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Antonio D'URSO

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Strasbourg, France
MD, PhD
4207 likes
94662 views
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Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 months ago
2033 views
335 likes
0 comments
05:00
Laparoscopic appendectomy for recurrent appendicitis after medical treatment
Appendectomy is the only curative treatment of appendicitis. However, the management of patients with an appendiceal mass or abscess can be temporarily managed medically with intravenous antibiotic therapy and/or percutaneous drainage. And yet, there are many controversies over the non-operative management of acute appendicitis. In 2015, Fair et al. used data from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Project to evaluate 30-day morbidity and mortality of intervention (laparoscopic and open appendectomy) at different time periods. A delay of operative intervention longer than 48 hours was associated with a doubling of complication rates. Elective appendectomy can be performed after 6 to 8 weeks later, which proves successful in the vast majority of patients.
This is the case of an 83-year-old man who presented with an acute appendicitis treated medically in another hospital. The patient had a past medical history of arterial hypertension, cardiomyopathy, previous cerebral ischemia, and rectal polyp. A delayed appendectomy was planned. However, before the procedure, a total colonoscopy was performed because of the history of polyps. This elderly patient was hospitalized for colonoscopy. At admission, he presented with fever, right iliac fossa tenderness, and a biological inflammatory syndrome. A CT-scan was performed. It showed a recurrent acute appendicitis without mass, with a 2cm abscess on the tip of the appendix. An appendectomy was performed in this case.
Laparoscopic postpartum right diaphragmatic hernia reduction
A 35-year-old patient was referred to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and respiratory distress. The patient gave natural childbirth three days before the episode, a childbirth without immediate complications.
Clinically, the patient presented with tachypnea, tachycardia, and desaturation, nauseas and constipation, depressible abdomen with generalized pain on palpation. The absence of vesicular murmur and right lung dullness were noted.
Blood lab findings showed increased inflammatory parameters.
An abdominothoracic CT-scan with contrast was performed. It showed a voluminous right diaphragmatic hernia containing the omentum, a distended colon and liver segment VIII with signs of hypoperfusion.
A surgical procedure was performed. A laparoscopic approach was performed and the patient’s hiatal hernia was reduced by closing the defect with a non-absorbable suture and by placing a Vicryl mesh.
The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 3.
A D'Urso, P Saleg, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1468 views
112 likes
0 comments
09:10
Laparoscopic postpartum right diaphragmatic hernia reduction
A 35-year-old patient was referred to our emergency department for acute abdominal pain and respiratory distress. The patient gave natural childbirth three days before the episode, a childbirth without immediate complications.
Clinically, the patient presented with tachypnea, tachycardia, and desaturation, nauseas and constipation, depressible abdomen with generalized pain on palpation. The absence of vesicular murmur and right lung dullness were noted.
Blood lab findings showed increased inflammatory parameters.
An abdominothoracic CT-scan with contrast was performed. It showed a voluminous right diaphragmatic hernia containing the omentum, a distended colon and liver segment VIII with signs of hypoperfusion.
A surgical procedure was performed. A laparoscopic approach was performed and the patient’s hiatal hernia was reduced by closing the defect with a non-absorbable suture and by placing a Vicryl mesh.
The patient recovered with no complications and was discharged on postoperative day 3.
Live interactive transanal TME (TaTME) with the TEO™ platform
Randomized clinical trials such as COLOR II, COREAN and CLASICC, have shown better results for laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME), in terms of short-term and long-term outcomes, when compared with open TME.
Laparoscopic TME presents some limitations such as low rectal cancer which has a high risk of leaving a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and a narrow pelvis. Conversion to open procedures remains unsatisfactory.
Transanal TME (taTME) has been proposed to give a new option in cases where laparoscopic TME is difficult.
In this video, we present the case of a transanal approach with the TEO™ platform for low rectal cancer.
A Melani, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
2985 views
324 likes
0 comments
45:51
Live interactive transanal TME (TaTME) with the TEO™ platform
Randomized clinical trials such as COLOR II, COREAN and CLASICC, have shown better results for laparoscopic total mesorectal excision (TME), in terms of short-term and long-term outcomes, when compared with open TME.
Laparoscopic TME presents some limitations such as low rectal cancer which has a high risk of leaving a positive circumferential resection margin (CRM) and a narrow pelvis. Conversion to open procedures remains unsatisfactory.
