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Arnaud WATTIEZ

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Strasbourg, France
MD
19.7K likes
826.6K views
76 comments
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Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, I Argay
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
5030 views
311 likes
1 comment
42:42
Laparoscopic resection of endometriotic fibrotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels and adherent to the mid-sigmoid colon
Deep endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky surgeries. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge, and a high level of surgical competency.
This is the case of a 37-year-old lady presenting with a complex deep pelvic endometriosis. She had a long history of severe dysmenorrhea, colicky abdominal pain, back pain, and constipation. Imaging studies (MR) showed a large fibrotic endometriotic nodule extending from the posterior lateral aspect of the uterus to the left pelvic sidewall, encasing the internal iliac vessels, nerves, and adherent to a 4cm segment of the mid-sigmoid colon.
This patient has a complicated past history of left ureter ligation during a caesarean section (in 2011), which resulted in a left-sided nephrectomy in 2012. She got a pneumothorax complication, lung drainage, right-side thoracotomy in 2013, and finally a total pleurectomy in 2014.
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
A Wattiez, R Nasir, A Host
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
3790 views
161 likes
1 comment
31:22
Severe complex endometriosis with ascites: laparoscopic management
Frozen pelvis due to endometriosis is one of the most complex and risky situations which surgeons sometimes face. Its laparoscopic management requires a systematic approach, a good anatomical knowledge and a high level of surgical competency. This is a frozen pelvis case secondary to a complicated severe endometriosis in a young nulliparous lady. She had hemorrhagic abdominal ascites secondary to endometriosis, with a sub-occlusive syndrome. Her disease was further complicated with upper abdominal and pelvic fibrosis with a large umbilical endometriotic nodule as well as splenic, omental and sigmoid endometriosis. This video demonstrates the strategy of the laparoscopic management of this condition.
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.
A Wattiez, F Asencio, J Faria, I Argay, L Schwartz
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
8783 views
307 likes
0 comments
25:01
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy in case of large uterus
This video demonstrates the case of a 46-year-old patient presented with menorrhagia and anemia.
Clinical examination revealed a large mass almost reaching the level of the umbilicus.
The uterus appeared much bigger than usual on MRI, with a large myoma coming out of the pelvis.
It was decided to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy combined with bilateral salpingectomy.
This video demonstrates the appropriate strategy to safely perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy in case of large uterus, showing the appropriate surgical steps and providing safety tips. The specimen weighed more than 1kg.
Anterior and posterior laparoscopic mesh removal due to pelvic pain, subtotal hysterectomy, mesh replacement, and Burch procedure
This is the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with pelvic pain after laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. The patient has a history of one vaginal birth, laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with uterine preservation combined with a transobturator tape (TOT) sling procedure performed in 2013.
The following symptoms appeared after surgery: invalidating pelvic pain, especially in an upright position, severe terminal constipation, worsening of a previously mild stress urinary incontinence.
On clinical examination, a high rectocele (grade 2/3), a cystocele, and elective pain at the level of the TOT sling were observed. MRI revealed a perineal inflammation between the anterior aspect of the vagina and the urethra, at the level of the lower third of the urethra. A fibrotic area can be noted at the level of the rectovaginal space.
Her TOT sling was partially resected in January 2014.
Cystoscopy ruled out the presence of mesh erosion. Hysteroscopy was normal.
Endometrial biopsy demonstrated an atrophic endometrium.
In this surgery, the anterior and posterior meshes are removed. A subtotal hysterectomy combined with the replacement of meshes were performed, followed by a Burch procedure.
A Wattiez, I Argay, F Asencio, J Faria, L Schwartz
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1782 views
64 likes
1 comment
33:56
Anterior and posterior laparoscopic mesh removal due to pelvic pain, subtotal hysterectomy, mesh replacement, and Burch procedure
This is the case of a 69-year-old woman presenting with pelvic pain after laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy. The patient has a history of one vaginal birth, laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy with uterine preservation combined with a transobturator tape (TOT) sling procedure performed in 2013.
The following symptoms appeared after surgery: invalidating pelvic pain, especially in an upright position, severe terminal constipation, worsening of a previously mild stress urinary incontinence.
