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Joël LEROY

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Strasbourg, France
MD, FRCS
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1267742 views
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Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
J Leroy, HA Mercoli, S Tzedakis, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2089 views
98 likes
0 comments
10:54
Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
J Leroy, A D'Urso, H Jeddou, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1923 views
60 likes
1 comment
07:01
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
Laparoscopic management of a type III Mirizzi syndrome: cholecystectomy with flag technique and ideal suture of a cholecystobiliary fistula
In this video, authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a Mirizzi syndrome. Due to a cholecystocholedochal fistula and to a difficult dissection of Calot’s triangle, authors decided to modify the dissection technique by performing a primary freeing of the gallblader as described by Jean Mouiel. In order to prevent any further biliary damage, a subtotal cholecystectomy is also achieved by means of an EndoGia™ linear stapler. Cholecystobiliary fistula is repaired using an absorbable running suture protected by an internal choledochal drain placed thanks to preoperative endoscopic catheterization.
HA Mercoli, L Marx, J Leroy, P Pessaux, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
5573 views
172 likes
0 comments
07:11
Laparoscopic management of a type III Mirizzi syndrome: cholecystectomy with flag technique and ideal suture of a cholecystobiliary fistula
In this video, authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a Mirizzi syndrome. Due to a cholecystocholedochal fistula and to a difficult dissection of Calot’s triangle, authors decided to modify the dissection technique by performing a primary freeing of the gallblader as described by Jean Mouiel. In order to prevent any further biliary damage, a subtotal cholecystectomy is also achieved by means of an EndoGia™ linear stapler. Cholecystobiliary fistula is repaired using an absorbable running suture protected by an internal choledochal drain placed thanks to preoperative endoscopic catheterization.
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, C Meza Paul, K Afors, J Castellano, G Centini, R Fernandes, R Murtada
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1818 views
45 likes
0 comments
38:15
Laparoscopic ileocaecal and sigmoid resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) for endometriosis
In 12 to 30% of endometriosis cases, the disease is located in the bowel. Caecum and small bowel endometriosis are found in only 3.6% and 7% respectively of those cases while the sigmoid colon and the rectum are most commonly affected in 85% of cases. The laparoscopic management of this disease has evolved drastically over the last decade, and even delicate cases such as small bowel endometriosis can be completely managed by laparoscopy. It is key to be locally invasive towards the disease but conservative with regards to organ function preservation. The specimen will be extracted through natural orifices and without any ileostomy. Our patients are commonly young and healthy women who will certainly benefit from a tailored surgery with immediate symptom relief in addition to minimum abdominal scarring can have a significant positive impact on patient’s psychological well-being and subsequent recovery.
In the present case, we present a 36-year old woman who was diagnosed with endometriosis and presented with 3 episodes of bowel pseudo-obstruction and dyschezia, and put under medical treatment. She was found to have multiple endometriotic nodules, with concurrent ileocaecal and rectosigmoid disease, for which a double bowel resection with transanal natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE) was performed without complications.
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for benign diverticular disease
Dr. Armando Melani beautifully demonstrates a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy technique for a benign diverticular condition. He provides tips and tricks to perfectly expose the operating field and recommends an extensive approach to the left colon with primary mobilization of the splenic flexure using a posterior medial approach with a late vascular approach. The technique and its performance is amply discussed by the panel of experts present, hence providing a very instructive demonstration.
The operator also discusses the different types of energy devices available as well as the tricks to safely perform an upper colorectal anastomosis. This film provides plenty of detailed information for beginners and experts alike to allow them to perform a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a perfect fashion.
J Leroy, A Melani, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
5760 views
137 likes
3 comments
33:07
Laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for benign diverticular disease
Dr. Armando Melani beautifully demonstrates a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy technique for a benign diverticular condition. He provides tips and tricks to perfectly expose the operating field and recommends an extensive approach to the left colon with primary mobilization of the splenic flexure using a posterior medial approach with a late vascular approach. The technique and its performance is amply discussed by the panel of experts present, hence providing a very instructive demonstration.
The operator also discusses the different types of energy devices available as well as the tricks to safely perform an upper colorectal anastomosis. This film provides plenty of detailed information for beginners and experts alike to allow them to perform a laparoscopic sigmoidectomy in a perfect fashion.
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3962 views
108 likes
0 comments
11:09
Colonic stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia: laparoscopic Sugarbaker repair procedure
The objective of this film is to demonstrate stoma prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia repair according to the technique described by Sugarbaker in open surgery, reproduced here with a laparoscopic approach.
Mesh placement into the abdominal cavity presents a risk that seems minimized by the development of dual-sided composite meshes, with one collagen coating that will be in contact with the digestive tract, hence limiting the risk of adhesions.
The principle of the Sugarbaker technique is to create a colonic zigzag route and to fix it on the non-absorbable side of the mesh, thereby preventing colonic prolapse. The mesh is also used as an obstacle to the passage of small bowel loops into the parastomal defect.
Here, the difficulty lies in the combined presence of an incisional hernia and prolapse on a diverting transverse colostomy. The risk of vascular injury is all the more important. Here, authors highlight pitfalls as well as tips and tricks to overcome them.
Incisional hernia: laparoscopic hybrid repair
About 10% of laparotomies are complicated by the development of incisional hernia (1). The prosthetic repair is the rule in the treatment of incisional hernia and is reported to have a lower recurrence rate than primary suture repair (2). The laparoscopic approach proposed since the early nineties with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair has gained popularity over years. The IPOM technique is easy in case of midline incisional hernia but is more complex in case of lateral suprailiac hernia. The laparoscopic repair is associated with fewer infections as compared to the open technique (3). There are only very few reports on laparoscopic-endoscopic sublay mesh repair of abdominal wall hernias (4, 5).
