similar to the one performed from the abdomen going down to the anus. A new reusable port named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) has been developed, and a new platform together with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope) has been created. The D-Port allows to maintain one of the rules of laparoscopy, which is the optical system in the middle of the two ancillary operative tools. In addition, the cost of the procedure is not increased, due to the reusable material.
Video: This video shows a down-to-up rectal resection assisted by single incision laparoscopy, in a 65-year old man presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma 4cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor, after radiochemotherapy. The procedure was performed transabdominally for the vascular dissection and transanally for the TME. The abdominal single site was then used for the placement of the temporary ileostomy.
Results: Total operative time was 301 minutes, and partial transanal laparoscopy was 145 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged after 5 days. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (15 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Down-to-up rectal resection is an interesting procedure, and when associated with single incision laparoscopy, it offers the possibility to use the single site as the site for temporary ileostomy.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
2845 views
40 likes
0 comments
12:53
Transanal laparoscopic TME with a new port assisted by single incision
Background: Rectal resection with total mesorectal excision (TME) can be performed through the anus going up into the abdominal cavity. This approach has to be performed using a transanal device in order to create a retroperitoneum, allowing the surgeon to perform a TME similar to the one performed from the abdomen going down to the anus. A new reusable port named DAPRI Port or D-Port (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) has been developed, and a new platform together with curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope) has been created. The D-Port allows to maintain one of the rules of laparoscopy, which is the optical system in the middle of the two ancillary operative tools. In addition, the cost of the procedure is not increased, due to the reusable material.
Video: This video shows a down-to-up rectal resection assisted by single incision laparoscopy, in a 65-year old man presenting with a rectal adenocarcinoma 4cm away from the anal margin. Preoperative work-up showed a T2N0M0 tumor, after radiochemotherapy. The procedure was performed transabdominally for the vascular dissection and transanally for the TME. The abdominal single site was then used for the placement of the temporary ileostomy.
Results: Total operative time was 301 minutes, and partial transanal laparoscopy was 145 minutes. Perioperative bleeding was 50cc. The final scar length was 2.5cm, and the patient was discharged after 5 days. The pathological report confirmed a pT2N0M0 tumor (15 negative nodes).
Conclusions: Down-to-up rectal resection is an interesting procedure, and when associated with single incision laparoscopy, it offers the possibility to use the single site as the site for temporary ileostomy.
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic segmental small bowel resection including 3 different intracorporeal anastomoses
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) can be offered to young ladies presenting with malignant digestive tumors since they can undergo surgery through a suprapubic access, with a final non-visible result because it is under the bikini line.
Video: A 40-year-old woman presenting with an unknown anemia was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up evidenced an adenocarcinoma of the small bowel at 120cm from the pylorus. A suprapubic SIL segmental small bowel resection was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs, using three reusable ports placed above the pubic bone. Curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) allowed surgeons to work in good ergonomic conditions, maintaining a low cost for SIL. For the insertion of the linear stapler, a temporary 5mm scope was used and the intestinal continuity was established by a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-end anastomosis. Another option is to perform a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-side anastomosis (especially in case of obstructive tumor) or a linear mechanical side-to-side anastomosis. The mesenteric window was closed. The specimen was extracted suprapubically with a wound protection once the three windows of the ports have been joined together.
Results: Laparoscopy took 160 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No postoperative complications were noted and the use of minimal pain killers allowed for patient discharge after four days. Pathological findings demonstrated a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the jejunum, with 17 negative nodes (pT3N0Mx). The postoperative follow-up, including blood tests and PET-scan, did not show any recurrence at 12 months.
Conclusions: In addition to the known advantages of conventional multiport laparoscopy, the SIL technique allows to offer satisfying oncological results in addition to a non-visible surgical scar, because it is localized under the bikini line. Additionally, abdominal trauma and the final scar length can be reduced, since they are related to the tumor’s size.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
921 views
23 likes
0 comments
11:21
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic segmental small bowel resection including 3 different intracorporeal anastomoses
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) can be offered to young ladies presenting with malignant digestive tumors since they can undergo surgery through a suprapubic access, with a final non-visible result because it is under the bikini line.
Video: A 40-year-old woman presenting with an unknown anemia was admitted to our department. Preoperative work-up evidenced an adenocarcinoma of the small bowel at 120cm from the pylorus. A suprapubic SIL segmental small bowel resection was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed with the surgeon standing between the patient’s legs, using three reusable ports placed above the pubic bone. Curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany) allowed surgeons to work in good ergonomic conditions, maintaining a low cost for SIL. For the insertion of the linear stapler, a temporary 5mm scope was used and the intestinal continuity was established by a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-end anastomosis. Another option is to perform a completely intracorporeal manual end-to-side anastomosis (especially in case of obstructive tumor) or a linear mechanical side-to-side anastomosis. The mesenteric window was closed. The specimen was extracted suprapubically with a wound protection once the three windows of the ports have been joined together.
Results: Laparoscopy took 160 minutes and perioperative bleeding was 20cc. No postoperative complications were noted and the use of minimal pain killers allowed for patient discharge after four days. Pathological findings demonstrated a poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma of the jejunum, with 17 negative nodes (pT3N0Mx). The postoperative follow-up, including blood tests and PET-scan, did not show any recurrence at 12 months.
Conclusions: In addition to the known advantages of conventional multiport laparoscopy, the SIL technique allows to offer satisfying oncological results in addition to a non-visible surgical scar, because it is localized under the bikini line. Additionally, abdominal trauma and the final scar length can be reduced, since they are related to the tumor’s size.
Manual colorectal anastomosis during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. A suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of an extended scar due to a large tumor. An intracorporeal circular mechanical anastomosis is the most common type. A manual anastomosis is feasible and allows to control lumen opening, potential bleeding, and overall to overcome the difficulty of transanal stapler insertion in case of high rectal transection.
Video: This video shows two different types of manual colorectal anastomosis, through a right suprapubic access.
1) Double-layer end-to-end
2) Monolayer end-to-end
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform the manual anastomosis is 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different colorectal anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire left hemicolectomy, please click here.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3922 views
85 likes
0 comments
04:02
Manual colorectal anastomosis during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. A suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of an extended scar due to a large tumor. An intracorporeal circular mechanical anastomosis is the most common type. A manual anastomosis is feasible and allows to control lumen opening, potential bleeding, and overall to overcome the difficulty of transanal stapler insertion in case of high rectal transection.
Video: This video shows two different types of manual colorectal anastomosis, through a right suprapubic access.
1) Double-layer end-to-end
2) Monolayer end-to-end
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform the manual anastomosis is 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different colorectal anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire left hemicolectomy, please click here.
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3958 views
178 likes
0 comments
07:58
Four different intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses during suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy
Background: Single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy is a feasible procedure. Suprapubic access allows to offer satisfactory cosmetic results in case of extended scar due to a large tumor. Intracorporeal anastomosis is mandatory through a suprapubic access, because it prevents traction on the mesentery and on the transverse mesocolon.
Video: This video shows four different types of intracorporeal ileocolic anastomoses.
1) Linear mechanical side-to-side
2) Completely manual side-to-side
3) Completely manual end-to-side
4) Completely manual end-to-end
At the end of each type of anastomosis, mesenteric defect closure is mandatory, to prevent intestinal obstruction caused by internal hernia.
Results: After an appropriate learning curve, time to perform linear mechanical anastomosis is 25 minutes and manual anastomosis takes 40 minutes.
Conclusions: Different ileocolic anastomoses can be performed and the surgeon has to choose the appropriate one, case by case.
To watch the video demonstrating the entire right hemicolectomy, please click here.
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy with 1.8mm epigastric trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Single access laparoscopic adrenalectomy has been reported in supine and prone patient positioning. The authors report the technique with the patient in supine position, with the umbilicus as access site, and with all adopted material as reusable.