On clinical examination, a high rectocele (grade 2/3), a cystocele, and elective pain at the level of the TOT sling were observed. MRI revealed a perineal inflammation between the anterior aspect of the vagina and the urethra, at the level of the lower third of the urethra. A fibrotic area can be noted at the level of the rectovaginal space.
Her TOT sling was partially resected in January 2014.
Cystoscopy ruled out the presence of mesh erosion. Hysteroscopy was normal.
Endometrial biopsy demonstrated an atrophic endometrium.
In this surgery, the anterior and posterior meshes are removed. A subtotal hysterectomy combined with the replacement of meshes were performed, followed by a Burch procedure.
Laparoscopic type C radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer
This video shows a standardized and reproducible approach to radical hysterectomy. The procedure begins with the dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the paracervix. After coagulation and division of the round ligament, the surgeon performs a T-shape incision until the psoas muscles to expose the field for the ilio-obturator lymphadenectomy. The paravesical fossa is then dissected in its medial and lateral aspect using the umbilical artery as a landmark. Following the umbilical artery in a ventral to dorsal direction, the surgeon identifies the uterine artery and the paracervix. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the paracervix, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the Latzko and Okabayashi spaces in order to isolate the paracervix. Once the spaces have been developed, the lymphadenectomy is performed separating the external iliac vessels from the psoas muscle to reach the obturator fossa. During this step, the obturator nerve is identified to avoid injuries and to mark the caudal limit of the lymphadenectomy.
The procedure is carried on with the isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the paracervix and the bladder. To do so, the bladder pillar is identified and the dissection is pursued between its medial and lateral aspect developing the so-called space of Yabuki. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The paracervix is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel and the ureter is unroofed.
The vagina is cut with monopolar energy using a vaginal valve as a guide and the specimen is extracted vaginally.
The vagina is closed with three stitches using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
G Centini, K Afors, J Castellano, C Meza Paul, R Murtada, A Wattiez
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
10362 views
344 likes
1 comment
07:20
Laparoscopic type C radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for cervical cancer
This video shows a standardized and reproducible approach to radical hysterectomy. The procedure begins with the dissection of the lateral pelvic spaces in order to identify and isolate the paracervix. After coagulation and division of the round ligament, the surgeon performs a T-shape incision until the psoas muscles to expose the field for the ilio-obturator lymphadenectomy. The paravesical fossa is then dissected in its medial and lateral aspect using the umbilical artery as a landmark. Following the umbilical artery in a ventral to dorsal direction, the surgeon identifies the uterine artery and the paracervix. Using the uterine artery as a landmark of the paracervix, dissection is continued posteriorly developing the Latzko and Okabayashi spaces in order to isolate the paracervix. Once the spaces have been developed, the lymphadenectomy is performed separating the external iliac vessels from the psoas muscle to reach the obturator fossa. During this step, the obturator nerve is identified to avoid injuries and to mark the caudal limit of the lymphadenectomy.
The procedure is carried on with the isolation of the ureter in its anterior aspect between the paracervix and the bladder. To do so, the bladder pillar is identified and the dissection is pursued between its medial and lateral aspect developing the so-called space of Yabuki. The bladder pillar is then transected at the level of the bladder. The rectal pillar is transected at the level of the rectum paying attention to isolate the inferior hypogastric nerve. The paracervix is then cut at the level of the hypogastric vessel and the ureter is unroofed.
The vagina is cut with monopolar energy using a vaginal valve as a guide and the specimen is extracted vaginally.
The vagina is closed with three stitches using an extracorporeal knotting technique.
Management of a severe bleeding during laparoscopy for recurrent rectovaginal endometriosis
This case demonstrates the potential danger of a repetitive surgery after an incomplete resection of rectovaginal endometriosis. A severe bleeding occurred during the dissection of the recurrent nodule. It was managed through multiple coagulations, which could only be performed safely and effectively because important landmarks had been identified and retracted prior to resecting the nodule. A key point in the surgery was also circumventing the nodule in order to pass in sano as the bleeding came from vessels entrapped in fibrosis and scarring tissue which could not be effectively coagulated.