We present the case of a 66-year-old patient admitted for an incisional hernia subsequent to an open liver resection for gallbladder carcinoma in 2011. The patient developed a symptomatic lateral incisional hernia in the right side of his subcostal incision. The oncologic preoperative work-up was negative. The patient was scheduled for a laparoscopic approach with a hybrid onlay and sublay mesh repair.
Here, authors aim to propose an original technique with a combined onlay and sublay approach to this complicated lateral abdominal incisional hernia.
Bibliographic references:
1. Mudge M, Hughes LE. Incisional hernia: a 10-year prospective study of incidence and attitudes. Br J Surg 1985;72:70-1.
2. Burger JW, Luijendijk RW, Hop WC, Halm JA, Verdaasdonk EG, Jeekel J. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of suture versus mesh repair of incisional hernia. Ann Surg 2004;240:578-83.
3. Sauerland S, Walgenbach M, Habermalz B, Seiler CM, Miserez M. Laparoscopic versus open surgical techniques for ventral or incisional hernia repair. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011;3:CD007781.
4. Schroeder AD, Debus ES, Schroeder M, Reinpold WM. Laparoscopic transperitoneal sublay mesh repair: a new technique for the cure of ventral and incisional hernias. Surg Endosc. 2013;27:648-54.
5. Miserez M, Penninckx F. Endoscopic totally preperitoneal ventral hernia repair. Surg Endosc 2002;16:1207-13.
A D'Urso, J Leroy, T Piardi, P Pessaux, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3540 views
54 likes
0 comments
07:27
Incisional hernia: laparoscopic hybrid repair
About 10% of laparotomies are complicated by the development of incisional hernia (1). The prosthetic repair is the rule in the treatment of incisional hernia and is reported to have a lower recurrence rate than primary suture repair (2). The laparoscopic approach proposed since the early nineties with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair has gained popularity over years. The IPOM technique is easy in case of midline incisional hernia but is more complex in case of lateral suprailiac hernia. The laparoscopic repair is associated with fewer infections as compared to the open technique (3). There are only very few reports on laparoscopic-endoscopic sublay mesh repair of abdominal wall hernias (4, 5).
We present the case of a 66-year-old patient admitted for an incisional hernia subsequent to an open liver resection for gallbladder carcinoma in 2011. The patient developed a symptomatic lateral incisional hernia in the right side of his subcostal incision. The oncologic preoperative work-up was negative. The patient was scheduled for a laparoscopic approach with a hybrid onlay and sublay mesh repair.
Here, authors aim to propose an original technique with a combined onlay and sublay approach to this complicated lateral abdominal incisional hernia.
Bibliographic references:
1. Mudge M, Hughes LE. Incisional hernia: a 10-year prospective study of incidence and attitudes. Br J Surg 1985;72:70-1.
2. Burger JW, Luijendijk RW, Hop WC, Halm JA, Verdaasdonk EG, Jeekel J. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of suture versus mesh repair of incisional hernia. Ann Surg 2004;240:578-83.
3. Sauerland S, Walgenbach M, Habermalz B, Seiler CM, Miserez M. Laparoscopic versus open surgical techniques for ventral or incisional hernia repair. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011;3:CD007781.
4. Schroeder AD, Debus ES, Schroeder M, Reinpold WM. Laparoscopic transperitoneal sublay mesh repair: a new technique for the cure of ventral and incisional hernias. Surg Endosc. 2013;27:648-54.
5. Miserez M, Penninckx F. Endoscopic totally preperitoneal ventral hernia repair. Surg Endosc 2002;16:1207-13.
TAPP laparoscopic repair of right inguinal hernia after artificial sphincter placement for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence
Incapacitating post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence may be managed by the placement of an artificial sphincter. This sphincter is composed of an inflatable circular tape (the sphincter itself), a remote control located in the scrotum, and of a reservoir connected to the sphincter by a catheter. This reservoir is positioned within the preperitoneal space using an anterior inguinal approach through a mini-incision in the transversalis fascia which weakens the posterior wall of the inguinal canal, hence increasing the risk of inguinal hernia.
This film demonstrates a typical case management of such hernia. The anterior approach is delicate as repair of the inguinal canal may well induce trauma to the catheter connected to the retromuscular balloon. The posterior approach is therefore valuable as it allows to see the balloon prior to dissecting the preperitoneal space. The film highlights the specific issues to be dealt with as well as the tips and tricks related to this approach.
J Leroy, C Saussine, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
5082 views
108 likes
1 comment
08:18
TAPP laparoscopic repair of right inguinal hernia after artificial sphincter placement for post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence
Incapacitating post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence may be managed by the placement of an artificial sphincter. This sphincter is composed of an inflatable circular tape (the sphincter itself), a remote control located in the scrotum, and of a reservoir connected to the sphincter by a catheter. This reservoir is positioned within the preperitoneal space using an anterior inguinal approach through a mini-incision in the transversalis fascia which weakens the posterior wall of the inguinal canal, hence increasing the risk of inguinal hernia.
This film demonstrates a typical case management of such hernia. The anterior approach is delicate as repair of the inguinal canal may well induce trauma to the catheter connected to the retromuscular balloon. The posterior approach is therefore valuable as it allows to see the balloon prior to dissecting the preperitoneal space. The film highlights the specific issues to be dealt with as well as the tips and tricks related to this approach.