Transanal TME (taTME) has been proposed to give a new option in cases where laparoscopic TME is difficult.
In this video, we present the case of a transanal approach with the TEO™ platform for low rectal cancer.
Laparoscopic appendectomy after appendicular phlegmon
Appendicitis is one of the main reasons for consultation and surgical interventions in the emergency departments around the world. If it is not diagnosed and treated timely, it can evolve towards an appendicular perforation, and as a result, it can become a peritonitis or an appendicular phlegmon. This latter case may occur in approximately 10% of cases.
Currently, the management of the appendicular phlegmon is controversial. Some authors prefer to perform an appendectomy immediately, and others are in favor of medical treatment using antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainage if possible and delay appendectomy.
In this case, we present a patient presenting with an appendicular phlegmon in which a conservative management with percutaneous drainage and delayed surgery were decided upon.
P Saleg, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
7340 views
513 likes
0 comments
04:17
Laparoscopic appendectomy after appendicular phlegmon
Appendicitis is one of the main reasons for consultation and surgical interventions in the emergency departments around the world. If it is not diagnosed and treated timely, it can evolve towards an appendicular perforation, and as a result, it can become a peritonitis or an appendicular phlegmon. This latter case may occur in approximately 10% of cases.
Currently, the management of the appendicular phlegmon is controversial. Some authors prefer to perform an appendectomy immediately, and others are in favor of medical treatment using antibiotic therapy and percutaneous drainage if possible and delay appendectomy.
In this case, we present a patient presenting with an appendicular phlegmon in which a conservative management with percutaneous drainage and delayed surgery were decided upon.
The VERSA LIFTER BAND™: a new option for liver retraction in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity
During laparoscopic bariatric procedures in morbidly obese patients, the surgeon's operative view is often obscured by the hypertrophic adipose left lobe of the liver.
To provide adequate operative views and working space, an appropriate retraction of the left liver lobe is required.
The use of a conventional liver retractor mandates an additional subxiphoid wound, resulting in patient discomfort for pain and scar formation, with the additional risk of iatrogenic liver injury during retraction maneuvers.
To overcome these limitations, we present the use of a simple, rapid, and safe technique for liver retraction using the VERSA LIFTER™ Band disposable liver suspension system or retractor.
A D'Urso, M Vix, B Dallemagne, HA Mercoli, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
2 years ago
1628 views
37 likes
0 comments
03:48
The VERSA LIFTER BAND™: a new option for liver retraction in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity
During laparoscopic bariatric procedures in morbidly obese patients, the surgeon's operative view is often obscured by the hypertrophic adipose left lobe of the liver.
To provide adequate operative views and working space, an appropriate retraction of the left liver lobe is required.
The use of a conventional liver retractor mandates an additional subxiphoid wound, resulting in patient discomfort for pain and scar formation, with the additional risk of iatrogenic liver injury during retraction maneuvers.
To overcome these limitations, we present the use of a simple, rapid, and safe technique for liver retraction using the VERSA LIFTER™ Band disposable liver suspension system or retractor.
Robot-assisted gastric band removal
Adjustable gastric banding (AGB) is one of the surgical treatment modalities for morbid obesity. Over the years, popularity for this treatment increased. It has been by far the most performed bariatric procedure for years in Europe and in the United States. Many gastric band removals are linked to complications and weight loss failure, indicating a new bariatric procedure for some of the patients. Complications after AGB are not uncommon and consist mainly of gastroesophageal reflux disease, pouch dilatation, slippage of the band, and intragastric migration. The failure of the gastric band is multifactorial. Gastric band removal does not preclude a new bariatric procedure (the most common procedure performed in our department is Roux en-Y gastric bypass), which is feasible in the same operative time but the 2-step approach is suitable. The new bariatric procedure offers adequate surgical outcomes and satisfactory results in terms of weight loss.
M Nedelcu, A D'Urso, HA Mercoli, M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1013 views
36 likes
0 comments
08:14
Robot-assisted gastric band removal
Adjustable gastric banding (AGB) is one of the surgical treatment modalities for morbid obesity. Over the years, popularity for this treatment increased. It has been by far the most performed bariatric procedure for years in Europe and in the United States. Many gastric band removals are linked to complications and weight loss failure, indicating a new bariatric procedure for some of the patients. Complications after AGB are not uncommon and consist mainly of gastroesophageal reflux disease, pouch dilatation, slippage of the band, and intragastric migration. The failure of the gastric band is multifactorial. Gastric band removal does not preclude a new bariatric procedure (the most common procedure performed in our department is Roux en-Y gastric bypass), which is feasible in the same operative time but the 2-step approach is suitable. The new bariatric procedure offers adequate surgical outcomes and satisfactory results in terms of weight loss.
Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
J Leroy, HA Mercoli, S Tzedakis, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2089 views
98 likes
0 comments
10:54
Stomal prolapse and parastomal incisional hernia treatment using laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh repair
Introduction: Prolapse stands for one of the most common complications of colostomy (>10%). Parastomal incisional hernia also represents 10 to 50% of complications. When both are present, the Sugarbaker technique represents a good indication due to mesh repair and pseudo-subperitonization, which can manage both prolapse and hernia. The laparoscopic modified Sugarbaker technique can be performed laparoscopically even in case of multiple previous laparotomies.
Clinical case: We report the case of a 71-year-old male patient presenting with parastomal incisional hernia and stomal prolapse after multiple abdominal procedures for ulcerative colitis, including rectosigmoidectomy, Hartmann procedure for anastomotic leak, left extended colectomy and stomal transposition for ischemic necrosis. An intra-abdominal proctectomy was attempted to manage the recurrence of colitis on the rectal stump. However, this attempt proved unsuccessful, and a local abdominoperineal resection was performed. Due to symptomatic hernia and prolapse, the laparoscopic Sugarbaker modified surgical technique with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair is performed to manage prolapse by pseudo-subperitonization and to manage hernia using an IPOM repair. As shown in this video, this technique is safe, reproducible, and effective.
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
J Leroy, A D'Urso, H Jeddou, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
1923 views
60 likes
1 comment
07:01
Chronic sigmoidovesical fistula: laparoscopic management
The most frequent underlying cause of sigmoidovesical fistula is complicated diverticular disease in 60% of cases followed by colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. It occurs in about 2 to 22% of patients with known diverticular disease. In diverticular sigmoid vesical chronic fistula, the preferred therapeutic management is represented by primary resection with anastomosis performed as a one-stage procedure. It is particularly true when the fistula is located between the vesical dome and the sigmoid colon distally from the trigone vesical. In this video, we demonstrate the laparoscopic management of a chronic sigmoidovesical fistula after acute sigmoid diverticulitis as a one-stage procedure.
Endoscope-guided Nissen fundoplication
Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is a common and almost endemic problem in the Western world. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery is an effective and durable treatment for GERD in patients who are well-selected. Selection depends on a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough physiologic evaluation with endoscopy, pH-monitoring and esophageal manometry. In more advanced and difficult cases, additional tests may be indicated. Cases encountered in practice range from straight forward and "everyday" to extremely complex and difficult; both in the decision-making, the operation, and the patient management. The common thread between all cases of anti-reflux surgery, complex or simple, is a stepwise and organized approach that takes into consideration the individual patient's disease and physiology. We present a case in this video that is not complex but which provides a good illustration of the technical steps required to recreate an effective gastroesophageal valve. We emphasize an atraumatic and efficient approach to the operation that ensures optimal outcomes and will minimize intraoperative complications. We discuss the characteristics of a properly formed fundoplication and debate with other experts some of the minor technical details such as suture patterns and materials. We also show how intraoperative endoscopy can serve as a powerful tool for quality control and postulate that surgeons can improve their results if they adopt routine interoperative control by endoscopy. We hope that you will enjoy and benefit from this case…
LL Swanström, A D'Urso, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
2155 views
117 likes
0 comments
36:15
Endoscope-guided Nissen fundoplication
Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is a common and almost endemic problem in the Western world. Laparoscopic anti-reflux surgery is an effective and durable treatment for GERD in patients who are well-selected. Selection depends on a careful assessment of symptoms and a thorough physiologic evaluation with endoscopy, pH-monitoring and esophageal manometry. In more advanced and difficult cases, additional tests may be indicated. Cases encountered in practice range from straight forward and "everyday" to extremely complex and difficult; both in the decision-making, the operation, and the patient management. The common thread between all cases of anti-reflux surgery, complex or simple, is a stepwise and organized approach that takes into consideration the individual patient's disease and physiology. We present a case in this video that is not complex but which provides a good illustration of the technical steps required to recreate an effective gastroesophageal valve. We emphasize an atraumatic and efficient approach to the operation that ensures optimal outcomes and will minimize intraoperative complications. We discuss the characteristics of a properly formed fundoplication and debate with other experts some of the minor technical details such as suture patterns and materials. We also show how intraoperative endoscopy can serve as a powerful tool for quality control and postulate that surgeons can improve their results if they adopt routine interoperative control by endoscopy. We hope that you will enjoy and benefit from this case…
Onset of internal hernia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: laparoscopic management
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) represents the gold standard of treatment for morbidly obese patients. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, certain complications of this operation present difficult clinical problems. The most challenging complication to determine is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects.