Video: A 43-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for symptomatic primary hyperaldosteronism. A right-side adrenal adenoma was diagnosed, and surgery was proposed. The patient was placed in a supine position with a mild semi-lateral left-sided decubitus. The technique was performed using an 11mm reusable trocar to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree rigid and regular length scope, in addition to curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). The right liver lobe was retracted using the 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope), inserted percutaneously under the 12th right rib. The procedure started with the adhesiolysis between the hepatic surface and right Gerota’s fascia. Then, after having identified the adrenal gland, it was dissected and the inferior adrenal arteries and veins were clipped between 5mm Hem-o-lok® clips (Teleflex Medical, Research Triangle Park, NC, US). The middle adrenal vein was clipped as well using the 5mm Hem-o-lok® ligation systems. Once the specimen was completely mobilized, a plastic bag (used for suction drain) was custom-made and introduced into the abdomen through the 11mm trocar. The specimen was removed transumbilically, and the procedure finished with the closure of the access site by absorbable figure of 8 sutures.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 98 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length was 16mm. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 days.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy is feasible and safe. With this technique, the cost of the procedure is not increased, the final scar length is minimal, and the working triangulation is established intrabdominally as well as externally.
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1876 views
25 likes
0 comments
06:24
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy with 1.8mm epigastric trocarless grasping forceps
Background: Single access laparoscopic adrenalectomy has been reported in supine and prone patient positioning. The authors report the technique with the patient in supine position, with the umbilicus as access site, and with all adopted material as reusable.

Video: A 43-year-old woman was admitted to the hospital for symptomatic primary hyperaldosteronism. A right-side adrenal adenoma was diagnosed, and surgery was proposed. The patient was placed in a supine position with a mild semi-lateral left-sided decubitus. The technique was performed using an 11mm reusable trocar to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree rigid and regular length scope, in addition to curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tuttlingen, Germany). The right liver lobe was retracted using the 1.8mm trocarless grasping forceps according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope), inserted percutaneously under the 12th right rib. The procedure started with the adhesiolysis between the hepatic surface and right Gerota’s fascia. Then, after having identified the adrenal gland, it was dissected and the inferior adrenal arteries and veins were clipped between 5mm Hem-o-lok® clips (Teleflex Medical, Research Triangle Park, NC, US). The middle adrenal vein was clipped as well using the 5mm Hem-o-lok® ligation systems. Once the specimen was completely mobilized, a plastic bag (used for suction drain) was custom-made and introduced into the abdomen through the 11mm trocar. The specimen was removed transumbilically, and the procedure finished with the closure of the access site by absorbable figure of 8 sutures.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 98 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length was 16mm. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 2 days.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single access laparoscopic right adrenalectomy is feasible and safe. With this technique, the cost of the procedure is not increased, the final scar length is minimal, and the working triangulation is established intrabdominally as well as externally.
Reduced port laparoscopic surgery: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with manual gastrojejunostomy
Background: The philosophy to reduce the invasiveness of minimal access surgery invested the last years of general laparoscopy. Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been reported to be feasible and safe. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) consists in performing conventional multiport laparoscopic procedures through a reduction in port number and size. In morbid obesity surgery, since patients undergo plastic reconstruction during follow-up, and the umbilicus is not a landmark and associated with wound complications due to adipose tissue, RPLS appears more valuable than SILS.

Video: A 21-year-old woman was admitted to the centre for morbid obesity. Her preoperative weight was 117 kg and her BMI was 40 kg/m2. A reduced port laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RPLGB) was proposed. The patient was placed legs apart on the operating table and the surgeon stood between her legs. Three ports were placed: a 12mm port in the umbilicus, a 5mm port in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank. A 10mm, 30-degree scope was introduced into the 12mm port which remained there throughout the procedure except during the insertion of the roticulator linear stapler when the scope was switched to a 5mm, 30-degree one and introduced into the 5mm left flank port. A percutaneous stitch was placed at the apex of the right crus in order to retract the left liver lobe. A conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with manual end-to-side one-layer gastrojejunostomy (length of alimentary limb: 50cm) and linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, including closure of mesenteric and Petersen’s spaces.

Results: Operative time was 120 minutes and blood loss was unsignificant. Postoperative pain was controlled by paracetamol (4 g/day) used during the first 24 hours only. Patient discharge was allowed after 72 hours.

Conclusions: RPLGB for morbid obesity offers favorable cosmetic results in addition to reduced abdominal trauma and postoperative pain.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2056 views
14 likes
0 comments
09:19
Reduced port laparoscopic surgery: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with manual gastrojejunostomy
Background: The philosophy to reduce the invasiveness of minimal access surgery invested the last years of general laparoscopy. Single incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS) has been reported to be feasible and safe. Reduced port laparoscopic surgery (RPLS) consists in performing conventional multiport laparoscopic procedures through a reduction in port number and size. In morbid obesity surgery, since patients undergo plastic reconstruction during follow-up, and the umbilicus is not a landmark and associated with wound complications due to adipose tissue, RPLS appears more valuable than SILS.

Video: A 21-year-old woman was admitted to the centre for morbid obesity. Her preoperative weight was 117 kg and her BMI was 40 kg/m2. A reduced port laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RPLGB) was proposed. The patient was placed legs apart on the operating table and the surgeon stood between her legs. Three ports were placed: a 12mm port in the umbilicus, a 5mm port in the right flank, and a 5mm port in the left flank. A 10mm, 30-degree scope was introduced into the 12mm port which remained there throughout the procedure except during the insertion of the roticulator linear stapler when the scope was switched to a 5mm, 30-degree one and introduced into the 5mm left flank port. A percutaneous stitch was placed at the apex of the right crus in order to retract the left liver lobe. A conventional Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with manual end-to-side one-layer gastrojejunostomy (length of alimentary limb: 50cm) and linear mechanical side-to-side jejunojejunostomy were performed, including closure of mesenteric and Petersen’s spaces.