Small bowel volvulus over acute bowel invagination: laparoscopic management
Digestive angiodysplasia is a condition defined by an innate alteration of digestive wall vascular structures, which has been well-described since the development of endoscopy. Its cause is not well known and most occurrences are probably innate. Digestive angiodysplasias can be isolated or multiple. They most frequently affect the right colon, and more rarely the stomach, the duodenum and the small bowel. They are the most frequent cause of occult digestive hemorrhage (30 to 40% of cases) and can more rarely cause occlusive episodes through intestinal invagination, linked to a voluminous angiodysplasia lesion.
Here we describe the case of a girl treated for colonic angiodysplasia lesions. She was admitted to our intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome. CT-scan helped to diagnose a small bowel invagination and decision is made to treat this patient laparoscopically.
More specifically, this 15-year-old girl has a history of strabismus repair in 2011 and right foot surgery for an arteriovenous angiodysplasia lesion. Angiodysplasia was diagnosed after an episode of abdominal pain and a rectorrhagia in 2010. Colonoscopy at this time allowed to find three lesions of 5 to 8mm in diameter. A yearly colonoscopy control is performed. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome with abdominal pain. Abdominal ultrasonography suggested an invagination which was confirmed by injected CT-scan. Decision was made to perform a laparoscopic exploration for a disinvagination or a bowel resection.
J Leroy, L Marx, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1387 views
19 likes
0 comments
07:41
Small bowel volvulus over acute bowel invagination: laparoscopic management
Digestive angiodysplasia is a condition defined by an innate alteration of digestive wall vascular structures, which has been well-described since the development of endoscopy. Its cause is not well known and most occurrences are probably innate. Digestive angiodysplasias can be isolated or multiple. They most frequently affect the right colon, and more rarely the stomach, the duodenum and the small bowel. They are the most frequent cause of occult digestive hemorrhage (30 to 40% of cases) and can more rarely cause occlusive episodes through intestinal invagination, linked to a voluminous angiodysplasia lesion.
Here we describe the case of a girl treated for colonic angiodysplasia lesions. She was admitted to our intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome. CT-scan helped to diagnose a small bowel invagination and decision is made to treat this patient laparoscopically.
More specifically, this 15-year-old girl has a history of strabismus repair in 2011 and right foot surgery for an arteriovenous angiodysplasia lesion. Angiodysplasia was diagnosed after an episode of abdominal pain and a rectorrhagia in 2010. Colonoscopy at this time allowed to find three lesions of 5 to 8mm in diameter. A yearly colonoscopy control is performed. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit for an occlusive syndrome with abdominal pain. Abdominal ultrasonography suggested an invagination which was confirmed by injected CT-scan. Decision was made to perform a laparoscopic exploration for a disinvagination or a bowel resection.
Tips 'n tricks: cholecystectomy: antegrade approach for difficult dissection
Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a routinely performed surgical intervention. In certain cases, the identification of Calot’s triangle may be difficult due to adhesions or inflammatory infiltrations of adjacent structures. Hydrodissection can allow for an atraumatic dissection but in more complex cases, an antegrade freeing of the gallbladder should be envisaged.
Here we present the case of a man benefiting from a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy for a pancreatitis with common bile duct stone migration. The flag technique, with an antegrade freeing, must be applied in order to complete the procedure laparoscopically.
L Marx, C Hild, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
4637 views
75 likes
8 comments
06:50
Tips 'n tricks: cholecystectomy: antegrade approach for difficult dissection
Today, laparoscopic cholecystectomy is a routinely performed surgical intervention. In certain cases, the identification of Calot’s triangle may be difficult due to adhesions or inflammatory infiltrations of adjacent structures. Hydrodissection can allow for an atraumatic dissection but in more complex cases, an antegrade freeing of the gallbladder should be envisaged.
Here we present the case of a man benefiting from a difficult laparoscopic cholecystectomy for a pancreatitis with common bile duct stone migration. The flag technique, with an antegrade freeing, must be applied in order to complete the procedure laparoscopically.
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
L Marx, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2945 views
20 likes
0 comments
04:19
Acute small bowel obstruction two months after laparoscopic rectal prolapse surgery: laparoscopic management
Acute small bowel obstruction (SBO) is an ever-increasing clinical problem. In this video, the authors demonstrate the laparoscopic management of acute small bowel obstruction. Its successful management depends on a comprehensive knowledge of the etiology and pathophysiology of obstruction, familiarity with imaging methods, good clinical judgment, and sound technical skills. The adoption of laparoscopy in the treatment of SBO has been slow because of concerns for iatrogenic bowel injury and working space issues related to bowel distension.
In this film, the authors demonstrate that it is essential to rapidly manage the patient after the first acute attack.
Although there is an inherent appeal for laparoscopy in its potential to minimize short- and long-term wound complications and perioperative laparotomy-related morbidity and to theoretically induce fewer subsequent adhesions than a traditional laparotomy incision would.

Small bowel obstruction is a pathology commonly found in the current practice of surgical emergencies. The main cause stems from surgical history with a variable onset of symptoms. The introduction of laparoscopic surgery helped to slightly reduce the number of patients presenting with occlusive syndromes. The rapid management of occlusive patients is one of the keys to success. Consequently, once diagnosis has been evoked, imaging studies must be performed, and especially CT-scan, in order to determine the type of obstruction, its mechanism and its severity. After work-up, either a conservative medical treatment or surgery will be decided upon.
