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Silvana PERRETTA

Hôpitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg
Strasbourg, France
MD, PhD
8.8K likes
277.1K views
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Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
Gf Donatelli, S Perretta, M Ignat, M Pizzicannella, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
212 views
2 likes
0 comments
14:45
Endoscopic internal drainage of gastric fistula after sleeve gastrectomy
Gastric fistula is a major adverse event after sleeve gastrectomy.
In this live instructional video, authors present the case of a 45-year-old woman with a complex postoperative course after sleeve gastrectomy due to a gastric leakage and a twisted stomach. The patient had already been managed with the endoscopic placement of a fully covered metal stent and a percutaneous drainage with no resolution of the fistula.
The first step of the procedure consists in the removal of a 16cm fully covered stent using a grasper. After contrast injection, the leakage and the gastric twist are visualized. Under fluoroscopic control, a 30mm pneumatic dilatation of the twist is obtained. Two double pigtail plastic stents are placed between the stomach and the abscess cavity in order to achieve internal drainage and facilitate the healing process. The percutaneous drainage will be removed one day after the procedure while the plastic stents will be removed after 3 months.
EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis with HOT AXIOS® stent after Whipple pancreatectomy, filling blind loop through percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage
A 67-year-old woman underwent a Whipple pancreatectomy for cancer one year earlier. She was readmitted to hospital for abdominal pain and subocclusion with jaundice. CT-scan showed a dilatation of the jejunal stump with associated biliary tree dilatation. Percutaneous biliary transhepatic drainage (PBTHD) was performed and a stenosis was diagnosed in the afferent loop, accountable for subocclusion and secondary jaundice. Two double pigtails were delivered by the interventional radiologist through PBTHD across the jejunal stricture without resolution of symptoms. Biliary drainage was left in place causing patient discomfort. EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis (GJA) using the HOT AXIOS® stent was attempted in order to bypass the stricture. EUS allows to find the jejunal stump, detected by mechanical staple line visualization. Additionally, the blind loop was detected as it was filled up with liquid and contrast through the PBTHD. The HOT AXIOS® stent was delivered without any complications (VIDEO). Afterwards, flow of bile and liquid was observed through the lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS). PBTHD was immediately removed. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on a normal diet with no pain on the following day. EUS-GJA via a LAMS is a well-described technique in experts’ hands (Technical review of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided gastroenterostomy in 2017. Itoi T, Baron TH, Khashab MA, et al. Dig Endosc 2017;29:495-502). Special skills and techniques are necessary in order to recognize the exact small bowel loop to puncture (Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience. Tyberg A, Perez-Miranda M, Sanchez-Ocaña R et al. Endosc Int Open 2016;4:E276-81). In that case, we show that filling this loop using a previous transhepatic access should be considered an alternative in case of alterated anatomy. Also direct EUS transgastric injection of contrast medium in the dilated biliary tree to fill up the jejunal stump could be considered an option to perform GJA by a single operator in a single session after safely recognizing the right loop. In addition, fluoroscopy helps to detect the exact loop puncture site. In conclusion, GJA using a LAMS is feasible, safe and useful, and transhepatic injection of liquid and contrast medium helps to adequately recognize the jejunal stump after biliopancreatic surgery.
Gf Donatelli, G Pourcher, D Fuks, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, M Pizzicannella
Surgical intervention
1 month ago
42 views
2 likes
0 comments
02:30
EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis with HOT AXIOS® stent after Whipple pancreatectomy, filling blind loop through percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage
A 67-year-old woman underwent a Whipple pancreatectomy for cancer one year earlier. She was readmitted to hospital for abdominal pain and subocclusion with jaundice. CT-scan showed a dilatation of the jejunal stump with associated biliary tree dilatation. Percutaneous biliary transhepatic drainage (PBTHD) was performed and a stenosis was diagnosed in the afferent loop, accountable for subocclusion and secondary jaundice. Two double pigtails were delivered by the interventional radiologist through PBTHD across the jejunal stricture without resolution of symptoms. Biliary drainage was left in place causing patient discomfort. EUS gastrojejunal anastomosis (GJA) using the HOT AXIOS® stent was attempted in order to bypass the stricture. EUS allows to find the jejunal stump, detected by mechanical staple line visualization. Additionally, the blind loop was detected as it was filled up with liquid and contrast through the PBTHD. The HOT AXIOS® stent was delivered without any complications (VIDEO). Afterwards, flow of bile and liquid was observed through the lumen-apposing metal stent (LAMS). PBTHD was immediately removed. Recovery was uneventful and the patient was discharged on a normal diet with no pain on the following day. EUS-GJA via a LAMS is a well-described technique in experts’ hands (Technical review of endoscopic ultrasonography-guided gastroenterostomy in 2017. Itoi T, Baron TH, Khashab MA, et al. Dig Endosc 2017;29:495-502). Special skills and techniques are necessary in order to recognize the exact small bowel loop to puncture (Endoscopic ultrasound-guided gastrojejunostomy with a lumen-apposing metal stent: a multicenter, international experience. Tyberg A, Perez-Miranda M, Sanchez-Ocaña R et al. Endosc Int Open 2016;4:E276-81). In that case, we show that filling this loop using a previous transhepatic access should be considered an alternative in case of alterated anatomy. Also direct EUS transgastric injection of contrast medium in the dilated biliary tree to fill up the jejunal stump could be considered an option to perform GJA by a single operator in a single session after safely recognizing the right loop. In addition, fluoroscopy helps to detect the exact loop puncture site. In conclusion, GJA using a LAMS is feasible, safe and useful, and transhepatic injection of liquid and contrast medium helps to adequately recognize the jejunal stump after biliopancreatic surgery.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esojejunal anastomosis.