Results: Operative time was 120 minutes and blood loss was unsignificant. Postoperative pain was controlled by paracetamol (4 g/day) used during the first 24 hours only. Patient discharge was allowed after 72 hours.

Conclusions: RPLGB for morbid obesity offers favorable cosmetic results in addition to reduced abdominal trauma and postoperative pain.
Single incision transumbilical laparoscopic bilateral inguinal hernia repair (TEP)
Background: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia by preperitoneal mesh placement (TEP) has been popularized. Recently, with the advent of single incision transumbilical laparoscopy, this procedure has to be considered because it allows to place a big mesh with a very small final scar, which is also cosmetically acceptable.

Video: A 48-year-old male was admitted to hospital for right direct and indirect and left direct inguinal hernia. A single-incision transumbilical bilateral TEP was proposed. The patient was placed in a supine position with his legs straight. The surgeon stood first on the patient’s left and on the patient’s right later on in the procedure. The natural umbilical scar was incised and the rectus fascia on the left side was opened. A purse-string suture using Vicryl 1 was placed starting at a 9 o’clock position. An 11mm reusable metallic trocar was introduced behind the left rectus muscle into the preperitoneal space. A 0-degree, normal length and rigid scope was advanced into the 11mm trocar and the preperitoneal space was insufflated. This space was dissected using the optical system, first on the right side, and then on the left side. At the time of hernia sac retraction, a monocurved reusable grasping forceps IV according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany) was introduced inside the purse-string suture, at a 9 o’clock position, parallel to the 11mm trocar. The bilateral hernia sac was reduced, the peritoneal sheet was retracted, and the spermatic elements skeletonized. Two 15cm (latero-lateral) by 10cm (medial cranio-caudal) by 8cm (lateral cranio-caudal) polypropylene meshes (Bard Davol Inc., Warwick RI, US) were introduced through the 11mm trocar. Both meshes were adequately positioned using the monocurved grasping forceps, placing the lateral corner anteriorly to the peritoneal sheet and the medial corner underneath the pubic bone. Meshes were not fixed and the space was desufflated under view.

Results: Operative time was 67 minutes and the final incision length was 12mm. Postoperative pain was controlled by paracetamol (4 g/day) and the patient was discharged after 24 hours.

Conclusions: Single incision transumbilical bilateral TEP makes sense because it allows to place two big meshes using a very small final scar. This treatment allows to increase abdominal trauma reduction, already obtained through conventional multitrocar laparoscopic TEP.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
4272 views
78 likes
0 comments
07:50
Single incision transumbilical laparoscopic bilateral inguinal hernia repair (TEP)
Background: Laparoscopic repair of inguinal hernia by preperitoneal mesh placement (TEP) has been popularized. Recently, with the advent of single incision transumbilical laparoscopy, this procedure has to be considered because it allows to place a big mesh with a very small final scar, which is also cosmetically acceptable.

Video: A 48-year-old male was admitted to hospital for right direct and indirect and left direct inguinal hernia. A single-incision transumbilical bilateral TEP was proposed. The patient was placed in a supine position with his legs straight. The surgeon stood first on the patient’s left and on the patient’s right later on in the procedure. The natural umbilical scar was incised and the rectus fascia on the left side was opened. A purse-string suture using Vicryl 1 was placed starting at a 9 o’clock position. An 11mm reusable metallic trocar was introduced behind the left rectus muscle into the preperitoneal space. A 0-degree, normal length and rigid scope was advanced into the 11mm trocar and the preperitoneal space was insufflated. This space was dissected using the optical system, first on the right side, and then on the left side. At the time of hernia sac retraction, a monocurved reusable grasping forceps IV according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany) was introduced inside the purse-string suture, at a 9 o’clock position, parallel to the 11mm trocar. The bilateral hernia sac was reduced, the peritoneal sheet was retracted, and the spermatic elements skeletonized. Two 15cm (latero-lateral) by 10cm (medial cranio-caudal) by 8cm (lateral cranio-caudal) polypropylene meshes (Bard Davol Inc., Warwick RI, US) were introduced through the 11mm trocar. Both meshes were adequately positioned using the monocurved grasping forceps, placing the lateral corner anteriorly to the peritoneal sheet and the medial corner underneath the pubic bone. Meshes were not fixed and the space was desufflated under view.

Results: Operative time was 67 minutes and the final incision length was 12mm. Postoperative pain was controlled by paracetamol (4 g/day) and the patient was discharged after 24 hours.

Conclusions: Single incision transumbilical bilateral TEP makes sense because it allows to place two big meshes using a very small final scar. This treatment allows to increase abdominal trauma reduction, already obtained through conventional multitrocar laparoscopic TEP.
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic left adrenalectomy for symptomatic pheochromocytoma
Background: Single access laparoscopy has been reported for adrenal gland surgery. This technique can also be applied for patients presenting non-small lesions and symptomatic diseases such as pheochromocytoma.

Video: A 17-year-old woman was admitted to hospital for severe headaches, palpitations, and tachycardia along with tremulousness, dizziness, and vomiting. A symptomatic left-side single location adrenal pheochromocytoma was diagnosed and a transumbilical single access laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was proposed. The patient was placed in a semi-lateral right-sided decubitus. The technique was performed using an 11mm reusable trocar to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree rigid and regular length scope in addition to curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany). The procedure started with the opening of the splenocolic ligament and, after mobilization of the splenopancreatic block medially, the adrenal lesion was demonstrated. Probably due to the size of the lesion, only two main adrenal vessels were found: vein and mid-artery. Both vessels were dissected and divided between 5mm non-absorbable clips. The specimen was retrieved transumbilically in a custom-made plastic bag.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 129 minutes, estimated blood loss 20cc, and the final scar length measured 16mm. The symptomatic status of the patient was resolved immediately. The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit after 3 days and from the hospital after 6 days.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single access laparoscopic left adrenalectomy for symptomatic pheochromocytoma is feasible and safe. In young ladies, it offers an excellent cosmetic result, avoiding abdominal trauma.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1514 views
14 likes
0 comments
07:29
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic left adrenalectomy for symptomatic pheochromocytoma
Background: Single access laparoscopy has been reported for adrenal gland surgery. This technique can also be applied for patients presenting non-small lesions and symptomatic diseases such as pheochromocytoma.