PROGRESS - Transanal TME with colo-anal anastomosis without trans-abdominal assistance for rectal cancer in a male patient
The authors put forward an original oncologic Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) technique combined with distal sigmoidectomy followed by a mechanical colo-anal side-to-end anastomosis using a purely transanal route.
The originality of this technique lies in the strictly transanal approach without any laparoscopic assistance as well as in the oncologic dissection of the rectum around its fascia propria. In addition, the technique is outstanding in the mobilization of the sigmoid mesocolon’s root as well as in the retroperitoneal mobilization of the vascular inferior mesenteric axis, hence avoiding contact with intra-abdominal organs.
This technique is called PROGRESS (Peri Rectal Oncologic Gateway for Retroperitoneal EndoScopic Surgery) due to the retroperitoneal endoscopic dissection using a perirectal access.
The video shows images of remarkable quality, especially of anatomical nerve structures, due to the use of a 4mm, 30-degree scope and a Karl Storz High-Definition camera introduced through the TEO™ device.
J Leroy, D Ntourakis, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
5862 views
34 likes
1 comment
18:55
PROGRESS - Transanal TME with colo-anal anastomosis without trans-abdominal assistance for rectal cancer in a male patient
The authors put forward an original oncologic Total Mesorectal Excision (TME) technique combined with distal sigmoidectomy followed by a mechanical colo-anal side-to-end anastomosis using a purely transanal route.
The originality of this technique lies in the strictly transanal approach without any laparoscopic assistance as well as in the oncologic dissection of the rectum around its fascia propria. In addition, the technique is outstanding in the mobilization of the sigmoid mesocolon’s root as well as in the retroperitoneal mobilization of the vascular inferior mesenteric axis, hence avoiding contact with intra-abdominal organs.
This technique is called PROGRESS (Peri Rectal Oncologic Gateway for Retroperitoneal EndoScopic Surgery) due to the retroperitoneal endoscopic dissection using a perirectal access.
The video shows images of remarkable quality, especially of anatomical nerve structures, due to the use of a 4mm, 30-degree scope and a Karl Storz High-Definition camera introduced through the TEO™ device.
Laparoscopic total colectomy for T4N0M0 right colonic cancer and Lynch syndrome
The authors demonstrate their technique of laparoscopic total colectomy indicated for T3 tumors of the right transverse colon in a 40-year-old man with a family history of Lynch syndrome. Colonoscopy performed 3 years earlier ruled out the presence of polyps. Due to the tumor's invasiveness and the necessity to perform repeated endoscopic monitoring, it was decided to perform a total colectomy. The intervention is begun to the right and is completed to the left making sure to avoid any tumor manipulation. The different steps of the procedure are clearly outlined with images of outstanding quality. The vascular approach, especially to the right along the superior mesenteric axis, is beautifully exposed.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
5574 views
112 likes
0 comments
28:29
Laparoscopic total colectomy for T4N0M0 right colonic cancer and Lynch syndrome
The authors demonstrate their technique of laparoscopic total colectomy indicated for T3 tumors of the right transverse colon in a 40-year-old man with a family history of Lynch syndrome. Colonoscopy performed 3 years earlier ruled out the presence of polyps. Due to the tumor's invasiveness and the necessity to perform repeated endoscopic monitoring, it was decided to perform a total colectomy. The intervention is begun to the right and is completed to the left making sure to avoid any tumor manipulation. The different steps of the procedure are clearly outlined with images of outstanding quality. The vascular approach, especially to the right along the superior mesenteric axis, is beautifully exposed.
Laparoscopic rectovaginal resection for endometriosis: transvaginal specimen extraction and anastomosis
The authors demonstrate a rectovaginal resection technique for invasive endometriosis. The original nature of this approach hinges on the mesorectum dissection technique in contact with the rectal wall in order to preserve rectal vascularization and innervation. Additionally, rectal exteriorization through the vagina to prepare for the colorectal anastomosis using a mechanical circular stapling without any abdominal incision is truly original as it contributes to limiting parietal trauma and improving cosmesis. The film truly focuses on the digestive approach just after anterior pelvic dissection has been completed by the team of gynecologic surgeons.
J Leroy, CY Akladios, V Thoma, A Wattiez, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1305 views
23 likes
0 comments
21:33
Laparoscopic rectovaginal resection for endometriosis: transvaginal specimen extraction and anastomosis
The authors demonstrate a rectovaginal resection technique for invasive endometriosis. The original nature of this approach hinges on the mesorectum dissection technique in contact with the rectal wall in order to preserve rectal vascularization and innervation. Additionally, rectal exteriorization through the vagina to prepare for the colorectal anastomosis using a mechanical circular stapling without any abdominal incision is truly original as it contributes to limiting parietal trauma and improving cosmesis. The film truly focuses on the digestive approach just after anterior pelvic dissection has been completed by the team of gynecologic surgeons.
Laparoscopic coloproctectomy with ileoanal pouch anastomosis for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)
Coloproctectomy is a challenging surgical procedure, whether open or laparoscopic, particularly when an ileoanal anastomosis with pouch is performed. The objective of this film is to provide some tricks to perform this surgical procedure laparoscopically.
The main trick is probably the preservation of the right and ileocolic vessels and of the right Drummond marginal vascular arcade that later allows for a division of the superior mesenteric vessels, if necessary to gain a length of 2 to 3cm in the pelvis.