WJ Hyung, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 months ago
1383 views
5 likes
0 comments
04:27
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: robotic total gastrectomy highlighting esojejunal anastomosis
This video presents the case of a 71-year-old man with a BMI of 29. He was admitted to the emergency room for fatigue, severe anemia, and abdominal pain. His past medical history was significant for cardiac disease, aortic valve stenosis, and small adrenal adenoma. His past surgical history included a cholecystectomy and a prostatectomy. Work-up started with an endoscopy which showed an ulcer at the antrum, which was biopsied and showed signet cell adenocarcinoma. CT-scan confirmed the presence of a large bulky lesion and ruled out the presence of a metastatic disease. The patient was admitted again for bleeding and hematemesis and he was scheduled for a total gastrectomy. He had an exploratory laparoscopy which showed no signs of carcinomatosis. He also had preoperative chemotherapy.
This live interactive video demonstrates a robotic total gastrectomy for gastric cancer, including a stepwise lymphadenectomy and precise thorough description of esojejunal anastomosis.
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, B Seeliger, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
11 months ago
946 views
351 likes
0 comments
21:18
Fourth antireflux procedure in a patient with a BMI of 35: esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy
We present an esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy as the fourth antireflux procedure in an obese patient with recurrent severe GERD despite high-dose PPI therapy. After previous Nissen fundoplications and a redo procedure with a partial posterior fundoplication, the patient now presented with an intrathoracic migration of the posterior fundoplication. In these complex redo scenarios in conjunction with a high BMI, the strategy of esophagogastric disconnection and Roux-en-Y reconstruction similarly to obesity surgery is increasingly being used.
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, R Araujo
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
4977 views
595 likes
1 comment
38:09
Laparoscopic pancreatectomy with preservation of splenic vessels: a live broadcast from IRCAD America Latina, Barretos, Brazil
In this instructional video, Dr. Bernard Dallemagne demonstrated the main principles and key steps of laparoscopic pancreatectomy with the preservation of splenic vessels (Kimura technique) in a 58-year-old woman with a complex cyst of the body and tail of the pancreas. He briefly described the technical aspects and maneuvers for a better exposure and dissection of the inferior and superior border of the pancreas. He highlighted the tips and tricks for opening the gastrocolic ligament, the identification and dissection of vessels, the mobilization of the pancreas, dissection line reinforcement, and specimen removal.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: paraesophageal hernia repair: critical value of extrasaccular approach
Paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair is a challenging procedure. Repositioning of the herniated stomach and the reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory in order to decrease the risk of recurrence. The dissection and reduction of the sac must be performed following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it must be carried out outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Recurrence is also related to the type of crural repair performed, some authors advocating the systematic use of prosthetic or biological reinforcement. In this video, we present a PEH repair and cruroplasty protected with an absorbable mesh and contemporary Nissen fundoplication.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, M Diana, F Longo, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
5171 views
438 likes
0 comments
54:47
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: paraesophageal hernia repair: critical value of extrasaccular approach
Paraesophageal hernia (PEH) repair is a challenging procedure. Repositioning of the herniated stomach and the reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory in order to decrease the risk of recurrence. The dissection and reduction of the sac must be performed following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it must be carried out outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Recurrence is also related to the type of crural repair performed, some authors advocating the systematic use of prosthetic or biological reinforcement. In this video, we present a PEH repair and cruroplasty protected with an absorbable mesh and contemporary Nissen fundoplication.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy
A 65-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with complaints of dysphagia. She had a surgical history of cesarean section and cholecystectomy. Esophageal motility examination showed a normal lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and the absence of hiatal hernia and spasm in the distal part of the esophagus. The barium X-ray showed a bulky diverticulum in the middle thoracic esophagus and barium collecting inside the diverticulum without obstruction. The 3D-CT image also showed a giant diverticulum in the middle esophagus. The diverticulum was located below the azygos vein and carina of the bronchus and was sticking out from the middle esophagus in the contralateral side of the thoracic aorta. The diverticulum does not invade other organs. The patient was then proposed for an elective surgery, a thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy in a prone position.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
1 year ago
1211 views
111 likes
0 comments
41:44
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy
A 65-year-old woman was referred to our hospital with complaints of dysphagia. She had a surgical history of cesarean section and cholecystectomy. Esophageal motility examination showed a normal lower esophageal sphincter (LES), and the absence of hiatal hernia and spasm in the distal part of the esophagus. The barium X-ray showed a bulky diverticulum in the middle thoracic esophagus and barium collecting inside the diverticulum without obstruction. The 3D-CT image also showed a giant diverticulum in the middle esophagus. The diverticulum was located below the azygos vein and carina of the bronchus and was sticking out from the middle esophagus in the contralateral side of the thoracic aorta. The diverticulum does not invade other organs. The patient was then proposed for an elective surgery, a thoracoscopic esophageal diverticulectomy and myotomy in a prone position.