Internal hernias occur more frequently in LRYGB than in the open procedure. This is a significant clinical problem since internal hernia is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO) after LRYGB, which can result in ischemia or infarction and often requires a reoperation.

The incidence of SBO after LGBP is reported to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The most common site of internal hernia after LGBP is at Petersen’s space.
In this video, we present the laparoscopic management of a complete small bowel herniation at Petersen’s space.
A D'Urso, S Perretta, M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1221 views
17 likes
0 comments
11:25
Onset of internal hernia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: laparoscopic management
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) represents the gold standard of treatment for morbidly obese patients. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, certain complications of this operation present difficult clinical problems. The most challenging complication to determine is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects.

Internal hernias occur more frequently in LRYGB than in the open procedure. This is a significant clinical problem since internal hernia is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO) after LRYGB, which can result in ischemia or infarction and often requires a reoperation.

The incidence of SBO after LGBP is reported to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The most common site of internal hernia after LGBP is at Petersen’s space.
In this video, we present the laparoscopic management of a complete small bowel herniation at Petersen’s space.
Laparoscopic management of right hydrothorax following peritoneal dialysis (PD)
Hydrothorax due to migration of dialysis fluid across the diaphragm and into the pleural space creates a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) but generally does not threaten life. The most current surgical option is the thoracoscopic approach. In this video, we propose an alternative treatment through an abdominal laparoscopic approach.
Hydrothorax occurs rarely but represents a well-recognized complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The incidence of this condition ranges between 1.6% and 10% of peritoneal dialysis patients. Patients typically present with respiratory symptoms associated with reduction of dialysis fluid. The presence of pleuroperitoneal communication has been identified as the most common reason explaining hydrothorax in peritoneal dialysis.
Conservative medical treatment is not effective. Surgical approaches range from open repair through a thoracotomy to video-assisted thoracoscopy surgery (VATS) with or without chemical or mechanical pleurodesis.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
659 views
10 likes
0 comments
04:02
Laparoscopic management of right hydrothorax following peritoneal dialysis (PD)
Hydrothorax due to migration of dialysis fluid across the diaphragm and into the pleural space creates a serious complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD) but generally does not threaten life. The most current surgical option is the thoracoscopic approach. In this video, we propose an alternative treatment through an abdominal laparoscopic approach.
Hydrothorax occurs rarely but represents a well-recognized complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The incidence of this condition ranges between 1.6% and 10% of peritoneal dialysis patients. Patients typically present with respiratory symptoms associated with reduction of dialysis fluid. The presence of pleuroperitoneal communication has been identified as the most common reason explaining hydrothorax in peritoneal dialysis.
Conservative medical treatment is not effective. Surgical approaches range from open repair through a thoracotomy to video-assisted thoracoscopy surgery (VATS) with or without chemical or mechanical pleurodesis.
Robot-assisted gastric band removal: any limitations?
Nowadays, indications for gastric band removal are well-standardized. In case of esophageal or gastric dilatation, migration or any injury related to the LAP-BAND® access port or tubing, the band and its access port should be removed. In rare specific cases, part of the LAP-BAND® system (either access port or band) may be preserved.
Before proceeding to the surgical band removal, a complete preoperative radiological and endoscopic work-up should be performed.
Here, we present the case of a 62-year-old woman who benefited from gastric band placement 10 years earlier. The band proved effective. However, for several weeks, she has been suffering from abdominal pain associated with vomiting and hematemesis.
After a work-up which included CT-scanning, water-soluble contrast swallow and gastroscopy, it was decided to remove the band.