The use of new sealing devices such as the Ligasure™ blunt tip facilitated the standardization of the procedure.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2690 views
74 likes
0 comments
14:18
Laparoscopic coloproctectomy with ileoanal pouch anastomosis for familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)
Coloproctectomy is a challenging surgical procedure, whether open or laparoscopic, particularly when an ileoanal anastomosis with pouch is performed. The objective of this film is to provide some tricks to perform this surgical procedure laparoscopically.
The main trick is probably the preservation of the right and ileocolic vessels and of the right Drummond marginal vascular arcade that later allows for a division of the superior mesenteric vessels, if necessary to gain a length of 2 to 3cm in the pelvis.
The use of new sealing devices such as the Ligasure™ blunt tip facilitated the standardization of the procedure.
Redo management of Crohn's disease after ileocaecal resection 20 years ago: new ileocolic laparoscopic resection
Crohn’s disease is an evolutive inflammatory bowel disease. Surgery may be performed several times during the patient’s life. Using a laparoscopic approach limits the risk of adhesions and the possibilities of re-operations in those patients.
In this film, the surgeon comes across difficulties due to postoperative adhesions and the interest of using new energy devices such as the LigaSure™ blunt tip device and the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device to free the small bowel and divide the mesos with an easy and secure hemostasis.
Concerning the anastomosis between the small bowel and the colon, the use of the new generation of staples manufactured by Covidien is extremely worthy of interest because of the ergonomics of the new handle and the perfect closure and hemostasis of the stapling line of the Tri-staple™ cartridge technology.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1320 views
9 likes
0 comments
16:40
Redo management of Crohn's disease after ileocaecal resection 20 years ago: new ileocolic laparoscopic resection
Crohn’s disease is an evolutive inflammatory bowel disease. Surgery may be performed several times during the patient’s life. Using a laparoscopic approach limits the risk of adhesions and the possibilities of re-operations in those patients.
In this film, the surgeon comes across difficulties due to postoperative adhesions and the interest of using new energy devices such as the LigaSure™ blunt tip device and the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device to free the small bowel and divide the mesos with an easy and secure hemostasis.
Concerning the anastomosis between the small bowel and the colon, the use of the new generation of staples manufactured by Covidien is extremely worthy of interest because of the ergonomics of the new handle and the perfect closure and hemostasis of the stapling line of the Tri-staple™ cartridge technology.
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer using Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device
The interest of this video is to demonstrate a fully laparoscopic oncologic right colectomy technique performed by means of novel dissection instruments such as the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device (Valleylab, Covidien) as well as stapling devices designed for anastomosis (Endo-GIA™ Tri-staple™ technology, Covidien). Regarding the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device, one may appreciate its efficacy, notably to achieve hemostasis of ileocolic and right colic vessels.
Its simplicity of use and safety in controlling the action to coagulate and divide tissues have been strongly appreciated from the operator’s side who is a regular user of the Ligasure™ technology. The great freedom of movement related to the absence of cable and to the lightness of the instrument accounts mostly for the almost immediate adoption of this novel laparoscopic instrument.
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
5617 views
133 likes
0 comments
12:28
Laparoscopic right colectomy for caecal cancer using Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device
The interest of this video is to demonstrate a fully laparoscopic oncologic right colectomy technique performed by means of novel dissection instruments such as the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device (Valleylab, Covidien) as well as stapling devices designed for anastomosis (Endo-GIA™ Tri-staple™ technology, Covidien). Regarding the Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device, one may appreciate its efficacy, notably to achieve hemostasis of ileocolic and right colic vessels.
Its simplicity of use and safety in controlling the action to coagulate and divide tissues have been strongly appreciated from the operator’s side who is a regular user of the Ligasure™ technology. The great freedom of movement related to the absence of cable and to the lightness of the instrument accounts mostly for the almost immediate adoption of this novel laparoscopic instrument.
Segmental bowel resection and transanal specimen extraction for Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis (DIE)
Endometriosis can affect the bowel in 5-15% of cases and the most common sites are the rectum, the sigmoid colon, the appendix, and the small bowel. Patients may present dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and chronic pelvic pain, as well as digestive symptoms such as dyschezia, constipation and diarrhea during menstruation. Preoperative work-up includes transanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, which according to the nodule’s location, can accurately describe the lesions. The laparoscopic approach includes adhesiolysis (shaving), partial thickness wall excision (mucosal skinning), discoid resection, and segmental bowel resection. In this video, we present the case of a 30-year-old patient complaining from severe dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia associated with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) of the sigmoid colon that was treated by means of nodule excision, segmental bowel resection, and transanal specimen extraction.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, J Albornoz, E Faller, M Puga
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2400 views
15 likes
0 comments
10:12
Segmental bowel resection and transanal specimen extraction for Deep Infiltrating Endometriosis (DIE)
Endometriosis can affect the bowel in 5-15% of cases and the most common sites are the rectum, the sigmoid colon, the appendix, and the small bowel. Patients may present dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and chronic pelvic pain, as well as digestive symptoms such as dyschezia, constipation and diarrhea during menstruation. Preoperative work-up includes transanal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, which according to the nodule’s location, can accurately describe the lesions. The laparoscopic approach includes adhesiolysis (shaving), partial thickness wall excision (mucosal skinning), discoid resection, and segmental bowel resection. In this video, we present the case of a 30-year-old patient complaining from severe dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and dyschezia associated with deep infiltrating endometriosis (DIE) of the sigmoid colon that was treated by means of nodule excision, segmental bowel resection, and transanal specimen extraction.
Laparoscopic three-trocar sigmoidectomy with transanal extraction and new Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device
Introduction
We present the case of a 32-year-old female patient with recurrent episodes of diverticulitis. She underwent an elective sigmoidectomy using the new Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device.