Video: A 17-year-old woman was admitted to hospital for severe headaches, palpitations, and tachycardia along with tremulousness, dizziness, and vomiting. A symptomatic left-side single location adrenal pheochromocytoma was diagnosed and a transumbilical single access laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was proposed. The patient was placed in a semi-lateral right-sided decubitus. The technique was performed using an 11mm reusable trocar to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree rigid and regular length scope in addition to curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany). The procedure started with the opening of the splenocolic ligament and, after mobilization of the splenopancreatic block medially, the adrenal lesion was demonstrated. Probably due to the size of the lesion, only two main adrenal vessels were found: vein and mid-artery. Both vessels were dissected and divided between 5mm non-absorbable clips. The specimen was retrieved transumbilically in a custom-made plastic bag.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 129 minutes, estimated blood loss 20cc, and the final scar length measured 16mm. The symptomatic status of the patient was resolved immediately. The patient was discharged from the intensive care unit after 3 days and from the hospital after 6 days.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single access laparoscopic left adrenalectomy for symptomatic pheochromocytoma is feasible and safe. In young ladies, it offers an excellent cosmetic result, avoiding abdominal trauma.
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy (SILLH): an alternative to the umbilical access
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) has been described for colorectal surgery because it mainly provides an improved cosmetic outcome. A suprapubic access can be considered an alternative to the umbilical site for left hemicolectomy (LH) because the scar remains under the bikini line and can be considered cosmetically acceptable.

Video: A 61-year-old man was admitted to hospital for adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon; preoperative work-up did not show the presence of secondary lesions. A suprapubic SILLH was proposed to the patient. The technique consisted in performing the procedure through an initial 3.5cm skin incision, localized suprapubically, with the insertion of 3 reusable trocars vertically in a pararectal axis along with DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany). The vascular plane was firstly controlled by clips and, after mobilization of the entire left colon, the upper rectum was transected and the specimen was removed using the same access; a conventional circular transanal anastomosis was performed.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 119 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length measured 4.5cm. Pathology confirmed the presence of a colon adenocarcinoma (pT2N0Mx). Postoperative pain was minimal, allowing the patient to be discharged on postoperative day 4.

Conclusions: Suprapubic SILLH offers the option to enlarge the skin incision according to the specimen’s size without any cosmetic damage, because it remains under the bikini line. The dissection plane appears in front of the access and postoperative pain remains minimal.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
4278 views
30 likes
0 comments
08:07
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic left hemicolectomy (SILLH): an alternative to the umbilical access
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) has been described for colorectal surgery because it mainly provides an improved cosmetic outcome. A suprapubic access can be considered an alternative to the umbilical site for left hemicolectomy (LH) because the scar remains under the bikini line and can be considered cosmetically acceptable.

Video: A 61-year-old man was admitted to hospital for adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon; preoperative work-up did not show the presence of secondary lesions. A suprapubic SILLH was proposed to the patient. The technique consisted in performing the procedure through an initial 3.5cm skin incision, localized suprapubically, with the insertion of 3 reusable trocars vertically in a pararectal axis along with DAPRI curved reusable instruments (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany). The vascular plane was firstly controlled by clips and, after mobilization of the entire left colon, the upper rectum was transected and the specimen was removed using the same access; a conventional circular transanal anastomosis was performed.

Results: Laparoscopic time was 119 minutes, estimated blood loss was 20cc, and the final scar length measured 4.5cm. Pathology confirmed the presence of a colon adenocarcinoma (pT2N0Mx). Postoperative pain was minimal, allowing the patient to be discharged on postoperative day 4.

Conclusions: Suprapubic SILLH offers the option to enlarge the skin incision according to the specimen’s size without any cosmetic damage, because it remains under the bikini line. The dissection plane appears in front of the access and postoperative pain remains minimal.
Single incision laparoscopic gastrojejunal bypass with intraoperative ultrasonography for obstructive pancreatic head tumor
Background: Pancreatic head tumors can be diagnosed immediately as symptomatic although the biliary tract is not involved. Single incision laparoscopy can be proposed as a valid option to allow an early beginning of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

Video: A 56-year-old man was admitted to hospital for vomiting and weight loss. Preoperative work-up showed the presence of an advanced and obstructive pancreatic head adenocarcinoma, not interesting the biliary tract. A laparoscopic gastro-jejunal bypass with staging laparoscopy, through a transumbilical single-access, was proposed to the patient. The technique consisted in the insertion of an 11mm reusable trocar, two 6mm flexible reusable trocars, and curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany) through the same umbilical incision. The procedure started with the exploration of the parietal peritoneum, lavage of the cavity, opening of the lesser sac for perioperative ultrasonography, and ended with linear mechanical side-to-side gastrojejunostomy.

Results: The obstructive status of the patient resolved during the postoperative course and the patient started neo-adjuvant chemotherapy after 10 days.

Conclusions: Single incision laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy for obstructive pancreatic head tumor, after staging laparoscopy including perioperative ultrasonography, permits the resolution of the clinical status as well as an early beginning of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2285 views
54 likes
0 comments
06:40
Single incision laparoscopic gastrojejunal bypass with intraoperative ultrasonography for obstructive pancreatic head tumor
Background: Pancreatic head tumors can be diagnosed immediately as symptomatic although the biliary tract is not involved. Single incision laparoscopy can be proposed as a valid option to allow an early beginning of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.

Video: A 56-year-old man was admitted to hospital for vomiting and weight loss. Preoperative work-up showed the presence of an advanced and obstructive pancreatic head adenocarcinoma, not interesting the biliary tract. A laparoscopic gastro-jejunal bypass with staging laparoscopy, through a transumbilical single-access, was proposed to the patient. The technique consisted in the insertion of an 11mm reusable trocar, two 6mm flexible reusable trocars, and curved reusable instruments according to DAPRI (Karl Storz Endoskope, Tüttlingen, Germany) through the same umbilical incision. The procedure started with the exploration of the parietal peritoneum, lavage of the cavity, opening of the lesser sac for perioperative ultrasonography, and ended with linear mechanical side-to-side gastrojejunostomy.

Results: The obstructive status of the patient resolved during the postoperative course and the patient started neo-adjuvant chemotherapy after 10 days.

Conclusions: Single incision laparoscopic gastrojejunostomy for obstructive pancreatic head tumor, after staging laparoscopy including perioperative ultrasonography, permits the resolution of the clinical status as well as an early beginning of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy.
Laparoscopic hand-sewn re-gastrojejunostomy for complicated Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a popular bariatric procedure associated with potential risk of late complications such as anastomotic stricture, marginal ulceration, fistula formation, weight gain, and nutritional deficiencies. A 48-year-old woman submitted to LRYGB 1.5 year before, presented a marginal ulcer of the gastrojejunostomy, non-responsive to medical therapy, associated with total dysphagia and cachexia. At the time of LRYGB, a linear stapled side-to-side gastrojejunostomy has been performed.