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: POEM for type 2 achalasia and incidental esophageal leiomyoma
POEM (peroral endoscopic myotomy) is an emerging procedure, which has evolved from the era of NOTES. The most cardinal indication for POEM is achalasia of the cardia. Other indications include diffuse esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus, and surgically failed cases.
The steps of POEM include the following: mucosotomy, submucous tunnelling, myotomy, closure of mucosotomy.
The myotomy is started 2 to 3cm distal to the mucosotomy and is continued to the end of the tunnel at 2 to 3cm distally to the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). A partial myotomy is most commonly performed by means of careful dissection of circular fibers, hence avoiding longitudinal fibers to prevent entry into the mediastinum. The mucosotomy is then closed to prevent any leakage with the use of endoscopic clips or of an endoscopic suturing device. About the EndoFLIP™ (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) Imaging System: this is a functional endoluminal imaging probe, which helps in the assessment of gastroesophageal junction distensibility and compliance after the procedure.
Complications of POEM:
Inadvertent mucosotomy is the most common complication.
Complications due to insufflation (pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum) can be controlled by using carbon dioxide for insufflation. Esophageal leak is the most dreaded complication with rates ranging from 0 to 5.6%.
H Inoue, S Perretta
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
980 views
32 likes
0 comments
31:42
LIVE INTERACTIVE SURGERY: POEM for type 2 achalasia and incidental esophageal leiomyoma
POEM (peroral endoscopic myotomy) is an emerging procedure, which has evolved from the era of NOTES. The most cardinal indication for POEM is achalasia of the cardia. Other indications include diffuse esophageal spasm, jackhammer esophagus, and surgically failed cases.
The steps of POEM include the following: mucosotomy, submucous tunnelling, myotomy, closure of mucosotomy.
The myotomy is started 2 to 3cm distal to the mucosotomy and is continued to the end of the tunnel at 2 to 3cm distally to the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). A partial myotomy is most commonly performed by means of careful dissection of circular fibers, hence avoiding longitudinal fibers to prevent entry into the mediastinum. The mucosotomy is then closed to prevent any leakage with the use of endoscopic clips or of an endoscopic suturing device. About the EndoFLIP™ (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) Imaging System: this is a functional endoluminal imaging probe, which helps in the assessment of gastroesophageal junction distensibility and compliance after the procedure.
Complications of POEM:
Inadvertent mucosotomy is the most common complication.
Complications due to insufflation (pneumomediastinum, pneumoperitoneum) can be controlled by using carbon dioxide for insufflation. Esophageal leak is the most dreaded complication with rates ranging from 0 to 5.6%.
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
3 years ago
882 views
31 likes
0 comments
12:26
Upper GI obstruction due to incarcerated recurrent hiatal hernia with mesh repair
This is the case of a 46-year-old woman with a BMI of 43 who presented to our clinic complaining of aphasia. Her past medical history is significant for a hiatal hernia repair and a diaphragmatic mesh reinforcement performed in July 2013. After surgery, she complained of dysphagia even after the three postoperative months, and the upper GI series showed a recurrence of her hiatal hernia. The dysphagia got worse, and in January 2015, a CT-scan showed a complete blockage of the gastroesophageal junction due to the herniation of the stomach. A 5-trocar technique was used, very similar to what we would use for a Nissen fundoplication.