Methods
Our set-up consisted of a standard three-port technique with one umbilical optical 10mm port with 1x5mm and 1x12mm right iliac fossa (RIF) ports. After initial peritoneoscopy, the sigmoid mesocolon was divided close to the bowel using the new Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The mesocolic window was continued distally to the rectosigmoid junction and proximally to the descending colon. The lateral attachments were then mobilized. After rectal washout, the rectum was divided and the sigmoid colon extracted transanally. A colotomy was then made above the inflamed area, the anvil of a circular stapler introduced into the colonic lumen and then advanced up to the proximal bowel (with the aid of a bowel grasper sheathed in a flexible plastic tubing). The proximal sigmoid colon was then divided with a linear stapling device, the specimen removed transanally and the rectum closed. The spike of the anvil was then delivered through the proximal colon using the fishing technique. The colorectal anastomosis was then fashioned in the usual technique with a circular stapler. A leak test was performed thereafter.

Results
The procedure was successfully completed. The Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device performed similarly to other power sources but without the impedance of additional wires. It allows for ease of use and quick changing of instruments and ports without the potential of snagging the wire.

Conclusion
The Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device performed excellently for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Cordless dissectors and vessel-sealing devices will be an excellent adjunct to minimally invasive surgery of the future.
J Leroy, B Barry, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1678 views
5 likes
2 comments
21:52
Laparoscopic three-trocar sigmoidectomy with transanal extraction and new Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device
Introduction
We present the case of a 32-year-old female patient with recurrent episodes of diverticulitis. She underwent an elective sigmoidectomy using the new Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device.

Methods
Our set-up consisted of a standard three-port technique with one umbilical optical 10mm port with 1x5mm and 1x12mm right iliac fossa (RIF) ports. After initial peritoneoscopy, the sigmoid mesocolon was divided close to the bowel using the new Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device. The mesocolic window was continued distally to the rectosigmoid junction and proximally to the descending colon. The lateral attachments were then mobilized. After rectal washout, the rectum was divided and the sigmoid colon extracted transanally. A colotomy was then made above the inflamed area, the anvil of a circular stapler introduced into the colonic lumen and then advanced up to the proximal bowel (with the aid of a bowel grasper sheathed in a flexible plastic tubing). The proximal sigmoid colon was then divided with a linear stapling device, the specimen removed transanally and the rectum closed. The spike of the anvil was then delivered through the proximal colon using the fishing technique. The colorectal anastomosis was then fashioned in the usual technique with a circular stapler. A leak test was performed thereafter.

Results
The procedure was successfully completed. The Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device performed similarly to other power sources but without the impedance of additional wires. It allows for ease of use and quick changing of instruments and ports without the potential of snagging the wire.

Conclusion
The Sonicision™ cordless ultrasonic dissection device performed excellently for laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Cordless dissectors and vessel-sealing devices will be an excellent adjunct to minimally invasive surgery of the future.
Laparoscopic treatment of biliary peritonitis following complete division of posterior right lateral duct
Bile duct injury is a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early recognition and an adequate multidisciplinary approach are the cornerstones for the optimal final outcome. This video shows the laparoscopic management of biliary peritonitis after complete division of a posterior right lateral branch.

Discussion:
The incidence of accessory hepatic ducts is reported to range from 1.4% to 27% and has been found to range from 15% to 28% in autopsy series (1,2,3).
Injury of the extra-hepatic bile ducts (BDI) is the most serious complication when performing cholecystectomy, leading to biliary leakage and peritonitis. Treatment and prevention of this complication are essential in the management of gallstone diseases. The incidence of this complication depends on local inflammation at the hepatoduodenal ligament, on the type of approach used, and on the experience of the surgeon (4,5).
Injuries of tiny posterior aberrant ducts, which enter the main duct proximal to or within the cystic duct, may accidentally occur during surgery, causing partial or total segmental duct obstruction or bile leakage. Bile duct injuries can be split into five groups according to the mechanism of etiology or to the severity of the lesion.
The most commonly used classification of acute bile duct injuries (BDI) is the one proposed by Strasberg et al. (6):
Type A: bile leak from a minor duct still in contact with the common bile duct;
Type B: occlusion of part of the biliary tree;
Type C: bile leak from the duct not in contact with the common bile duct;
Type D: lateral injury to extra-hepatic bile duct;
Type E: circumferential injury of major bile ducts.
Here, the clinical case presents a type C lesion successfully managed through a conservative surgical approach.
References:
1. Seibert D, Matulis SR, Griswold F. A rare right hepatic duct anatomical variant discovered after laparoscopic bile duct transection. Surg Laparosc Endosc 1996;6:61-4.
2. Suhocki PV, Meyers WC. Injury to aberrant bile ducts during cholecystectomy: a common cause of diagnostic error and treatment delay. AJR Am J Roentgenol 1999;172:955-9.
3. Hirao K, Miyazaki A, Fujimoto T, Isomoto I, Hayashi K. Evaluation of aberrant bile ducts before laparoscopic cholecystectomy: helical CT cholangiography versus MR cholangiography. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2000;175:713-20.
4. Hugh TB. New strategies to prevent laparoscopic bile duct injury--surgeons can learn from pilots. Surgery 2002;132:826-35.
5. MacFadyen BV Jr, Vecchio R, Ricardo AE, Mathis CR. Bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: the United States experience. Surg Endosc 1998;12:315-21.