A Wattiez, R Murtada, G Centini, R Fernandes, K Afors, C Meza Paul, J Castellano
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3137 views
59 likes
0 comments
08:06
Management of a severe bleeding during laparoscopy for recurrent rectovaginal endometriosis
This case demonstrates the potential danger of a repetitive surgery after an incomplete resection of rectovaginal endometriosis. A severe bleeding occurred during the dissection of the recurrent nodule. It was managed through multiple coagulations, which could only be performed safely and effectively because important landmarks had been identified and retracted prior to resecting the nodule. A key point in the surgery was also circumventing the nodule in order to pass in sano as the bleeding came from vessels entrapped in fibrosis and scarring tissue which could not be effectively coagulated.
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, C Meza Paul, K Afors, J Castellano, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1872 views
46 likes
0 comments
38:15
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
Laparoscopic Burch procedure: colposuspension for stress urinary incontinence (SUI)
We present the case of a 53-year old patient diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), who was initially managed by a tension-free vaginal tape obturator system (TVTO) operation one year earlier. Six months after the initial procedure, she reported a recurrence of her urinary symptoms. She was referred to our department and a urodynamic investigation revealed a type II SUI.

Decision is made to perform a laparoscopic Burch colposuspension to reinforce the urethral support. This procedure can be considered a therapeutic option in patients with recurrent symptoms of SUI following vaginal sling procedures.
A Wattiez, J Castellano, C Meza Paul, K Afors, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3559 views
112 likes
0 comments
13:33
Laparoscopic Burch procedure: colposuspension for stress urinary incontinence (SUI)
We present the case of a 53-year old patient diagnosed with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), who was initially managed by a tension-free vaginal tape obturator system (TVTO) operation one year earlier. Six months after the initial procedure, she reported a recurrence of her urinary symptoms. She was referred to our department and a urodynamic investigation revealed a type II SUI.

Decision is made to perform a laparoscopic Burch colposuspension to reinforce the urethral support. This procedure can be considered a therapeutic option in patients with recurrent symptoms of SUI following vaginal sling procedures.
Bowel obstruction: a late complication after laparoscopic colposacropexy
This video illustrates the case of a patient with bowel adherent to an exposed portion of mesh used for treatment of a previous apical prolapse. The patient presents with abdominal symptoms following a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy.
In this video, Professor Wattiez performs an extensive pelvic adhesiolysis, detaching the bowel from the mesh, and identifying adequate correction of vaginal prolapse, without any sign of infection. Reperitonization of the vaginal vault and the long arm (sacrum arm) of the mesh was also performed.
This unique case highlights the importance of peritonization when using mesh. Complications such as mesh exposure may occur, however this can be appropriately managed laparoscopically.
A Wattiez, J Castellano, R Fernandes, G Centini, C Meza Paul, K Afors
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1812 views
37 likes
0 comments
23:25
Bowel obstruction: a late complication after laparoscopic colposacropexy
This video illustrates the case of a patient with bowel adherent to an exposed portion of mesh used for treatment of a previous apical prolapse. The patient presents with abdominal symptoms following a laparoscopic sacrocolpopexy.
In this video, Professor Wattiez performs an extensive pelvic adhesiolysis, detaching the bowel from the mesh, and identifying adequate correction of vaginal prolapse, without any sign of infection. Reperitonization of the vaginal vault and the long arm (sacrum arm) of the mesh was also performed.
This unique case highlights the importance of peritonization when using mesh. Complications such as mesh exposure may occur, however this can be appropriately managed laparoscopically.
Laparoscopic treatment of a deep endometriotic nodule in the ischiatic tuberosity
In this challenging surgery performed by Professor Arnaud Wattiez, we present the case of a 39-year-old woman suffering from deep infiltrating endometriosis and infertility with no previous surgeries. The patient presented with chronic pelvic pain, dyschezia, and dyspareunia. Preoperative workup included MRI and rectosigmoidoscopy. MRI revealed a nodule at the level of the right uterosacral ligament. Rectosigmoidoscopy revealed a bulging of the anterior rectal wall located at 6cm from the anal verge where biopsy revealed fibrosis. The patient’s physical examination demonstrated the presence of a retrouterine nodule at the site of the right uterosacral ligament measuring 3cm.
