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Max HAERLE

Orthopädische Klinik Markgröningen
Markgröningen, Germany
MD
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Arthroscopic proximal pole resection, partial scaphoid implant
Proximal pole necrosis of the scaphoid can occur after scaphoid fractures. The replacement of the proximal pole has been tried using many different materials for many years, according to the literature. This technique consists in an arthroscopic debridement of the proximal scaphoid pole, leaving the local ligaments as intact as possible. The proximal pole is substituted by a pyrolitic carbon implant, which has an ovoid shape and fits well into this position. We present the technique and the results of 23 of Prof. Christophe Mathoulin’s patients treated between 1998 and 2007 with 21 good results and only one palmar implant dislocation. Even though good results have been already published in the literature, these results seem closely related to the degree of instability, created by the ligament damage in the scapho-lunate area.

This treatment is therefore a salvage procedure more indicated in elderly people than in young people. On the other hand, it can be a simple and convenient waiting therapy option in other cases.
M Haerle
Lecture
7 years ago
195 views
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07:15
Arthroscopic proximal pole resection, partial scaphoid implant
Proximal pole necrosis of the scaphoid can occur after scaphoid fractures. The replacement of the proximal pole has been tried using many different materials for many years, according to the literature. This technique consists in an arthroscopic debridement of the proximal scaphoid pole, leaving the local ligaments as intact as possible. The proximal pole is substituted by a pyrolitic carbon implant, which has an ovoid shape and fits well into this position. We present the technique and the results of 23 of Prof. Christophe Mathoulin’s patients treated between 1998 and 2007 with 21 good results and only one palmar implant dislocation. Even though good results have been already published in the literature, these results seem closely related to the degree of instability, created by the ligament damage in the scapho-lunate area.

This treatment is therefore a salvage procedure more indicated in elderly people than in young people. On the other hand, it can be a simple and convenient waiting therapy option in other cases.
Scaphoid Trapezium Pyrocarbon Implant (STPI) in scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT) arthritis
STT arthritis is a well-known problem generated idiopathically or secondary to a greater mobility of the scaphoid, for example after scapho-lunate ligament lesions. In these cases, the pure resection of the STT joint would add more instability to the whole system. Therefore, alternatively to the simple resection arthroplasty, the prosthetic augmentation has been proposed. We report the experience with a pyrocarbone convex-concave-shaped prosthesis, which adapts anatomically in the STT joint. After the arthroscopic resection of the distal scaphoid pole, the pyrocarbone implant can be positioned. Three weeks of immobilization seem convenient. In a series of 15 Prof. Christophe Mathoulin’s patients, very good results were achieved after a 39-month follow-up period. Two cases failed because of incomplete resection, especially at the most medial side towards the capitate, which should be approached in this area with accuracy. Arthroscopic resection and pyrocarbone prosthesis have provided very good results in isolated STT arthritis, but remain a new therapeutic option whose validity will have to be proven over the next years.
M Haerle
Lecture
7 years ago
261 views
4 likes
0 comments
05:07
Scaphoid Trapezium Pyrocarbon Implant (STPI) in scaphotrapeziotrapezoidal (STT) arthritis
STT arthritis is a well-known problem generated idiopathically or secondary to a greater mobility of the scaphoid, for example after scapho-lunate ligament lesions. In these cases, the pure resection of the STT joint would add more instability to the whole system. Therefore, alternatively to the simple resection arthroplasty, the prosthetic augmentation has been proposed. We report the experience with a pyrocarbone convex-concave-shaped prosthesis, which adapts anatomically in the STT joint. After the arthroscopic resection of the distal scaphoid pole, the pyrocarbone implant can be positioned. Three weeks of immobilization seem convenient. In a series of 15 Prof. Christophe Mathoulin’s patients, very good results were achieved after a 39-month follow-up period. Two cases failed because of incomplete resection, especially at the most medial side towards the capitate, which should be approached in this area with accuracy. Arthroscopic resection and pyrocarbone prosthesis have provided very good results in isolated STT arthritis, but remain a new therapeutic option whose validity will have to be proven over the next years.
Arthroscopic Wafer procedure: abrasion of the distal ulnar head in ulnocarpal conflicts
The ulnocarpal conflict is not a rare condition and should be taken into account in the event of ulnocarpal pain. The conflict is created by too narrow a space of the ulnar head and the ulnar edge of the lunate and the triquetrum. During loading and ulnar deviation of the wrist, a direct contact between these bones is produced. This leads to degenerative changes on the cartilage and produces pain. The origin may be a congenital positive ulnar situation, or a trauma impairing the natural leveling of the forearm bones. We distinguish a fresh traumatic condition (ulnar impaction syndrome) from a chronic condition (ulnar impingement syndrome). The midcarpal bones may also suffer from a similar condition, which is the hamate tip syndrome.
Diagnosis is made by clinical examination including the ulnocarpal stress test, standard X-rays, MRI enhanced with endovenous contrast and subsequent wrist arthroscopy.