L Marx, M Vix, A D'Urso, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
741 views
10 likes
0 comments
08:36
Robot-assisted gastric band removal: any limitations?
Nowadays, indications for gastric band removal are well-standardized. In case of esophageal or gastric dilatation, migration or any injury related to the LAP-BAND® access port or tubing, the band and its access port should be removed. In rare specific cases, part of the LAP-BAND® system (either access port or band) may be preserved.
Before proceeding to the surgical band removal, a complete preoperative radiological and endoscopic work-up should be performed.
Here, we present the case of a 62-year-old woman who benefited from gastric band placement 10 years earlier. The band proved effective. However, for several weeks, she has been suffering from abdominal pain associated with vomiting and hematemesis.
After a work-up which included CT-scanning, water-soluble contrast swallow and gastroscopy, it was decided to remove the band.
Incisional hernia: laparoscopic hybrid repair
About 10% of laparotomies are complicated by the development of incisional hernia (1). The prosthetic repair is the rule in the treatment of incisional hernia and is reported to have a lower recurrence rate than primary suture repair (2). The laparoscopic approach proposed since the early nineties with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair has gained popularity over years. The IPOM technique is easy in case of midline incisional hernia but is more complex in case of lateral suprailiac hernia. The laparoscopic repair is associated with fewer infections as compared to the open technique (3). There are only very few reports on laparoscopic-endoscopic sublay mesh repair of abdominal wall hernias (4, 5).
We present the case of a 66-year-old patient admitted for an incisional hernia subsequent to an open liver resection for gallbladder carcinoma in 2011. The patient developed a symptomatic lateral incisional hernia in the right side of his subcostal incision. The oncologic preoperative work-up was negative. The patient was scheduled for a laparoscopic approach with a hybrid onlay and sublay mesh repair.
Here, authors aim to propose an original technique with a combined onlay and sublay approach to this complicated lateral abdominal incisional hernia.
Bibliographic references:
1. Mudge M, Hughes LE. Incisional hernia: a 10-year prospective study of incidence and attitudes. Br J Surg 1985;72:70-1.
2. Burger JW, Luijendijk RW, Hop WC, Halm JA, Verdaasdonk EG, Jeekel J. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of suture versus mesh repair of incisional hernia. Ann Surg 2004;240:578-83.
3. Sauerland S, Walgenbach M, Habermalz B, Seiler CM, Miserez M. Laparoscopic versus open surgical techniques for ventral or incisional hernia repair. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011;3:CD007781.
4. Schroeder AD, Debus ES, Schroeder M, Reinpold WM. Laparoscopic transperitoneal sublay mesh repair: a new technique for the cure of ventral and incisional hernias. Surg Endosc. 2013;27:648-54.
5. Miserez M, Penninckx F. Endoscopic totally preperitoneal ventral hernia repair. Surg Endosc 2002;16:1207-13.
A D'Urso, J Leroy, T Piardi, P Pessaux, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
3540 views
54 likes
0 comments
07:27
Incisional hernia: laparoscopic hybrid repair
About 10% of laparotomies are complicated by the development of incisional hernia (1). The prosthetic repair is the rule in the treatment of incisional hernia and is reported to have a lower recurrence rate than primary suture repair (2). The laparoscopic approach proposed since the early nineties with intraperitoneal onlay mesh (IPOM) repair has gained popularity over years. The IPOM technique is easy in case of midline incisional hernia but is more complex in case of lateral suprailiac hernia. The laparoscopic repair is associated with fewer infections as compared to the open technique (3). There are only very few reports on laparoscopic-endoscopic sublay mesh repair of abdominal wall hernias (4, 5).
We present the case of a 66-year-old patient admitted for an incisional hernia subsequent to an open liver resection for gallbladder carcinoma in 2011. The patient developed a symptomatic lateral incisional hernia in the right side of his subcostal incision. The oncologic preoperative work-up was negative. The patient was scheduled for a laparoscopic approach with a hybrid onlay and sublay mesh repair.
Here, authors aim to propose an original technique with a combined onlay and sublay approach to this complicated lateral abdominal incisional hernia.
Bibliographic references:
1. Mudge M, Hughes LE. Incisional hernia: a 10-year prospective study of incidence and attitudes. Br J Surg 1985;72:70-1.