6. Strasberg SM, Hertl M, Soper NJ. An analysis of the problem of biliary injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. J Am Coll Surg 1995;180:101-25.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
5181 views
40 likes
2 comments
07:42
Laparoscopic treatment of biliary peritonitis following complete division of posterior right lateral duct
Bile duct injury is a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early recognition and an adequate multidisciplinary approach are the cornerstones for the optimal final outcome. This video shows the laparoscopic management of biliary peritonitis after complete division of a posterior right lateral branch.

Discussion:
The incidence of accessory hepatic ducts is reported to range from 1.4% to 27% and has been found to range from 15% to 28% in autopsy series (1,2,3).
Injury of the extra-hepatic bile ducts (BDI) is the most serious complication when performing cholecystectomy, leading to biliary leakage and peritonitis. Treatment and prevention of this complication are essential in the management of gallstone diseases. The incidence of this complication depends on local inflammation at the hepatoduodenal ligament, on the type of approach used, and on the experience of the surgeon (4,5).
Injuries of tiny posterior aberrant ducts, which enter the main duct proximal to or within the cystic duct, may accidentally occur during surgery, causing partial or total segmental duct obstruction or bile leakage. Bile duct injuries can be split into five groups according to the mechanism of etiology or to the severity of the lesion.
The most commonly used classification of acute bile duct injuries (BDI) is the one proposed by Strasberg et al. (6):
Type A: bile leak from a minor duct still in contact with the common bile duct;
Type B: occlusion of part of the biliary tree;
Type C: bile leak from the duct not in contact with the common bile duct;
Type D: lateral injury to extra-hepatic bile duct;
Type E: circumferential injury of major bile ducts.
Here, the clinical case presents a type C lesion successfully managed through a conservative surgical approach.
References:
1. Seibert D, Matulis SR, Griswold F. A rare right hepatic duct anatomical variant discovered after laparoscopic bile duct transection. Surg Laparosc Endosc 1996;6:61-4.
2. Suhocki PV, Meyers WC. Injury to aberrant bile ducts during cholecystectomy: a common cause of diagnostic error and treatment delay. AJR Am J Roentgenol 1999;172:955-9.
3. Hirao K, Miyazaki A, Fujimoto T, Isomoto I, Hayashi K. Evaluation of aberrant bile ducts before laparoscopic cholecystectomy: helical CT cholangiography versus MR cholangiography. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2000;175:713-20.
4. Hugh TB. New strategies to prevent laparoscopic bile duct injury--surgeons can learn from pilots. Surgery 2002;132:826-35.
5. MacFadyen BV Jr, Vecchio R, Ricardo AE, Mathis CR. Bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: the United States experience. Surg Endosc 1998;12:315-21.
6. Strasberg SM, Hertl M, Soper NJ. An analysis of the problem of biliary injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. J Am Coll Surg 1995;180:101-25.
Appendicular mucocele: laparoscopic management
Appendicular mucocele is a rare, yet typical tumor of the appendix. Its potentially malignant nature, the risk of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) in case of rupture mandates a surgical resection without damage. In this case, diagnosis was suspected during colonoscopy performed because of right iliac fossa pain. The exam revealed an appendicular protrusion. CT-scan demonstrated the presence of an appendicular mucocele. A laparoscopic approach was decided upon. Parietal adhesions were identified. A primary vascular approach is then carried out. Once the ileocolic division has been achieved, a medial approach allows to complete the dissection within the wall keeping away from the lesion. Following the complete specimen resection, an ileocolic anastomosis is performed laparoscopically. At the end of the intervention, a small bowel exploration helps to identify a Meckel’s diverticulum that will be resected.
M Vix, D Mutter, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
6743 views
91 likes
0 comments
15:47
Appendicular mucocele: laparoscopic management
Appendicular mucocele is a rare, yet typical tumor of the appendix. Its potentially malignant nature, the risk of pseudomyxoma peritonei (PMP) in case of rupture mandates a surgical resection without damage. In this case, diagnosis was suspected during colonoscopy performed because of right iliac fossa pain. The exam revealed an appendicular protrusion. CT-scan demonstrated the presence of an appendicular mucocele. A laparoscopic approach was decided upon. Parietal adhesions were identified. A primary vascular approach is then carried out. Once the ileocolic division has been achieved, a medial approach allows to complete the dissection within the wall keeping away from the lesion. Following the complete specimen resection, an ileocolic anastomosis is performed laparoscopically. At the end of the intervention, a small bowel exploration helps to identify a Meckel’s diverticulum that will be resected.
Three trocar laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for diffuse diverticulosis with transanal specimen extraction: tips and tricks
The video demonstrates the case of a woman with recurrent diverticulitis, BMI 30. She has a background of a previous hysterectomy via a Pfannenstiel incision. A three-port sigmoidectomy with transanal excision was carried out.
Methods
The set up consisted of a 12mm umbilical optical port, a 12mm port in the right iliac fossa, and a 5mm operating port in the right flank. After initial peritoneoscopy, any abnormal adhesions were divided. The sigmoid colon mesentery was divided high, near the sigmoid colon in order to preserve the mesenteric vasculature. The mesentery was divided to the level of the rectum, which was then skeletonized. The proximal colon was mobilized free up to the level of the splenic flexure. The rectum was then ligated, washed out with betadine and transected. A Vicryl Loop was attached to the proximal stump which was then removed transanally. A colotomy was created above the level of the diverticula and the anvil of a circular stapler introduced into the proximal colon. The proximal sigmoid colon mesentery was divided and the sigmoid transected with a linear stapler. The specimen was then fully removed transanally. The anvil was then delivered through the colon via the fishing technique. The rectal stump was closed with a linear stapler. A colorectal anastomosis was fashioned with a circular stapler. After verifying that the colon was not twisted, an air test was performed.