Therapeutic options include the ulnar shortening osteotomy and the resection of the distal head of the ulna. Decision can be made depending on the state of the TFCC, the age of the patient and the collateral changes in the wrist. If the lesion occurs in young patients without any concomitant lesion, a shortening osteotomy is more often chosen.

In all other conditions, the less invasive choice for the minimal resection of the distal ulnar head is made by arthroscopic and open surgery. The camera is introduced through the 3-4 portal and the burr through the 6R portal. At the beginning, a 3.5 burr —in more trained hands a 4.2 burr— is used to resect about 2-3 mm of the distal ulnar head during supination and pronation movements. Care is taken not to resect the foveal area or the DRUJ.

After the operation, a comfort splint can be adapted for 3-4 days, and immediate physiotherapy is initiated.
M Haerle
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
692 views
8 likes
0 comments
08:57
Arthroscopic Wafer procedure: abrasion of the distal ulnar head in ulnocarpal conflicts
The ulnocarpal conflict is not a rare condition and should be taken into account in the event of ulnocarpal pain. The conflict is created by too narrow a space of the ulnar head and the ulnar edge of the lunate and the triquetrum. During loading and ulnar deviation of the wrist, a direct contact between these bones is produced. This leads to degenerative changes on the cartilage and produces pain. The origin may be a congenital positive ulnar situation, or a trauma impairing the natural leveling of the forearm bones. We distinguish a fresh traumatic condition (ulnar impaction syndrome) from a chronic condition (ulnar impingement syndrome). The midcarpal bones may also suffer from a similar condition, which is the hamate tip syndrome.
Diagnosis is made by clinical examination including the ulnocarpal stress test, standard X-rays, MRI enhanced with endovenous contrast and subsequent wrist arthroscopy.

Therapeutic options include the ulnar shortening osteotomy and the resection of the distal head of the ulna. Decision can be made depending on the state of the TFCC, the age of the patient and the collateral changes in the wrist. If the lesion occurs in young patients without any concomitant lesion, a shortening osteotomy is more often chosen.

In all other conditions, the less invasive choice for the minimal resection of the distal ulnar head is made by arthroscopic and open surgery. The camera is introduced through the 3-4 portal and the burr through the 6R portal. At the beginning, a 3.5 burr —in more trained hands a 4.2 burr— is used to resect about 2-3 mm of the distal ulnar head during supination and pronation movements. Care is taken not to resect the foveal area or the DRUJ.

After the operation, a comfort splint can be adapted for 3-4 days, and immediate physiotherapy is initiated.
Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia
The origin and the physiopathology of wrist ganglia are still debated. We know for sure that most of them have a common origin on the dorsal aspect of the wrist capsule in correspondence to the scapholunate ligament. The most common explanation is that there is a valve mechanism at the base of the ganglion, which controls the variable volume of these ganglions.
Therefore, the ganglion can be healed by resecting this valve mechanism at the capsular level. Resecting greater parts of the dorsal wrist capsule can often lead to joint stiffness and secondary weakness of the dorsal capsule.
Therefore, the arthroscopic resection of the ganglion stalk will heal the ganglion using a minimally invasive technique and hence avoiding the disadvantages of open surgery.
Technically speaking, a diagnostic wrist arthroscopy is performed through the ulnocarpal portals. This allows to eliminate any co-existing pathology. It also allows to see whether the stalk of the ganglion is in an ulnocarpal or a radiocarpal position.
A shaver is then introduced through the ganglion itself into the stalk, and intensive shaving is performed at the dorsal capsule in correspondence to the origin of the ganglion. Complete resection can thereby be achieved. Special postoperative care or splinting is not necessary. Mobilization can be started immediately.
M Haerle
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1054 views
14 likes
0 comments
05:22
Arthroscopic resection of dorsal wrist ganglia
The origin and the physiopathology of wrist ganglia are still debated. We know for sure that most of them have a common origin on the dorsal aspect of the wrist capsule in correspondence to the scapholunate ligament. The most common explanation is that there is a valve mechanism at the base of the ganglion, which controls the variable volume of these ganglions.
Therefore, the ganglion can be healed by resecting this valve mechanism at the capsular level. Resecting greater parts of the dorsal wrist capsule can often lead to joint stiffness and secondary weakness of the dorsal capsule.
Therefore, the arthroscopic resection of the ganglion stalk will heal the ganglion using a minimally invasive technique and hence avoiding the disadvantages of open surgery.
Technically speaking, a diagnostic wrist arthroscopy is performed through the ulnocarpal portals. This allows to eliminate any co-existing pathology. It also allows to see whether the stalk of the ganglion is in an ulnocarpal or a radiocarpal position.
A shaver is then introduced through the ganglion itself into the stalk, and intensive shaving is performed at the dorsal capsule in correspondence to the origin of the ganglion. Complete resection can thereby be achieved. Special postoperative care or splinting is not necessary. Mobilization can be started immediately.