A Wattiez, R Fernandes, M Puga, J Alves, C Redondo Guisasola
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2010 views
35 likes
0 comments
03:00
Laparoscopic treatment of a deep endometriotic nodule in the ischiatic tuberosity
In this challenging surgery performed by Professor Arnaud Wattiez, we present the case of a 39-year-old woman suffering from deep infiltrating endometriosis and infertility with no previous surgeries. The patient presented with chronic pelvic pain, dyschezia, and dyspareunia. Preoperative workup included MRI and rectosigmoidoscopy. MRI revealed a nodule at the level of the right uterosacral ligament. Rectosigmoidoscopy revealed a bulging of the anterior rectal wall located at 6cm from the anal verge where biopsy revealed fibrosis. The patient’s physical examination demonstrated the presence of a retrouterine nodule at the site of the right uterosacral ligament measuring 3cm.
Gynecological cancer and laparoscopic approach: state-of-the-art
In this key lecture, Professor Wattiez introduces the history of laparoscopy applied to oncology. The feasibility, accuracy, radicality, and benefits of laparoscopy applied to cancer are addressed. The lack of expansion of laparoscopy used in oncology is explained. Adverse effects and controversies such as port-site metastases as well as their prevention are exposed. Recent data are presented and complications between laparoscopy and laparotomy are outlined, showing no complications related to laparoscopy. Exposure and dissection, which are important steps in order to prevent complications, are explained. To conclude, a take home message emphasizing the importance of training is given.
A Wattiez
Lecture
5 years ago
1418 views
16 likes
0 comments
45:15
Gynecological cancer and laparoscopic approach: state-of-the-art
In this key lecture, Professor Wattiez introduces the history of laparoscopy applied to oncology. The feasibility, accuracy, radicality, and benefits of laparoscopy applied to cancer are addressed. The lack of expansion of laparoscopy used in oncology is explained. Adverse effects and controversies such as port-site metastases as well as their prevention are exposed. Recent data are presented and complications between laparoscopy and laparotomy are outlined, showing no complications related to laparoscopy. Exposure and dissection, which are important steps in order to prevent complications, are explained. To conclude, a take home message emphasizing the importance of training is given.
Laparoscopic oophorectomy for solid ovarian mass
We present the case of a 28-year-old woman with no relevant previous surgical or medical history. The patient was addressed for the removal of a right ovarian mass. She presented with dysmenorrhea and occasional dyspareunia. There were no other symptoms. Her physical examination showed a right adnexal mass to the vaginal touch. Preoperative work-up included a pelvic ultrasound, which showed a tumor apparently originating from the right ovary, of solid homogeneous appearance. MRI confirmed the presence of the solid mass, measuring approximately 6cm. No other pathological findings were present in the rest of the abdominal cavity. Tumor markers were negative. The patient had not completed childbearing and desired a conservative surgical approach. The different aspects of the surgical management were explained, including the possibility of performing an oophorectomy if no healthy ovarian tissue could be identified.
A Wattiez, C Redondo Guisasola, M Puga, R Fernandes, J Alves
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
5160 views
83 likes
1 comment
08:33
Laparoscopic oophorectomy for solid ovarian mass
We present the case of a 28-year-old woman with no relevant previous surgical or medical history. The patient was addressed for the removal of a right ovarian mass. She presented with dysmenorrhea and occasional dyspareunia. There were no other symptoms. Her physical examination showed a right adnexal mass to the vaginal touch. Preoperative work-up included a pelvic ultrasound, which showed a tumor apparently originating from the right ovary, of solid homogeneous appearance. MRI confirmed the presence of the solid mass, measuring approximately 6cm. No other pathological findings were present in the rest of the abdominal cavity. Tumor markers were negative. The patient had not completed childbearing and desired a conservative surgical approach. The different aspects of the surgical management were explained, including the possibility of performing an oophorectomy if no healthy ovarian tissue could be identified.
Laparoscopic segmental resection in a patient with deep infiltrating endometriosis
We present the case of a 33-year-old-woman suffering from deep infiltrating endometriosis. In her previous history, three laparoscopies had been performed due to endometriosis. In the first two laparoscopies, bilateral ovarian cystectomies had been carried out while the third laparoscopy had been indicated to puncture the ovaries after hormonal stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF), due to the impossibility of reaching follicles transvaginally.
The patient presented with dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia, as well as rectorrhagia and diarrhea. The patient’s physical examination demonstrated the presence of a retrouterine mass suggestive of adhesions. Preoperative work-up included MRI and colonoscopy. MRI showed an endometriotic nodule affecting the rectosigmoid junction and infiltrating its wall. A colonoscopy was performed and allowed to visualize the endometriotic nodule.