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, S Tzedakis, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
7840 views
278 likes
1 comment
16:21
Type III hiatal hernia: stepwise laparoscopic treatment
The surgical treatment of type III hiatal hernia has been thoroughly standardized in the following order: extrasaccular approach, reduction of the entire sac, and esophageal mobilization in order to restore the esophagogastric anatomy. Although it is recommended to combine this with a fundoplication as most authors do, there is still controversy concerning the closure technique of the diaphragmatic defect. Some experts recommend the reinforcement of this closure by means of a synthetic mesh. It is, however, a method which does not prevent recurrence and which can also bring about complications, which can at times be disastrous. As a result, we privilege reinforcement using an absorbable mesh.
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.
L Marx, S Tzedakis, HA Mercoli, S Perretta, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1467 views
46 likes
0 comments
09:21
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass redo after sleeve gastrectomy associated with intrathoracic sleeve migration
Sleeve gastrectomy is a standard procedure in bariatric surgery nowadays. However, common contraindications involve the presence of gastroesophageal reflux and hiatal hernia. Here, we present the case of a morbidly obese female patient with a past surgical history of a Nissen fundoplication reversed in 2012 because of dysphagia. A sleeve gastrectomy had been performed 2 years ago complicated by an intrathoracic migration and gastric twist as discovered in the preoperative control followed by dysphagia, reflux, and vomiting. A conversion to a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass has been decided upon.
Collis Nissen procedure after lung transplantation and laparoscopic management of mediastinal hematoma
After lung transplantation, GERD causes inflammatory reactions, increasing risks for obliterating bronchiolitis and dysfunctioning graft. Authors first present a laparoscopic Collis Nissen procedure for hiatal hernia and severe esophagitis in a grafted patient. Because of a short esophagus despite extended dissection, a Collis gastroplasty is required. After stapling, cruroplasty is performed, finally followed by a Nissen fundoplication. In case of severe esophagitis, a difficult dissection and inflammatory tissues can lead to more complications such as leak, hemorrhage, slippage, and abscess. Mediastinal hematoma is diagnosed on postoperative day 9, mandating a redo emergency intervention. This rare complication will be managed laparoscopically.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, HA Mercoli, L Marx, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1695 views
58 likes
1 comment
21:07
Collis Nissen procedure after lung transplantation and laparoscopic management of mediastinal hematoma
After lung transplantation, GERD causes inflammatory reactions, increasing risks for obliterating bronchiolitis and dysfunctioning graft. Authors first present a laparoscopic Collis Nissen procedure for hiatal hernia and severe esophagitis in a grafted patient. Because of a short esophagus despite extended dissection, a Collis gastroplasty is required. After stapling, cruroplasty is performed, finally followed by a Nissen fundoplication. In case of severe esophagitis, a difficult dissection and inflammatory tissues can lead to more complications such as leak, hemorrhage, slippage, and abscess. Mediastinal hematoma is diagnosed on postoperative day 9, mandating a redo emergency intervention. This rare complication will be managed laparoscopically.
Endoscopic extraction of a giant cystic duct stone to treat type I Mirizzi syndrome
Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is characterized by common hepatic duct obstruction due to mechanical compression and surrounding inflammation by a gallstone impacted in the cystic duct (type I) or at the gallbladder neck (type II). Preoperative diagnosis of the syndrome is mandatory and associated with a decrease of complication rate of surgical management. Endoscopic therapies like ERCP with lithotripsy or endoscopic extraction of cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been described. Here we report successful endoscopic stone-clearance using double-cannulation and large balloon dilatation of the papilla for giant biliary stone impacted in the cystic duct inserted low in the common hepatic duct causing type I MS.
Bibliographic reference:
Double-cannulation and large papillary balloon dilation: key to successful endoscopic treatment of mirizzi syndrome in low insertion of cystic duct. Donatelli G, Dhumane P, Dallemagne B, Marx L, Delvaux M, Gay G, Marescaux J. Dig Endosc 2012;24:466-9.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, S Perretta, BM Vergeau, JL Dumont, T Tuszynski, B Meduri
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
869 views
13 likes
0 comments
04:09
Endoscopic extraction of a giant cystic duct stone to treat type I Mirizzi syndrome
Mirizzi syndrome (MS) is characterized by common hepatic duct obstruction due to mechanical compression and surrounding inflammation by a gallstone impacted in the cystic duct (type I) or at the gallbladder neck (type II). Preoperative diagnosis of the syndrome is mandatory and associated with a decrease of complication rate of surgical management. Endoscopic therapies like ERCP with lithotripsy or endoscopic extraction of cystic duct calculi followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy have been described. Here we report successful endoscopic stone-clearance using double-cannulation and large balloon dilatation of the papilla for giant biliary stone impacted in the cystic duct inserted low in the common hepatic duct causing type I MS.
Bibliographic reference:
Double-cannulation and large papillary balloon dilation: key to successful endoscopic treatment of mirizzi syndrome in low insertion of cystic duct. Donatelli G, Dhumane P, Dallemagne B, Marx L, Delvaux M, Gay G, Marescaux J. Dig Endosc 2012;24:466-9.