Video: The revision was completed using 4 abdominal trocars and consisted in these successive steps: adhesiolysis between the left liver lobe, gastrojejunostomy and gastric pouch; identification of right crus and lower esophagus; mobilization of the stoma and gastric pouch from both crura, transverse colon and gastric remnant; division of the gastric pouch above the stoma with preservation of the left gastric vessels; division of the proximal alimentary limb under the stoma; new double-layer hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy (PDS 1 externally, PDS 2/0 internally); hiatoplasty; leak test; specimen’s removal through trocar enlargement.

Results: No perioperative complications or additional trocars were registered. Operative time was 157 minutes and estimated blood loss 20 cc. The postoperative course was uneventful and patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. After 1 year, the patient is well and tolerates a regular diet.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications after LRYGB, such as marginal ulcer, can be safely treated by laparoscopy. New hand-sewn anastomosis permits to control the stoma openings and to calibrate the anastomosis size, especially in case of small gastric pouch.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1392 views
15 likes
0 comments
09:18
Laparoscopic hand-sewn re-gastrojejunostomy for complicated Roux-en-Y gastric bypass
Introduction: Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) is a popular bariatric procedure associated with potential risk of late complications such as anastomotic stricture, marginal ulceration, fistula formation, weight gain, and nutritional deficiencies. A 48-year-old woman submitted to LRYGB 1.5 year before, presented a marginal ulcer of the gastrojejunostomy, non-responsive to medical therapy, associated with total dysphagia and cachexia. At the time of LRYGB, a linear stapled side-to-side gastrojejunostomy has been performed.

Video: The revision was completed using 4 abdominal trocars and consisted in these successive steps: adhesiolysis between the left liver lobe, gastrojejunostomy and gastric pouch; identification of right crus and lower esophagus; mobilization of the stoma and gastric pouch from both crura, transverse colon and gastric remnant; division of the gastric pouch above the stoma with preservation of the left gastric vessels; division of the proximal alimentary limb under the stoma; new double-layer hand-sewn gastrojejunostomy (PDS 1 externally, PDS 2/0 internally); hiatoplasty; leak test; specimen’s removal through trocar enlargement.

Results: No perioperative complications or additional trocars were registered. Operative time was 157 minutes and estimated blood loss 20 cc. The postoperative course was uneventful and patient was discharged on postoperative day 3. After 1 year, the patient is well and tolerates a regular diet.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications after LRYGB, such as marginal ulcer, can be safely treated by laparoscopy. New hand-sewn anastomosis permits to control the stoma openings and to calibrate the anastomosis size, especially in case of small gastric pouch.
Laparoscopic revision of stenotic colorectal anastomosis
Background: Colorectal anastomosis is usually performed using a circular stapler inserted transanally. Postoperative complications such as strictures are rare and related to various factors like ischemia, poor vascularization, and previous leak. This video shows a laparoscopic revision of a stenotic colorectal anastomosis, solved with a new hand-sewn anastomosis.

Video: A 51-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for symptomatic diverticulosis. At that time, a transanal circular mechanical end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed using a 29mm circular stapler. After 3 months of follow-up, a symptomatic stenotic colorectal anastomosis was evidenced, and endoscopic dilatation (repeated 3 times) remained unsuccessful. Preoperative barium enema showed a stenotic anastomosis and some residual diverticulosis. A laparoscopic 3-trocar revision was scheduled. On exploration of the abdominal cavity, the anastomosis appeared thickened and strictly adherent to the left ureter. After proper mobilization, a segmental colorectal resection was performed and a new anastomosis was fashioned in an end-to-end hand-sewn technique.

Results: The procedure was completed by laparoscopy without additional trocars. Operative time was 202 minutes and blood loss 20cc. The patient was allowed to be discharged on the 4th postoperative day, and after 6 months, he is fine, without intestinal trouble.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications of colorectal anastomosis, such as strictures, can be managed laparoscopically. A new hand-sewn anastomosis is feasible and it allows for control of the vascularization and openings of both colonic and rectal lumens.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1950 views
20 likes
0 comments
06:20
Laparoscopic revision of stenotic colorectal anastomosis
Background: Colorectal anastomosis is usually performed using a circular stapler inserted transanally. Postoperative complications such as strictures are rare and related to various factors like ischemia, poor vascularization, and previous leak. This video shows a laparoscopic revision of a stenotic colorectal anastomosis, solved with a new hand-sewn anastomosis.

Video: A 51-year-old man underwent laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for symptomatic diverticulosis. At that time, a transanal circular mechanical end-to-end colorectal anastomosis was performed using a 29mm circular stapler. After 3 months of follow-up, a symptomatic stenotic colorectal anastomosis was evidenced, and endoscopic dilatation (repeated 3 times) remained unsuccessful. Preoperative barium enema showed a stenotic anastomosis and some residual diverticulosis. A laparoscopic 3-trocar revision was scheduled. On exploration of the abdominal cavity, the anastomosis appeared thickened and strictly adherent to the left ureter. After proper mobilization, a segmental colorectal resection was performed and a new anastomosis was fashioned in an end-to-end hand-sewn technique.

Results: The procedure was completed by laparoscopy without additional trocars. Operative time was 202 minutes and blood loss 20cc. The patient was allowed to be discharged on the 4th postoperative day, and after 6 months, he is fine, without intestinal trouble.

Conclusions: Postoperative complications of colorectal anastomosis, such as strictures, can be managed laparoscopically. A new hand-sewn anastomosis is feasible and it allows for control of the vascularization and openings of both colonic and rectal lumens.
Repair of distal esophageal perforation (Boerhaave’s syndrome) by left thoracoscopy with the patient in prone position
Background: Boerhaave’s syndrome is an emergency disease related to a high risk of mortality and morbidity. Surgical treatment is usually performed by thoracotomy or thoracoscopy with the patient in lateral position. The authors report a patient with a distal esophageal perforation treated by left thoracoscopy in prone position.

Clinical case: A 44-year-old man was admitted to our emergency room following a 14-hour episode of vomiting and hematemesis. Preoperative work-up evidenced a perforation of the distal esophagus on the left side, associated with a pneumomediastinum. The patient underwent a left thoracoscopy in a prone position, after induction of general anesthesia using a Carlens-type double lumen tube. Three trocars of 5mm, 10mm, and 5mm, were placed in the 5th, 7th, and 10th intercostal spaces respectively. Exploration of the chest cavity revealed the presence of free liquid and fibrin, with no evidence of esophageal perforation. However, the esophageal perforation was demonstrated after dissection of the mediastinal pleura, and appeared to be 2cm in length. A nasogastric tube was advanced into the stomach under visual control, and an additional trocarless grasper was placed in the 10th intercostal space to improve exposure. The esophagus perforation was closed using 2/0 silk interrupted sutures, with a reinforcement patch using the inferior pulmonary ligament. The cavity was cleansed and the 5mm trocar was replaced with a chest tube in the 10th intercostal space, with its tip close to the suture.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and no significant operative bleeding was noted. The patient was admitted to hospital in the Intensive Care Unit and extubated after 24 hours. A chest tube was placed in the right chest after 10 days for a pleural effusion, and a pericardial drain was placed after 16 days for pericardial tamponade. A gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 10 revealed a residual sinus at the site of the perforation. Another gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 20 was negative for leakage. The patient was discharged after 32 days.