A Wattiez, C Redondo Guisasola, M Puga, J Alves, R Fernandes
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2610 views
30 likes
0 comments
18:50
Laparoscopic segmental resection in a patient with deep infiltrating endometriosis
We present the case of a 33-year-old-woman suffering from deep infiltrating endometriosis. In her previous history, three laparoscopies had been performed due to endometriosis. In the first two laparoscopies, bilateral ovarian cystectomies had been carried out while the third laparoscopy had been indicated to puncture the ovaries after hormonal stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF), due to the impossibility of reaching follicles transvaginally.
The patient presented with dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia, as well as rectorrhagia and diarrhea. The patient’s physical examination demonstrated the presence of a retrouterine mass suggestive of adhesions. Preoperative work-up included MRI and colonoscopy. MRI showed an endometriotic nodule affecting the rectosigmoid junction and infiltrating its wall. A colonoscopy was performed and allowed to visualize the endometriotic nodule.
Laparoscopic colposacropexy for the treatment of an apical defect in a patient with previous total hysterectomy
We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who suffered from an elytrocele. Previously, she had undergone a total hysterectomy with anterior and posterior colpoperineoplasty due to the presence of a grade 2 cystocele, without urinary incontinence. The management of genital prolapse requires a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the female pelvic floor. This video outlines the main steps to follow for the repair of an apical defect with no true rectocele or cystocele. It also offers a very good insight of the specific issues to be considered when performing dissection and mesh fixation in specific situations, such as distortion of the normal anatomy due to the scarring process from a previous surgery and obesity. This surgery was performed and streamed live.
A Wattiez, C Redondo Guisasola, M Puga, F Asencio
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
4407 views
77 likes
0 comments
18:00
Laparoscopic colposacropexy for the treatment of an apical defect in a patient with previous total hysterectomy
We present the case of a 69-year-old patient who suffered from an elytrocele. Previously, she had undergone a total hysterectomy with anterior and posterior colpoperineoplasty due to the presence of a grade 2 cystocele, without urinary incontinence. The management of genital prolapse requires a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the female pelvic floor. This video outlines the main steps to follow for the repair of an apical defect with no true rectocele or cystocele. It also offers a very good insight of the specific issues to be considered when performing dissection and mesh fixation in specific situations, such as distortion of the normal anatomy due to the scarring process from a previous surgery and obesity. This surgery was performed and streamed live.
Lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy: improving exposure with the T’lift™ device
Lymph node dissection in the lumbo-aortic area is a challenging procedure. The main concerns during surgery include the risk of major vascular injury and the potential lesion of other structures such as the ureter or the duodenum. A thorough surgical strategy and adequate exposure are mandatory to reduce the possibility of complications.
During this surgical demonstration, the most important aspects of the strategy are discussed. Special emphasis is put on exposure and the use of the T’lift™ device is shown. This simple technique allows for a fast and safe suspension of the peritoneum, improving the visualization of the operative field.
A Wattiez, M Puga, CY Akladios, C Redondo Guisasola, Al Ussia
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
4232 views
59 likes
0 comments
15:01
Lumbo-aortic lymphadenectomy: improving exposure with the T’lift™ device
Lymph node dissection in the lumbo-aortic area is a challenging procedure. The main concerns during surgery include the risk of major vascular injury and the potential lesion of other structures such as the ureter or the duodenum. A thorough surgical strategy and adequate exposure are mandatory to reduce the possibility of complications.
During this surgical demonstration, the most important aspects of the strategy are discussed. Special emphasis is put on exposure and the use of the T’lift™ device is shown. This simple technique allows for a fast and safe suspension of the peritoneum, improving the visualization of the operative field.
How to improve exposure in laparoscopy: organ suspension with the T-Lift™ device
Organ suspension using a T-lift™ device is a simple method to enhance exposure in laparoscopic surgery, providing adequate vision and operating space and allowing the assistant to focus on helping the surgeon, thus reducing operative times, without the need for difficult intra-abdominal needle manipulation as well as the risk of bowel and vascular injury associated with that approach.
Several examples of organ suspension with the T-lift™ are demonstrated in this video, including suspension of the ovaries, sigmoid colon or vagina in simple procedures, as well as in more complex procedures, for instance by holding the anterior rectal wall for bowel resection with transanal specimen extraction.