Onset of internal hernia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: laparoscopic management
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) represents the gold standard of treatment for morbidly obese patients. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, certain complications of this operation present difficult clinical problems. The most challenging complication to determine is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects.

Internal hernias occur more frequently in LRYGB than in the open procedure. This is a significant clinical problem since internal hernia is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO) after LRYGB, which can result in ischemia or infarction and often requires a reoperation.

The incidence of SBO after LGBP is reported to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The most common site of internal hernia after LGBP is at Petersen’s space.
In this video, we present the laparoscopic management of a complete small bowel herniation at Petersen’s space.
A D'Urso, S Perretta, M Vix, D Mutter, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1250 views
17 likes
0 comments
11:25
Onset of internal hernia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: laparoscopic management
Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) represents the gold standard of treatment for morbidly obese patients. While the laparoscopic approach offers many advantages in terms of fewer wound complications, decreased length of hospital stay, and decreased postoperative pain, certain complications of this operation present difficult clinical problems. The most challenging complication to determine is internal hernia through one of the mesenteric defects.

Internal hernias occur more frequently in LRYGB than in the open procedure. This is a significant clinical problem since internal hernia is the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO) after LRYGB, which can result in ischemia or infarction and often requires a reoperation.

The incidence of SBO after LGBP is reported to be between 1.8 and 9.7%. The most common site of internal hernia after LGBP is at Petersen’s space.
In this video, we present the laparoscopic management of a complete small bowel herniation at Petersen’s space.
Hybrid laparoscopic transgastric GIST resection
Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) are rare digestive tract tumors with an annual incidence of 6.5 to 14.5 cases per million, accounting for less than 1% of gastrointestinal tumors. They are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms with a biological behavior that is dictated by their size and histological grade and ranging between benign and malignant. They are of particular interest for being the first tumors to have a molecular targeted therapy custom made for them, Imatinib mesylate.

Surgical resection with curative intent is the primary treatment for all patients with localized and potentially resectable GIST. A complete excision of the lesion should be intended and a R0 microscopic limit verified. Minimally invasive procedures are especially of interest in order to achieve the best oncologic and functional results for the patient.

In this video, we present a hybrid endoscopic/laparoscopic excision of a gastric GIST in an elderly and frail patient. Its location in the posterior gastric wall near the lesser curvature made a local excision by laparoscopy uncertain for injury of the coronary gastric vessels. It would be also difficult to evaluate the properness of the resection margin. The procedure was safely performed by a combined surgical team working in parallel laparoscopically and endoscopically. The functional result was excellent and the pathology confirmed the complete R0 resection of the GIST.
S Perretta, D Ntourakis, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
4 years ago
1853 views
54 likes
0 comments
06:43
Hybrid laparoscopic transgastric GIST resection
Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors (GIST) are rare digestive tract tumors with an annual incidence of 6.5 to 14.5 cases per million, accounting for less than 1% of gastrointestinal tumors. They are the most common mesenchymal neoplasms with a biological behavior that is dictated by their size and histological grade and ranging between benign and malignant. They are of particular interest for being the first tumors to have a molecular targeted therapy custom made for them, Imatinib mesylate.

Surgical resection with curative intent is the primary treatment for all patients with localized and potentially resectable GIST. A complete excision of the lesion should be intended and a R0 microscopic limit verified. Minimally invasive procedures are especially of interest in order to achieve the best oncologic and functional results for the patient.

In this video, we present a hybrid endoscopic/laparoscopic excision of a gastric GIST in an elderly and frail patient. Its location in the posterior gastric wall near the lesser curvature made a local excision by laparoscopy uncertain for injury of the coronary gastric vessels. It would be also difficult to evaluate the properness of the resection margin. The procedure was safely performed by a combined surgical team working in parallel laparoscopically and endoscopically. The functional result was excellent and the pathology confirmed the complete R0 resection of the GIST.
Laparoscopic partial fundoplication in a patient with scleroderma and severe GERD
Scleroderma is associated with severe esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results after antireflux surgery have been suboptimal due to the profound esophageal dysmotility observed in this disease.

Here, we show the case of a 54-year-old patient with scleroderma and severe GERD. The patient presented with both typical GERD symptoms, persistent cough unresponsive to high dose of PPIs, and dysphagia to solids. Preoperative work-up included high-resolution (HR) manometry, which showed a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and severely impaired peristalsis as well as impedance pH monitoring, which confirmed the presence of pathological reflux, mainly acid, occurring mostly at night in a recumbent position.
S Perretta, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
3387 views
35 likes
0 comments
09:11
Laparoscopic partial fundoplication in a patient with scleroderma and severe GERD
Scleroderma is associated with severe esophageal dysmotility and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Results after antireflux surgery have been suboptimal due to the profound esophageal dysmotility observed in this disease.