Conclusions: Esophageal perforation can be treated by thoracoscopy with the patient placed in a prone position as access is facilitated by the effect of gravity on the cardiopulmonary organs. The success of the primary suture depends on the timing between the incident and the treatment; however, morbidity remains high.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
3041 views
59 likes
0 comments
07:11
Repair of distal esophageal perforation (Boerhaave’s syndrome) by left thoracoscopy with the patient in prone position
Background: Boerhaave’s syndrome is an emergency disease related to a high risk of mortality and morbidity. Surgical treatment is usually performed by thoracotomy or thoracoscopy with the patient in lateral position. The authors report a patient with a distal esophageal perforation treated by left thoracoscopy in prone position.

Clinical case: A 44-year-old man was admitted to our emergency room following a 14-hour episode of vomiting and hematemesis. Preoperative work-up evidenced a perforation of the distal esophagus on the left side, associated with a pneumomediastinum. The patient underwent a left thoracoscopy in a prone position, after induction of general anesthesia using a Carlens-type double lumen tube. Three trocars of 5mm, 10mm, and 5mm, were placed in the 5th, 7th, and 10th intercostal spaces respectively. Exploration of the chest cavity revealed the presence of free liquid and fibrin, with no evidence of esophageal perforation. However, the esophageal perforation was demonstrated after dissection of the mediastinal pleura, and appeared to be 2cm in length. A nasogastric tube was advanced into the stomach under visual control, and an additional trocarless grasper was placed in the 10th intercostal space to improve exposure. The esophagus perforation was closed using 2/0 silk interrupted sutures, with a reinforcement patch using the inferior pulmonary ligament. The cavity was cleansed and the 5mm trocar was replaced with a chest tube in the 10th intercostal space, with its tip close to the suture.

Results: Operative time was 90 minutes, and no significant operative bleeding was noted. The patient was admitted to hospital in the Intensive Care Unit and extubated after 24 hours. A chest tube was placed in the right chest after 10 days for a pleural effusion, and a pericardial drain was placed after 16 days for pericardial tamponade. A gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 10 revealed a residual sinus at the site of the perforation. Another gastrograffin swallow test on postoperative day 20 was negative for leakage. The patient was discharged after 32 days.

Conclusions: Esophageal perforation can be treated by thoracoscopy with the patient placed in a prone position as access is facilitated by the effect of gravity on the cardiopulmonary organs. The success of the primary suture depends on the timing between the incident and the treatment; however, morbidity remains high.
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pericystectomy of liver segment 7
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has recently sparked interest mainly to improve cosmetic outcomes, while other potential advantages are currently under evaluation. This video presents a pericystectomy of liver segment 7 performed in a patient with a hydatic cyst.

Clinical case: A 26-year-old female, without any surgical history but with a body mass index of 20.6 kg/m2 consulted for a hepatic lesion. Preoperative work-up showed a hydatic cyst of liver segment 7 with renal adhesions. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope), and a straight Ligasure™ V (Covidien). Intraoperative ultrasonography allowed to identify the edges of pericystectomy. The specimen was retrieved through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag, and morcellated at that level.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor insertion of additional ports were necessary. Laparoscopy took 160 minutes, and the final umbilical incision length was 16mm. Pathologic data confirmed the presence of a hydatic cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial in liver surgery for benign lesions, due to minimal final scar length, which has cosmetic as well as additional potential advantages that need to be further investigated.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2847 views
66 likes
0 comments
05:40
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic pericystectomy of liver segment 7
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has recently sparked interest mainly to improve cosmetic outcomes, while other potential advantages are currently under evaluation. This video presents a pericystectomy of liver segment 7 performed in a patient with a hydatic cyst.

Clinical case: A 26-year-old female, without any surgical history but with a body mass index of 20.6 kg/m2 consulted for a hepatic lesion. Preoperative work-up showed a hydatic cyst of liver segment 7 with renal adhesions. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port to accommodate a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope), and a straight Ligasure™ V (Covidien). Intraoperative ultrasonography allowed to identify the edges of pericystectomy. The specimen was retrieved through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag, and morcellated at that level.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor insertion of additional ports were necessary. Laparoscopy took 160 minutes, and the final umbilical incision length was 16mm. Pathologic data confirmed the presence of a hydatic cyst. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 5.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial in liver surgery for benign lesions, due to minimal final scar length, which has cosmetic as well as additional potential advantages that need to be further investigated.
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication
Background: Different procedures have been reported to be feasible and safe through single access laparoscopy (SAL). A transumbilical SAL Toupet fundoplication is demonstrated here.

Video: A young lady sought care for gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with grade B esophagitis, hiatal hernia and esophageal dyskinesia. The SAL procedure was performed by the opening of the umbilicus through Hasson’s technique. An 11mm reusable trocar was inserted for a 10mm, 30-degree angled, non-flexible, and standard length scope. Curved reusable instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope) were introduced through the same scar without trocars. The gastroesophageal junction was exposed thanks to the insertion of a 2mm wire under the xiphoid access. Crura repair and fundoplication were performed using intracorporeal knots, with a curved needle-holder. The umbilicus was finally closed in layers.

Results: No extra-umbilical trocar was necessary, and no intraoperative complications were registered. Operative time was 172 minutes and the final umbilical scar was 15mm. Postoperative pain was kept minimal, and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day after a satisfying gastrograffin swallow.

Conclusions: Transumbilical SAL Toupet fundoplication is feasible. Use of curved and reusable instruments permits to avoid the conflict between the instruments’ tips intracorporeally or between the surgeons’ hands externally. Thanks to this technique, the cost of SAL is similar to multi-trocar laparoscopy.
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2878 views
35 likes
0 comments
08:05
Transumbilical single access laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication
Background: Different procedures have been reported to be feasible and safe through single access laparoscopy (SAL). A transumbilical SAL Toupet fundoplication is demonstrated here.

Video: A young lady sought care for gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with grade B esophagitis, hiatal hernia and esophageal dyskinesia. The SAL procedure was performed by the opening of the umbilicus through Hasson’s technique. An 11mm reusable trocar was inserted for a 10mm, 30-degree angled, non-flexible, and standard length scope. Curved reusable instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope) were introduced through the same scar without trocars. The gastroesophageal junction was exposed thanks to the insertion of a 2mm wire under the xiphoid access. Crura repair and fundoplication were performed using intracorporeal knots, with a curved needle-holder. The umbilicus was finally closed in layers.