A Wattiez, J Albornoz, E Faller, M Puga
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
7383 views
466 likes
1 comment
07:12
How to improve exposure in laparoscopy: organ suspension with the T-Lift™ device
Organ suspension using a T-lift™ device is a simple method to enhance exposure in laparoscopic surgery, providing adequate vision and operating space and allowing the assistant to focus on helping the surgeon, thus reducing operative times, without the need for difficult intra-abdominal needle manipulation as well as the risk of bowel and vascular injury associated with that approach.
Several examples of organ suspension with the T-lift™ are demonstrated in this video, including suspension of the ovaries, sigmoid colon or vagina in simple procedures, as well as in more complex procedures, for instance by holding the anterior rectal wall for bowel resection with transanal specimen extraction.
Laparoscopic rectovaginal resection for endometriosis: transvaginal specimen extraction and anastomosis
The authors demonstrate a rectovaginal resection technique for invasive endometriosis. The original nature of this approach hinges on the mesorectum dissection technique in contact with the rectal wall in order to preserve rectal vascularization and innervation. Additionally, rectal exteriorization through the vagina to prepare for the colorectal anastomosis using a mechanical circular stapling without any abdominal incision is truly original as it contributes to limiting parietal trauma and improving cosmesis. The film truly focuses on the digestive approach just after anterior pelvic dissection has been completed by the team of gynecologic surgeons.
J Leroy, CY Akladios, V Thoma, A Wattiez, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1337 views
23 likes
0 comments
21:33
Laparoscopic rectovaginal resection for endometriosis: transvaginal specimen extraction and anastomosis
The authors demonstrate a rectovaginal resection technique for invasive endometriosis. The original nature of this approach hinges on the mesorectum dissection technique in contact with the rectal wall in order to preserve rectal vascularization and innervation. Additionally, rectal exteriorization through the vagina to prepare for the colorectal anastomosis using a mechanical circular stapling without any abdominal incision is truly original as it contributes to limiting parietal trauma and improving cosmesis. The film truly focuses on the digestive approach just after anterior pelvic dissection has been completed by the team of gynecologic surgeons.
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for big bladder endometriosis nodule
Bladder endometriosis is the most common presentation of urinary tract endometriosis and is frequently associated with specific symptoms such as dysuria, hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Although it may be associated with ureteral endometriosis in severe cases, in most cases, it presents as an isolated disease.
The laparoscopic approach for bladder endometriosis nodule excision requires careful dissection of the paravesical spaces and identification of both ureters entering each ureteral tunnel. The shaving technique until healthy tissue is reached should be attempted, but if mucosal invasion is found, complete wall excision should be performed. In some occasions, when the nodule invades the bladder trigone, a double-J catheter may be inserted and left in place for 6 to 8 weeks.
In this video, we present the case of a 23-year-old woman complaining with significant dysuria associated with hematuria, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and chronic pelvic pain. Magnetic resonance imaging described a 5cm nodule located in the bladder dome, and cystoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was referred to our Endometriosis Centre after diagnostic laparoscopy.
A Wattiez, J Albornoz, M Puga, E Faller
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1738 views
24 likes
0 comments
32:41
Laparoscopic partial cystectomy for big bladder endometriosis nodule
Bladder endometriosis is the most common presentation of urinary tract endometriosis and is frequently associated with specific symptoms such as dysuria, hematuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Although it may be associated with ureteral endometriosis in severe cases, in most cases, it presents as an isolated disease.
The laparoscopic approach for bladder endometriosis nodule excision requires careful dissection of the paravesical spaces and identification of both ureters entering each ureteral tunnel. The shaving technique until healthy tissue is reached should be attempted, but if mucosal invasion is found, complete wall excision should be performed. In some occasions, when the nodule invades the bladder trigone, a double-J catheter may be inserted and left in place for 6 to 8 weeks.
In this video, we present the case of a 23-year-old woman complaining with significant dysuria associated with hematuria, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, and chronic pelvic pain. Magnetic resonance imaging described a 5cm nodule located in the bladder dome, and cystoscopy confirmed the diagnosis. The patient was referred to our Endometriosis Centre after diagnostic laparoscopy.