Here, we show the case of a 54-year-old patient with scleroderma and severe GERD. The patient presented with both typical GERD symptoms, persistent cough unresponsive to high dose of PPIs, and dysphagia to solids. Preoperative work-up included high-resolution (HR) manometry, which showed a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter and severely impaired peristalsis as well as impedance pH monitoring, which confirmed the presence of pathological reflux, mainly acid, occurring mostly at night in a recumbent position.
POEM endoscopic treatment of achalasia using the EndoFLIP® (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) imaging system
This is the case of a 75-year-old lady who presented with recurrent symptoms of dysphagia and regurgitation associated with a significant weight loss due to recurrent achalasia. She developed progressive recurrence after a first surgical treatment by an open Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication back in 1974. This first operation was complicated by an esophageal perforation which required a thoracotomy to be controlled. Several dilatations were attempted with no significant symptoms improvement. One of the most important aspects of POEM is to ensure that the submucosal tunnel adequately extends into the gastric cardia in order to perform a complete and adequate myotomy. To this aim, proper orientation is key but may be difficult even to the experienced eye of the interventional endoscopist familiar with ESD techniques and dissection planes. Six endoscopic cues that assist with this determination have been identified so far. The most useful cue was deemed to be the characteristic appearance of the submucosal space of the cardia of a slightly different color with a somewhat yellowish hue, more capacious than the esophageal submucosal space with more and larger vessels. Identification of the thick, cord-like circular muscle fibers of the lower esophageal sphincter was deemed as the second most useful cue, and noting a bluish coloration of the cardial mucosa from the colored submucosal injection via a retroflexed luminal view was the third most useful cue. Endoscope insertion length within the submucosal tunnel and the palisading mucosal vessels marking the gastroesophageal junction and visible also from inside the submucosal tunnel were deemed helpful but to a lesser degree. Nevertheless, identification of these endoscopic landmarks is not easy nor always reproducible. Creation of the submucosal tunnel is very sensitive to case difficulty and accounts for the large fluctuations in procedure time. Another area of technique variability involves the orientation of the myotomy. In order to improve the recognition of the essential landmarks, we developed a myotomy technique guided by the EndoFLIP® catheter. EndoFLIP® is a unique physiology test that uses both volumetric assessment and pressure readings to calculate compliance and high pressure zones as well as distensibility changes at the gastroesophageal junction. It allows intraoperative assessment of myotomy completion. The use of this device provides a direct immediate feedback with regards to the efficacy of the myotomy. The EndoFLIP® catheter used in this case (EF-325L) has been specifically modified for the POEM procedure. It differs from the standard EndoFLIP® catheter in that it contains an integrated illuminating LED adjacent to the centre measurement electrode. When the catheter is positioned intraluminally at the gastroesophageal junction and secured to this position taping the distal end to the endothracheal tube, it allows to direct dissection towards the cardia.
S Perretta, LL Swanström, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2753 views
39 likes
0 comments
07:08
POEM endoscopic treatment of achalasia using the EndoFLIP® (Endolumenal Functional Lumen Imaging Probe) imaging system
This is the case of a 75-year-old lady who presented with recurrent symptoms of dysphagia and regurgitation associated with a significant weight loss due to recurrent achalasia. She developed progressive recurrence after a first surgical treatment by an open Heller myotomy and Dor fundoplication back in 1974. This first operation was complicated by an esophageal perforation which required a thoracotomy to be controlled. Several dilatations were attempted with no significant symptoms improvement. One of the most important aspects of POEM is to ensure that the submucosal tunnel adequately extends into the gastric cardia in order to perform a complete and adequate myotomy. To this aim, proper orientation is key but may be difficult even to the experienced eye of the interventional endoscopist familiar with ESD techniques and dissection planes. Six endoscopic cues that assist with this determination have been identified so far. The most useful cue was deemed to be the characteristic appearance of the submucosal space of the cardia of a slightly different color with a somewhat yellowish hue, more capacious than the esophageal submucosal space with more and larger vessels. Identification of the thick, cord-like circular muscle fibers of the lower esophageal sphincter was deemed as the second most useful cue, and noting a bluish coloration of the cardial mucosa from the colored submucosal injection via a retroflexed luminal view was the third most useful cue. Endoscope insertion length within the submucosal tunnel and the palisading mucosal vessels marking the gastroesophageal junction and visible also from inside the submucosal tunnel were deemed helpful but to a lesser degree. Nevertheless, identification of these endoscopic landmarks is not easy nor always reproducible. Creation of the submucosal tunnel is very sensitive to case difficulty and accounts for the large fluctuations in procedure time. Another area of technique variability involves the orientation of the myotomy. In order to improve the recognition of the essential landmarks, we developed a myotomy technique guided by the EndoFLIP® catheter. EndoFLIP® is a unique physiology test that uses both volumetric assessment and pressure readings to calculate compliance and high pressure zones as well as distensibility changes at the gastroesophageal junction. It allows intraoperative assessment of myotomy completion. The use of this device provides a direct immediate feedback with regards to the efficacy of the myotomy. The EndoFLIP® catheter used in this case (EF-325L) has been specifically modified for the POEM procedure. It differs from the standard EndoFLIP® catheter in that it contains an integrated illuminating LED adjacent to the centre measurement electrode. When the catheter is positioned intraluminally at the gastroesophageal junction and secured to this position taping the distal end to the endothracheal tube, it allows to direct dissection towards the cardia.