Results: No extra-umbilical trocar was necessary, and no intraoperative complications were registered. Operative time was 172 minutes and the final umbilical scar was 15mm. Postoperative pain was kept minimal, and the patient was discharged on the third postoperative day after a satisfying gastrograffin swallow.

Conclusions: Transumbilical SAL Toupet fundoplication is feasible. Use of curved and reusable instruments permits to avoid the conflict between the instruments’ tips intracorporeally or between the surgeons’ hands externally. Thanks to this technique, the cost of SAL is similar to multi-trocar laparoscopy.
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) has recently sparked considerable interest. The objectives of this technique are to improve cosmetic outcomes and to reduce invasiveness. Until now the umbilicus was the preferred way of entry, but suprapubic access can be an alternative especially for right hemicolectomy.

Clinical case: A 50-year-old male, without previous surgical history and a body mass index of 22 kg/m2 underwent colonoscopy due to anemia. A large base polyp was found in the right colon, and biopsy revealed a colic adenocarcinoma. No distant metastasis or lymphadenopathies were found during preoperative work-up. The technique consisted in performing the resection through the suprapubic access, using three reusable ports and reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope). An intracorporeal anastomosis using a linear stapler was performed, the mesenteric defect was closed, and the access site was finally used for specimen extraction.

Results: No additional trocars or conversion to open surgery were necessary. Laparoscopic time was 240 minutes and the final incision length was 4.5cm. Pathological data confirmed the presence of a pT1N0 colonic adenocarcinoma, with 22 negative nodes. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.

Conclusions: Suprapubic SIL is a useful technique for right hemicolectomy because the mesocolic and the mesenteric dissections are performed on the same axis as the access site. Intracorporeal anastomosis is carried out without traction, and the gravitational effect of the operating table allows to expose the operative field and to maneuver the colon and the small bowel intracorporeally. Finally, this access can be enlarged for the extraction of the specimen without cosmetic damage.
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
4632 views
44 likes
0 comments
07:18
Suprapubic single incision laparoscopic right hemicolectomy with intracorporeal anastomosis
Background: Single incision laparoscopy (SIL) has recently sparked considerable interest. The objectives of this technique are to improve cosmetic outcomes and to reduce invasiveness. Until now the umbilicus was the preferred way of entry, but suprapubic access can be an alternative especially for right hemicolectomy.

Clinical case: A 50-year-old male, without previous surgical history and a body mass index of 22 kg/m2 underwent colonoscopy due to anemia. A large base polyp was found in the right colon, and biopsy revealed a colic adenocarcinoma. No distant metastasis or lymphadenopathies were found during preoperative work-up. The technique consisted in performing the resection through the suprapubic access, using three reusable ports and reusable curved instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope). An intracorporeal anastomosis using a linear stapler was performed, the mesenteric defect was closed, and the access site was finally used for specimen extraction.

Results: No additional trocars or conversion to open surgery were necessary. Laparoscopic time was 240 minutes and the final incision length was 4.5cm. Pathological data confirmed the presence of a pT1N0 colonic adenocarcinoma, with 22 negative nodes. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 4.

Conclusions: Suprapubic SIL is a useful technique for right hemicolectomy because the mesocolic and the mesenteric dissections are performed on the same axis as the access site. Intracorporeal anastomosis is carried out without traction, and the gravitational effect of the operating table allows to expose the operative field and to maneuver the colon and the small bowel intracorporeally. Finally, this access can be enlarged for the extraction of the specimen without cosmetic damage.
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic left ovariectomy
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has been reported to be a feasible and safe procedure to treat gynecologic diseases. This video presents a left ovariectomy performed in a patient with a symptomatic giant ovarian cyst.

Clinical case: A 56-year-old female with a body mass index of 20.5 kg/m2, was consulted for abdominal pain localized in the left iliac fossa. Preoperative work-up showed a left ovarian cyst of 12cm in diameter. The cyst appeared to be round, with smooth walls, homogenic liquid, and without intracystic proliferations. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port for a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, and curved reusable instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope). The specimen was extracted through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor additional ports were necessary. The laparoscopy lasted 37 minutes and the final umbilical incision length was 15mm. Pathological data revealed a serous cystadenoma. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. At 7-month follow-up, no late complications were found and the patient was asymptomatic.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial for gynecologic diseases and this technique allow for a final scar of minimal size. The cost of the procedure is similar to that of multi-port laparoscopy.
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2968 views
33 likes
0 comments
03:46
Transumbilical single incision laparoscopic left ovariectomy
Background: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy has been reported to be a feasible and safe procedure to treat gynecologic diseases. This video presents a left ovariectomy performed in a patient with a symptomatic giant ovarian cyst.

Clinical case: A 56-year-old female with a body mass index of 20.5 kg/m2, was consulted for abdominal pain localized in the left iliac fossa. Preoperative work-up showed a left ovarian cyst of 12cm in diameter. The cyst appeared to be round, with smooth walls, homogenic liquid, and without intracystic proliferations. The procedure was performed using an 11mm reusable port for a 10mm, 30-degree standard length scope, and curved reusable instruments according to Dapri (Karl Storz Endoskope). The specimen was extracted through the umbilicus in a custom-made plastic bag.

Results: No conversion to open surgery nor additional ports were necessary. The laparoscopy lasted 37 minutes and the final umbilical incision length was 15mm. Pathological data revealed a serous cystadenoma. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 1. At 7-month follow-up, no late complications were found and the patient was asymptomatic.

Conclusions: Transumbilical single incision laparoscopy is beneficial for gynecologic diseases and this technique allow for a final scar of minimal size. The cost of the procedure is similar to that of multi-port laparoscopy.
Single incision transumbilical laparoscopic left hepatic lobectomy
Background: Single-incision laparoscopy (SIL) recently gained interest mainly to improve the cosmetic outcomes. This video shows a patient submitted to left hepatic lobectomy by transumbilical SIL.

Video: A 24 year-old woman with a BMI of 24.4 kg/m2 consulted for a hydatid cyst of the II-III hepatic segments. Preoperative work-up showed a hepatic hydatid cyst of the segment III, partially involving the segment II. A transumbilical SIL was performed using an 11mm trocar for a 10mm, standard length, 30-degree scope, and a curved grasping forceps, and Ligasure V. At the end of the resection, a custom-made plastic bag was inserted in the abdomen through the 11mm trocar, and the specimen was morcellated at the umbilicus inside it without tearing.

Results: No conversion to open surgery or additional trocars were necessary. Total operative time was 114 minutes and laparoscopic time 96 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 20mm. The patient’s pain medication could be kept low and the patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. After 6 months, the patient was well with no visible scar.