Segmental bowel resection and transanal specimen extraction for Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis (DIE)
Endometriosis can affect the bowel in 5-15% of cases and the most common sites are the rectum, the sigmoid colon, the appendix, and the small bowel. Patients may present dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and chronic pelvic pain, as well as digestive symptoms such as dyschezia, constipation and diarrhea during menstruation. Preoperative work-up includes transanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, which according to the nodule’s location, can accurately describe the lesions. The laparoscopic approach includes adhesiolysis (shaving), partial thickness wall excision (mucosal skinning), discoid resection, and segmental bowel resection. In this video, we present the case of a 30-year-old patient complaining from severe dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia associated with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) of the sigmoid colon that was treated by means of nodule excision, segmental bowel resection, and transanal specimen extraction.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, J Albornoz, E Faller, M Puga
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2425 views
15 likes
0 comments
10:12
Segmental bowel resection and transanal specimen extraction for Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis (DIE)
Endometriosis can affect the bowel in 5-15% of cases and the most common sites are the rectum, the sigmoid colon, the appendix, and the small bowel. Patients may present dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and chronic pelvic pain, as well as digestive symptoms such as dyschezia, constipation and diarrhea during menstruation. Preoperative work-up includes transanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, which according to the nodule’s location, can accurately describe the lesions. The laparoscopic approach includes adhesiolysis (shaving), partial thickness wall excision (mucosal skinning), discoid resection, and segmental bowel resection. In this video, we present the case of a 30-year-old patient complaining from severe dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia associated with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) of the sigmoid colon that was treated by means of nodule excision, segmental bowel resection, and transanal specimen extraction.
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy with a big adnexal mass
Hysterectomy when managing a big adnexal mass has always been a challenging situation for laparoscopic surgeons. Complete preoperative assessment, surgical experience and strategy are fundamental to address adnexal pathology laparoscopicallly, both for benign and malignant conditions. Adequate trocar placement, full inspection of the abdominal cavity, comprehensive evaluation of the tumor’s surface, cytology and definition of the nature of the adnexal mass are truly essential. In addition, proper identification of standard anatomical landmarks is fundamental to perform hysterectomy with adnexectomy, which helps to prevent damage to surrounding structures. Final assessment of the vaginal cuff may lead to the diagnosis of pelvic floor disorders that should be repaired during vaginal cuff closure. In this video, we present a case of hysterectomy and adnexectomy by laparoscopy in a 46-year-old patient complaining of abdominal pain secondary to the presence of a 13cm simple adnexal cyst with normal CA 125 values.
A Wattiez, C Zacharopoulou, J Albornoz, M Puga, E Faller
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
4659 views
137 likes
0 comments
28:57
Strategy for laparoscopic total hysterectomy with a big adnexal mass
Hysterectomy when managing a big adnexal mass has always been a challenging situation for laparoscopic surgeons. Complete preoperative assessment, surgical experience and strategy are fundamental to address adnexal pathology laparoscopicallly, both for benign and malignant conditions. Adequate trocar placement, full inspection of the abdominal cavity, comprehensive evaluation of the tumor’s surface, cytology and definition of the nature of the adnexal mass are truly essential. In addition, proper identification of standard anatomical landmarks is fundamental to perform hysterectomy with adnexectomy, which helps to prevent damage to surrounding structures. Final assessment of the vaginal cuff may lead to the diagnosis of pelvic floor disorders that should be repaired during vaginal cuff closure. In this video, we present a case of hysterectomy and adnexectomy by laparoscopy in a 46-year-old patient complaining of abdominal pain secondary to the presence of a 13cm simple adnexal cyst with normal CA 125 values.