Laparoscopic redo Nissen for failed anterior fundoplication
Nissen fundoplication is the most commonly performed antireflux operation. An alternative is the partial fundoplication, either anterior or posterior to the esophagus, which provides adequate control of reflux. The anterior valve is effective, provided that it is properly constructed. It is not a simple fundic plication but it implies precise dissection parameters to create an effective antireflux mechanism. This video shows a redo fundoplication in a patient with an anterior fundoplication that never controlled GERD, because it was built as a simple fundic plication. This cause of failure is typical in inexperienced surgeons, who are afraid of doing a posterior dissection of the gastroesophageal junction. The video also demonstrates the management of a peri-splenic hemorrhage.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
2008 views
37 likes
0 comments
31:15
Laparoscopic redo Nissen for failed anterior fundoplication
Nissen fundoplication is the most commonly performed antireflux operation. An alternative is the partial fundoplication, either anterior or posterior to the esophagus, which provides adequate control of reflux. The anterior valve is effective, provided that it is properly constructed. It is not a simple fundic plication but it implies precise dissection parameters to create an effective antireflux mechanism. This video shows a redo fundoplication in a patient with an anterior fundoplication that never controlled GERD, because it was built as a simple fundic plication. This cause of failure is typical in inexperienced surgeons, who are afraid of doing a posterior dissection of the gastroesophageal junction. The video also demonstrates the management of a peri-splenic hemorrhage.
Laparoscopic stepwise approach of a tumor of the gastroesophageal junction
GISTs are rare neoplasms that account for less than 1% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. GISTs have the capability to become malignant and then metastasize, whereas leiomyomas are almost invariably benign. In clinical practice, preoperative differentiation between GISTs and leiomyomas is usually difficult, even if EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut biopsy is performed. Leiomyomas are rare in the stomach and duodenum while GIST are more frequent in the stomach.
This patient presented with a 6cm submucosal tumor below the gastroesophageal junction. This video demonstrates the stepwise laparoscopic approach taking into consideration the potentially (pre-)malignant nature of the tumor.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, S Mandala, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
5 years ago
1777 views
17 likes
0 comments
26:11
Laparoscopic stepwise approach of a tumor of the gastroesophageal junction
GISTs are rare neoplasms that account for less than 1% of all gastrointestinal malignancies. GISTs have the capability to become malignant and then metastasize, whereas leiomyomas are almost invariably benign. In clinical practice, preoperative differentiation between GISTs and leiomyomas is usually difficult, even if EUS-guided fine-needle aspiration or trucut biopsy is performed. Leiomyomas are rare in the stomach and duodenum while GIST are more frequent in the stomach.
This patient presented with a 6cm submucosal tumor below the gastroesophageal junction. This video demonstrates the stepwise laparoscopic approach taking into consideration the potentially (pre-)malignant nature of the tumor.
Challenges in GERD: Collis fundoplication in a patient with a BMI of 41
Obesity has long been considered a predisposing factor for gastroesophageal reflux. It is also thought to predispose patients to a poorer clinical outcome following antireflux surgery and some authors recommend gastric bypass in obese patient with symptomatic GERD. However, some studies reported that preoperative BMI does not influence the clinical outcome following laparoscopic antireflux surgery and concluded that obesity is not a contraindication for laparoscopic fundoplication (1, 2).
In this video, we present a Collis-Toupet gastroplasty in a woman with a BMI of 41.
References:
1. Winslow ER, Frisella MM, Soper NJ, Klingensmith ME. Obesity does not adversely affect the outcome of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS). Surgical Endoscopy 2003;17:2003-11.