2. Burger JW, Luijendijk RW, Hop WC, Halm JA, Verdaasdonk EG, Jeekel J. Long-term follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of suture versus mesh repair of incisional hernia. Ann Surg 2004;240:578-83.
3. Sauerland S, Walgenbach M, Habermalz B, Seiler CM, Miserez M. Laparoscopic versus open surgical techniques for ventral or incisional hernia repair. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 2011;3:CD007781.
4. Schroeder AD, Debus ES, Schroeder M, Reinpold WM. Laparoscopic transperitoneal sublay mesh repair: a new technique for the cure of ventral and incisional hernias. Surg Endosc. 2013;27:648-54.
5. Miserez M, Penninckx F. Endoscopic totally preperitoneal ventral hernia repair. Surg Endosc 2002;16:1207-13.
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy 2 months after acute cholecystitis with intra-abdominal abscess
Cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones is mainly performed as soon as an acute cholecystitis episode settles. The main reason is the fear of higher morbidity and conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open cholecystectomy during acute cholecystitis.
Acute cholecystitis is generally caused by gallstones. Gallstones affect about 10% of the population in the Western world but over 80% of people with gallstones are asymptomatic. Acute cholecystitis develops in 1 to 3% of patients with symptomatic gallstones. Cholecystectomy can be performed by laparotomy or by laparoscopy, either at the time of the initial attack (early treatment) or 2 to 3 months after the initial attack has subsided (delayed treatment). A factor complicating the assessment of outcomes of early treatment is that “early” has been variably defined as anywhere from 24 hours to 5 days after either the onset of symptoms or the time of diagnosis. If a delayed or conservative treatment is selected, patients are treated during the acute phase with antibiotics, very occasionally patients undergo percutaneous cholecystostomy (placement of a tube in the gallbladder). Fifteen to 20% of patients who underwent delayed procedures had persistent or recurrent symptoms requiring intervention before the planned operation. Today early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered to be the treatment of choice for most patients.
L Marx, A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
7964 views
117 likes
1 comment
07:53
Laparoscopic cholecystectomy 2 months after acute cholecystitis with intra-abdominal abscess
Cholecystectomy for symptomatic gallstones is mainly performed as soon as an acute cholecystitis episode settles. The main reason is the fear of higher morbidity and conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open cholecystectomy during acute cholecystitis.
Acute cholecystitis is generally caused by gallstones. Gallstones affect about 10% of the population in the Western world but over 80% of people with gallstones are asymptomatic. Acute cholecystitis develops in 1 to 3% of patients with symptomatic gallstones. Cholecystectomy can be performed by laparotomy or by laparoscopy, either at the time of the initial attack (early treatment) or 2 to 3 months after the initial attack has subsided (delayed treatment). A factor complicating the assessment of outcomes of early treatment is that “early” has been variably defined as anywhere from 24 hours to 5 days after either the onset of symptoms or the time of diagnosis. If a delayed or conservative treatment is selected, patients are treated during the acute phase with antibiotics, very occasionally patients undergo percutaneous cholecystostomy (placement of a tube in the gallbladder). Fifteen to 20% of patients who underwent delayed procedures had persistent or recurrent symptoms requiring intervention before the planned operation. Today early laparoscopic cholecystectomy is considered to be the treatment of choice for most patients.
Laparoscopic treatment of biliary peritonitis following complete division of posterior right lateral duct
Bile duct injury is a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early recognition and an adequate multidisciplinary approach are the cornerstones for the optimal final outcome. This video shows the laparoscopic management of biliary peritonitis after complete division of a posterior right lateral branch.

Discussion:
The incidence of accessory hepatic ducts is reported to range from 1.4% to 27% and has been found to range from 15% to 28% in autopsy series (1,2,3).
Injury of the extra-hepatic bile ducts (BDI) is the most serious complication when performing cholecystectomy, leading to biliary leakage and peritonitis. Treatment and prevention of this complication are essential in the management of gallstone diseases. The incidence of this complication depends on local inflammation at the hepatoduodenal ligament, on the type of approach used, and on the experience of the surgeon (4,5).
Injuries of tiny posterior aberrant ducts, which enter the main duct proximal to or within the cystic duct, may accidentally occur during surgery, causing partial or total segmental duct obstruction or bile leakage. Bile duct injuries can be split into five groups according to the mechanism of etiology or to the severity of the lesion.