Conclusion: Left hepatic lobectomy for benign lesions can safely be performed through transumbilical SIL. In the absence of malignancy, the final incision length can be kept minimal.
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2732 views
25 likes
0 comments
05:12
Single incision transumbilical laparoscopic left hepatic lobectomy
Background: Single-incision laparoscopy (SIL) recently gained interest mainly to improve the cosmetic outcomes. This video shows a patient submitted to left hepatic lobectomy by transumbilical SIL.

Video: A 24 year-old woman with a BMI of 24.4 kg/m2 consulted for a hydatid cyst of the II-III hepatic segments. Preoperative work-up showed a hepatic hydatid cyst of the segment III, partially involving the segment II. A transumbilical SIL was performed using an 11mm trocar for a 10mm, standard length, 30-degree scope, and a curved grasping forceps, and Ligasure V. At the end of the resection, a custom-made plastic bag was inserted in the abdomen through the 11mm trocar, and the specimen was morcellated at the umbilicus inside it without tearing.

Results: No conversion to open surgery or additional trocars were necessary. Total operative time was 114 minutes and laparoscopic time 96 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 20mm. The patient’s pain medication could be kept low and the patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. After 6 months, the patient was well with no visible scar.

Conclusion: Left hepatic lobectomy for benign lesions can safely be performed through transumbilical SIL. In the absence of malignancy, the final incision length can be kept minimal.
Transumbilical single-access perforated gastric ulcer repair
Background: Single-access laparoscopy (SAL) can be proposed in patients presenting peritonitis both for diagnosis and treatment. This video shows a transumbilical SAL performed for perforated gastric ulcer.

Video: A 30 year-old woman with a body mass index of 22.9 kg/m2 was admitted to the emergency room for diffuse abdominal pain. Preoperative work-up showed a pneumoperitoneum, hence a SAL was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed using a standard 11mm reusable trocar for a 10mm, standard length, 30-degree scope, and curved reusable instruments inserted transumbilically without trocars. The cavity exploration showed a perforated gastric ulcer at the anterior surface of the prepyloric area. A suture repair, omentoplasty and lavage of the cavity was performed.

Results: No conversion to open surgery or additional trocars were necessary. Total operative time was 108 minutes and laparoscopic time 86 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 15mm. The patient’s pain medication could be kept low and the patient was allowed to be discharged on the 5th postoperative day. After 6 months, the patient was well with no visible umbilical scar.

Conclusion: Transumbilical SAL can be proposed in selected patients for suspicion of perforated gastric ulcer, with the main advantage of cosmetic result.
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
3879 views
50 likes
0 comments
05:17
Transumbilical single-access perforated gastric ulcer repair
Background: Single-access laparoscopy (SAL) can be proposed in patients presenting peritonitis both for diagnosis and treatment. This video shows a transumbilical SAL performed for perforated gastric ulcer.

Video: A 30 year-old woman with a body mass index of 22.9 kg/m2 was admitted to the emergency room for diffuse abdominal pain. Preoperative work-up showed a pneumoperitoneum, hence a SAL was proposed to the patient. The procedure was performed using a standard 11mm reusable trocar for a 10mm, standard length, 30-degree scope, and curved reusable instruments inserted transumbilically without trocars. The cavity exploration showed a perforated gastric ulcer at the anterior surface of the prepyloric area. A suture repair, omentoplasty and lavage of the cavity was performed.

Results: No conversion to open surgery or additional trocars were necessary. Total operative time was 108 minutes and laparoscopic time 86 minutes. Final umbilical incision length was 15mm. The patient’s pain medication could be kept low and the patient was allowed to be discharged on the 5th postoperative day. After 6 months, the patient was well with no visible umbilical scar.

Conclusion: Transumbilical SAL can be proposed in selected patients for suspicion of perforated gastric ulcer, with the main advantage of cosmetic result.
En bloc laparoscopic right hemicolectomy associated to atypical hepatectomy for advanced cancer of the hepatic flexure
Background: An adenocarcinoma of the hepatic colic flexure associated to liver invasion was diagnosed in a 55 year-old woman, who consulted for weight loss and anemia. The patient was submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and, after 4 cycles, an en bloc laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and atypical hepatectomy of segment VI was proposed.
Video: The surgeon stood between the patient’s legs, and the cameraman to the patient’s left. Four trocars were placed in the abdomen. The right mesocolon was opened at the root of the ileocaecal vessels, which were meticulously dissected and clipped. The arterial and venous branch of the middle colic vessels were sectioned as well. The right mesocolon was freed from the duodenum respecting Toldt’s fascia. The proximal transverse colon and the distal ileum were divided by firing of a linear stapler (purple and white loads). Peroperative ultrasonography permitted exclusion of other hepatic lesions and the delimitation of the en bloc resection of segment VI. The hepatic parenchyma was transected using the coagulating hook. A laparoscopic manual side-to-side ileocolic anastomosis by 2 runnings sutures was performed. The mesocolic defect was closed, and the specimen was retrieved through a protected suprapubic incision.
Results: Operative time was 180 minutes and estimated blood loss 150 mL. The patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. Pathology evidenced a pT4N1 colic adenocarcinoma. She underwent additional adjuvant chemotherapy, and was doing well at the time of the last office visit.
Conclusion: Advanced colic cancer associated to hepatic invasion can be safely treated by laparoscopy.
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
7150 views
41 likes
0 comments
10:17
En bloc laparoscopic right hemicolectomy associated to atypical hepatectomy for advanced cancer of the hepatic flexure
Background: An adenocarcinoma of the hepatic colic flexure associated to liver invasion was diagnosed in a 55 year-old woman, who consulted for weight loss and anemia. The patient was submitted to neoadjuvant chemotherapy and, after 4 cycles, an en bloc laparoscopic right hemicolectomy and atypical hepatectomy of segment VI was proposed.
Video: The surgeon stood between the patient’s legs, and the cameraman to the patient’s left. Four trocars were placed in the abdomen. The right mesocolon was opened at the root of the ileocaecal vessels, which were meticulously dissected and clipped. The arterial and venous branch of the middle colic vessels were sectioned as well. The right mesocolon was freed from the duodenum respecting Toldt’s fascia. The proximal transverse colon and the distal ileum were divided by firing of a linear stapler (purple and white loads). Peroperative ultrasonography permitted exclusion of other hepatic lesions and the delimitation of the en bloc resection of segment VI. The hepatic parenchyma was transected using the coagulating hook. A laparoscopic manual side-to-side ileocolic anastomosis by 2 runnings sutures was performed. The mesocolic defect was closed, and the specimen was retrieved through a protected suprapubic incision.
Results: Operative time was 180 minutes and estimated blood loss 150 mL. The patient was discharged on the 5th postoperative day. Pathology evidenced a pT4N1 colic adenocarcinoma. She underwent additional adjuvant chemotherapy, and was doing well at the time of the last office visit.
Conclusion: Advanced colic cancer associated to hepatic invasion can be safely treated by laparoscopy.