Conclusion
The video demonstrates a three-port technique for laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE).
J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2624 views
13 likes
0 comments
16:52
Three trocar laparoscopic sigmoidectomy for diffuse diverticulosis with transanal specimen extraction: tips and tricks
The video demonstrates the case of a woman with recurrent diverticulitis, BMI 30. She has a background of a previous hysterectomy via a Pfannenstiel incision. A three-port sigmoidectomy with transanal excision was carried out.
Methods
The set up consisted of a 12mm umbilical optical port, a 12mm port in the right iliac fossa, and a 5mm operating port in the right flank. After initial peritoneoscopy, any abnormal adhesions were divided. The sigmoid colon mesentery was divided high, near the sigmoid colon in order to preserve the mesenteric vasculature. The mesentery was divided to the level of the rectum, which was then skeletonized. The proximal colon was mobilized free up to the level of the splenic flexure. The rectum was then ligated, washed out with betadine and transected. A Vicryl Loop was attached to the proximal stump which was then removed transanally. A colotomy was created above the level of the diverticula and the anvil of a circular stapler introduced into the proximal colon. The proximal sigmoid colon mesentery was divided and the sigmoid transected with a linear stapler. The specimen was then fully removed transanally. The anvil was then delivered through the colon via the fishing technique. The rectal stump was closed with a linear stapler. A colorectal anastomosis was fashioned with a circular stapler. After verifying that the colon was not twisted, an air test was performed.
Conclusion
The video demonstrates a three-port technique for laparoscopic sigmoidectomy with natural orifice specimen extraction (NOSE).
Deep endometriosis excision with ureteral anastomosis followed by segmental rectosigmoid resection, transvaginal specimen extraction, and a transanal colorectal anastomosis
We present the case of a 29-year-old nulligest woman. Four years ago, she had a previous surgery with a rectovaginal nodule removed both by laparoscopy and vaginal approach. She has complained of dyspareunia (8/10), dysmenorrhea (8/10), dyschezia (8/10) and infertility over the last 2 years, but she also suffers from bladder dysfunction requiring urinary self-catheterization during her menstrual periods. The laparoscopic exploration revealed a big fibrotic nodule located in the right pelvic sidewall involving the right ureter and the rectum. Right ureter resection and anastomosis were performed. Segmental rectosigmoid resection was followed by transvaginal specimen extraction and a transanal colorectal anastomosis. The intracorporeal laparoscopic technique allows for a limited bowel devascularization and for an appropriate anastomosis with no need for extra abdominal incisions. No complications were noted and the patient had a good clinical evolution.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, E Faller, J Albornoz, P Messori
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
2495 views
20 likes
0 comments
30:14
Deep endometriosis excision with ureteral anastomosis followed by segmental rectosigmoid resection, transvaginal specimen extraction, and a transanal colorectal anastomosis
We present the case of a 29-year-old nulligest woman. Four years ago, she had a previous surgery with a rectovaginal nodule removed both by laparoscopy and vaginal approach. She has complained of dyspareunia (8/10), dysmenorrhea (8/10), dyschezia (8/10) and infertility over the last 2 years, but she also suffers from bladder dysfunction requiring urinary self-catheterization during her menstrual periods. The laparoscopic exploration revealed a big fibrotic nodule located in the right pelvic sidewall involving the right ureter and the rectum. Right ureter resection and anastomosis were performed. Segmental rectosigmoid resection was followed by transvaginal specimen extraction and a transanal colorectal anastomosis. The intracorporeal laparoscopic technique allows for a limited bowel devascularization and for an appropriate anastomosis with no need for extra abdominal incisions. No complications were noted and the patient had a good clinical evolution.
Fully laparoscopic segmental rectosigmoid resection with Natural Orifice Specimen Extraction (NOSE) for bowel endometriosis
We report the case of a 45-year-old woman, G2P2, who presents with rectal bleeding, constipation and subocclusive syndrome caused by rectosigmoid endometriosis. The laparoscopic exploration revealed a sigmoid stuck by a few adhesions to the lateral abdominal wall underneath the left ovary and obliteration of the left uterosacral ligament and rectovaginal septum. A segmental bowel resection was performed with all necessary steps for mechanical bowel anastomosis carried out laparoscopically. The transvaginal specimen extraction obviated the need to create an abdominal incision. There were no complications and the patient presented a clinical remission following surgery. This surgical technique has the advantage of a shorter division of the mesentery, which enables a better vascularization of the bowel.
A Wattiez, J Leroy, S Maia, A Vázquez Rodriguez, P Trompoukis, J Alcocer
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2350 views
10 likes
1 comment
08:03
Fully laparoscopic segmental rectosigmoid resection with Natural Orifice Specimen Extraction (NOSE) for bowel endometriosis
We report the case of a 45-year-old woman, G2P2, who presents with rectal bleeding, constipation and subocclusive syndrome caused by rectosigmoid endometriosis. The laparoscopic exploration revealed a sigmoid stuck by a few adhesions to the lateral abdominal wall underneath the left ovary and obliteration of the left uterosacral ligament and rectovaginal septum. A segmental bowel resection was performed with all necessary steps for mechanical bowel anastomosis carried out laparoscopically. The transvaginal specimen extraction obviated the need to create an abdominal incision. There were no complications and the patient presented a clinical remission following surgery. This surgical technique has the advantage of a shorter division of the mesentery, which enables a better vascularization of the bowel.