The most commonly used classification of acute bile duct injuries (BDI) is the one proposed by Strasberg et al. (6):
Type A: bile leak from a minor duct still in contact with the common bile duct;
Type B: occlusion of part of the biliary tree;
Type C: bile leak from the duct not in contact with the common bile duct;
Type D: lateral injury to extra-hepatic bile duct;
Type E: circumferential injury of major bile ducts.
Here, the clinical case presents a type C lesion successfully managed through a conservative surgical approach.
References:
1. Seibert D, Matulis SR, Griswold F. A rare right hepatic duct anatomical variant discovered after laparoscopic bile duct transection. Surg Laparosc Endosc 1996;6:61-4.
2. Suhocki PV, Meyers WC. Injury to aberrant bile ducts during cholecystectomy: a common cause of diagnostic error and treatment delay. AJR Am J Roentgenol 1999;172:955-9.
3. Hirao K, Miyazaki A, Fujimoto T, Isomoto I, Hayashi K. Evaluation of aberrant bile ducts before laparoscopic cholecystectomy: helical CT cholangiography versus MR cholangiography. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2000;175:713-20.
4. Hugh TB. New strategies to prevent laparoscopic bile duct injury--surgeons can learn from pilots. Surgery 2002;132:826-35.
5. MacFadyen BV Jr, Vecchio R, Ricardo AE, Mathis CR. Bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: the United States experience. Surg Endosc 1998;12:315-21.
6. Strasberg SM, Hertl M, Soper NJ. An analysis of the problem of biliary injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. J Am Coll Surg 1995;180:101-25.
A D'Urso, D Mutter, J Leroy, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
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07:42
Laparoscopic treatment of biliary peritonitis following complete division of posterior right lateral duct
Bile duct injury is a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Early recognition and an adequate multidisciplinary approach are the cornerstones for the optimal final outcome. This video shows the laparoscopic management of biliary peritonitis after complete division of a posterior right lateral branch.

Discussion:
The incidence of accessory hepatic ducts is reported to range from 1.4% to 27% and has been found to range from 15% to 28% in autopsy series (1,2,3).
Injury of the extra-hepatic bile ducts (BDI) is the most serious complication when performing cholecystectomy, leading to biliary leakage and peritonitis. Treatment and prevention of this complication are essential in the management of gallstone diseases. The incidence of this complication depends on local inflammation at the hepatoduodenal ligament, on the type of approach used, and on the experience of the surgeon (4,5).
Injuries of tiny posterior aberrant ducts, which enter the main duct proximal to or within the cystic duct, may accidentally occur during surgery, causing partial or total segmental duct obstruction or bile leakage. Bile duct injuries can be split into five groups according to the mechanism of etiology or to the severity of the lesion.
The most commonly used classification of acute bile duct injuries (BDI) is the one proposed by Strasberg et al. (6):
Type A: bile leak from a minor duct still in contact with the common bile duct;
Type B: occlusion of part of the biliary tree;
Type C: bile leak from the duct not in contact with the common bile duct;
Type D: lateral injury to extra-hepatic bile duct;
Type E: circumferential injury of major bile ducts.
Here, the clinical case presents a type C lesion successfully managed through a conservative surgical approach.
References:
1. Seibert D, Matulis SR, Griswold F. A rare right hepatic duct anatomical variant discovered after laparoscopic bile duct transection. Surg Laparosc Endosc 1996;6:61-4.
2. Suhocki PV, Meyers WC. Injury to aberrant bile ducts during cholecystectomy: a common cause of diagnostic error and treatment delay. AJR Am J Roentgenol 1999;172:955-9.
3. Hirao K, Miyazaki A, Fujimoto T, Isomoto I, Hayashi K. Evaluation of aberrant bile ducts before laparoscopic cholecystectomy: helical CT cholangiography versus MR cholangiography. AJR Am J Roentgenol 2000;175:713-20.
4. Hugh TB. New strategies to prevent laparoscopic bile duct injury--surgeons can learn from pilots. Surgery 2002;132:826-35.
5. MacFadyen BV Jr, Vecchio R, Ricardo AE, Mathis CR. Bile duct injury after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: the United States experience. Surg Endosc 1998;12:315-21.
6. Strasberg SM, Hertl M, Soper NJ. An analysis of the problem of biliary injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. J Am Coll Surg 1995;180:101-25.