Mucosal skinning for bowel endometriosis: standard technique
Bowel endometriosis is described in 3% to 37% of patients with endometriosis. In 90% of these cases, the rectum, the sigmoid colon or both are involved. It is the most severe form of the disease and its surgical management is complex. Surgery is very challenging and the degree of radical excision should always be counterbalanced with the risk of complications and functional disorders. Four types of surgery can be chosen: superficial excision or shaving, mucosal skinning, discoid excision, and segmental bowel resection. We believe that bowel resection can be avoided in some cases if mucosal skinning is first attempted. This video shows 2 endometriotic lesions of the rectosigmoid junction that were treated by mucosal skinning, hence avoiding an unnecessary segmental resection. The final result was satisfactory and postoperative outcome was uneventful. In 2008, the patient underwent a laparoscopic intervention, which revealed the presence of a deep infiltrating endometriosis and bilateral endometriotic cysts. Bilateral ovarian cystectomy was performed. Postoperative MRI for pelvic pains revealed a persistent lesion of the recto-vaginal septum. The patient then presented with persistent dysmenorrhea (8/10), chronic pelvic pain (8/10), dyschezia (6/10) without dyspareunia or bladder-related symptoms. Clinical examination showed a mobile anteverted uterus without clear evidence of a nodule lesion at the rectovaginal septum neither was it at the level of uterosacral ligaments, but most probably the presence of adhesions between the uterus and the rectosigmoid junction. Despite treatment with GnRH agonist, the patient was referred to the emergency department several times for bouts of intense pain.
A Wattiez, E Faller, J Albornoz, P Messori, T Boisramé
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1451 views
75 likes
0 comments
11:40
Mucosal skinning for bowel endometriosis: standard technique
Bowel endometriosis is described in 3% to 37% of patients with endometriosis. In 90% of these cases, the rectum, the sigmoid colon or both are involved. It is the most severe form of the disease and its surgical management is complex. Surgery is very challenging and the degree of radical excision should always be counterbalanced with the risk of complications and functional disorders. Four types of surgery can be chosen: superficial excision or shaving, mucosal skinning, discoid excision, and segmental bowel resection. We believe that bowel resection can be avoided in some cases if mucosal skinning is first attempted. This video shows 2 endometriotic lesions of the rectosigmoid junction that were treated by mucosal skinning, hence avoiding an unnecessary segmental resection. The final result was satisfactory and postoperative outcome was uneventful. In 2008, the patient underwent a laparoscopic intervention, which revealed the presence of a deep infiltrating endometriosis and bilateral endometriotic cysts. Bilateral ovarian cystectomy was performed. Postoperative MRI for pelvic pains revealed a persistent lesion of the recto-vaginal septum. The patient then presented with persistent dysmenorrhea (8/10), chronic pelvic pain (8/10), dyschezia (6/10) without dyspareunia or bladder-related symptoms. Clinical examination showed a mobile anteverted uterus without clear evidence of a nodule lesion at the rectovaginal septum neither was it at the level of uterosacral ligaments, but most probably the presence of adhesions between the uterus and the rectosigmoid junction. Despite treatment with GnRH agonist, the patient was referred to the emergency department several times for bouts of intense pain.
Understanding laparoscopy
Over the last twenty years gynecologic laparoscopy has not developed as expected, and it is mainly due to the difficulty of the technique, and the amount of time needed to perform it. Laparoscopy was initially criticized because of its technical difficulty and low productivity in comparison with vaginal approaches and laparotomies, but today its benefits include less pain, shorter hospital stay and faster recovery. From a technical standpoint, the benefits of laparoscopy include high definition vision and image magnification, which are of great value if the surgeon understands the technique, masters ergonomics and develops surgical strategies and protocols. Subsequently, a good way to improve one’s skills is to follow continuing education and training programs, and respect the three basic rules of laparoscopy: a good exposure by means of suspension techniques and Trendelenburg position, to achieve good vision and to improve surgical performance; a balanced use of irrigation to prevent anatomical distortion; and concentrate on monitors at all times.
A Wattiez
Lecture
7 years ago
12805 views
501 likes
3 comments
59:38
Understanding laparoscopy
Over the last twenty years gynecologic laparoscopy has not developed as expected, and it is mainly due to the difficulty of the technique, and the amount of time needed to perform it. Laparoscopy was initially criticized because of its technical difficulty and low productivity in comparison with vaginal approaches and laparotomies, but today its benefits include less pain, shorter hospital stay and faster recovery. From a technical standpoint, the benefits of laparoscopy include high definition vision and image magnification, which are of great value if the surgeon understands the technique, masters ergonomics and develops surgical strategies and protocols. Subsequently, a good way to improve one’s skills is to follow continuing education and training programs, and respect the three basic rules of laparoscopy: a good exposure by means of suspension techniques and Trendelenburg position, to achieve good vision and to improve surgical performance; a balanced use of irrigation to prevent anatomical distortion; and concentrate on monitors at all times.