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Artur TROVÃO

Centro Hospitalar Entre o Douro e Vouga
Santa Maria da Feira, Portugal
MD
115 likes
2.3K views
3 comments
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Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
J Magalhães, C Osorio, L Frutuoso, AM Pereira, A Trovão, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
2 months ago
1705 views
9 likes
3 comments
09:44
Laparoscopic total gastrectomy
A multimodality approach remains the only potential treatment for advanced gastric cancer. Oncological outcomes seem to be equivalent either in open surgery or in minimally invasive surgery. Therefore, laparoscopic gastric resection is expanding in expert centers.
The authors present a clinical case of a 70-year-old woman with no relevant clinical past. She presented with a 1-month complaint of epigastric pain and melena. She underwent an upper endoscopy, which showed an ulcerated gastric lesion at the lesser curvature. Biopsy revealed a poorly cohesive gastric carcinoma with signet ring cells. Thoraco-abdominal-pelvic CT-scan revealed a thickening of the gastric wall associated with multiple perigastric and celiac trunk lymph nodes. She was proposed for perioperative chemotherapy. On the restaging CT-scan, there was no evidence of disease progression and therefore she underwent a laparoscopic radical total gastrectomy.
The benefits of minimally invasive surgery, combined with the increasing evidence of oncological results overlapping with open surgery, have contributed to the progressive implementation of laparoscopic surgery in the treatment of malignant gastric pathology.
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.
A Trovão, L Costa, M Costa, R Ferreira de Almeida, M Nora
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
596 views
106 likes
0 comments
09:55
Surgical approach to intragastric migrated hiatal mesh
Mesh use in the laparoscopic repair of hiatal hernia is associated with fewer recurrences. However, it may cause some complications such as dysphagia, stenosis or even erosion with esophageal or gastric migration.
A 61-year-old woman with a large type III hiatal hernia underwent a laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication with closure of the hiatal crura with a dual U-shaped mesh.
She was symptom-free for 1 year, subsequently developing dysphagia and weight loss. An esophagogastric barium test revealed minimal contrast passage and endoscopy showed partial intragastric mesh migration.
The patient was submitted to a laparoscopic removal of migrated mesh with a transgastric approach. Hiatus inspection demonstrated significant fibrosis, with plication integrity and no evidence of recurrent hernia. A gastrotomy was performed allowing to identify and remove a migrated intra-gastric mesh. Careful evaluation did not show any gastric fistula and pressure test with methylene blue showed no evidence of leak.
This unusual approach avoided hiatus dissection, decreasing the risks of local complications such as perforation and bleeding. The patient had no postoperative complications, recovered well, and remained asymptomatic.