2. Chisholm JA, Jamieson GG, Lally CJ, Devitt PG, Game PA, Watson DI. The effect of obesity on the outcome of laparoscopic antireflux surgery. J Gastrointest Surg 2009;13:1064-70.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1539 views
27 likes
0 comments
25:13
Challenges in GERD: Collis fundoplication in a patient with a BMI of 41
Obesity has long been considered a predisposing factor for gastroesophageal reflux. It is also thought to predispose patients to a poorer clinical outcome following antireflux surgery and some authors recommend gastric bypass in obese patient with symptomatic GERD. However, some studies reported that preoperative BMI does not influence the clinical outcome following laparoscopic antireflux surgery and concluded that obesity is not a contraindication for laparoscopic fundoplication (1, 2).
In this video, we present a Collis-Toupet gastroplasty in a woman with a BMI of 41.
References:
1. Winslow ER, Frisella MM, Soper NJ, Klingensmith ME. Obesity does not adversely affect the outcome of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS). Surgical Endoscopy 2003;17:2003-11.
2. Chisholm JA, Jamieson GG, Lally CJ, Devitt PG, Game PA, Watson DI. The effect of obesity on the outcome of laparoscopic antireflux surgery. J Gastrointest Surg 2009;13:1064-70.
Second reoperative antireflux procedure for valve slippage
Redo surgery is technically more demanding than primary fundoplication. In addition, anatomical defects that caused failure may increase technical difficulties. A recent review found that the average success rate after laparoscopic redo operations ranged from 65 to 100 per cent (van Beek D, Auyang E, Soper N. A comprehensive review of laparoscopic redo fundoplication. Surgical Endoscopy: Springer New York; 2010. p 1-7). However, our recent study showed that the failure rate after re-operation is increasing with time, and highlighted the need for accurate preoperative and intraoperative assessment of the causes of failure (Dallemagne B, Arenas Sanchez M, Francart D, Perretta S, Weerts J, Markiewicz S, et al. Long-term results after laparoscopic reoperation for failed antireflux procedures. Br J Surg 2011;98:1581-7). This video shows a third antireflux procedure in a patient presenting with slippage of the fundoplication.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J D'Agostino, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1399 views
15 likes
0 comments
29:04
Second reoperative antireflux procedure for valve slippage
Redo surgery is technically more demanding than primary fundoplication. In addition, anatomical defects that caused failure may increase technical difficulties. A recent review found that the average success rate after laparoscopic redo operations ranged from 65 to 100 per cent (van Beek D, Auyang E, Soper N. A comprehensive review of laparoscopic redo fundoplication. Surgical Endoscopy: Springer New York; 2010. p 1-7). However, our recent study showed that the failure rate after re-operation is increasing with time, and highlighted the need for accurate preoperative and intraoperative assessment of the causes of failure (Dallemagne B, Arenas Sanchez M, Francart D, Perretta S, Weerts J, Markiewicz S, et al. Long-term results after laparoscopic reoperation for failed antireflux procedures. Br J Surg 2011;98:1581-7). This video shows a third antireflux procedure in a patient presenting with slippage of the fundoplication.
Management of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication
Dysphagia is a normal observation after fundoplication for GERD. It usually lasts for 4 to 6 weeks and results from esophageal motility disorders related to the esophageal dissection and to the outlet obstruction created by the fundoplication. It is managed by appropriate diet. When dysphagia persists after 3 months, there is some concern and need for objective evaluation. This video shows the management of this type of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, during which a big hematoma developed on the wrap. This usually does not lead to any long-term problems but, in this patient, dysphagia persisted over a 3-month period of time and led to re-operation.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, T Piardi, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
1812 views
23 likes
0 comments
18:17
Management of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication
Dysphagia is a normal observation after fundoplication for GERD. It usually lasts for 4 to 6 weeks and results from esophageal motility disorders related to the esophageal dissection and to the outlet obstruction created by the fundoplication. It is managed by appropriate diet. When dysphagia persists after 3 months, there is some concern and need for objective evaluation. This video shows the management of this type of persisting dysphagia after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication, during which a big hematoma developed on the wrap. This usually does not lead to any long-term problems but, in this patient, dysphagia persisted over a 3-month period of time and led to re-operation.
Laparoscopic repair of giant type 4 paraesophageal hernia
Type 4 giant hiatal hernias are not common. The stomach is herniated, as well as viscera in the mediastinum, colon, spleen, and even sometimes in the pancreas. Repair is challenging for different reasons. This type of hernia is frequent in older and fragile patients. Reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory and must be carried out following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it has to be done outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Crural repair is challenging and must be tailored on the quality of the diaphragmatic musculature and size of the orifice. Anti-reflux repair must be performed as well. The laparoscopic approach has radically improved the clinical outcome of this procedure in old patients.
B Dallemagne, E Marzano, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
4723 views
79 likes
0 comments
21:43
Laparoscopic repair of giant type 4 paraesophageal hernia
Type 4 giant hiatal hernias are not common. The stomach is herniated, as well as viscera in the mediastinum, colon, spleen, and even sometimes in the pancreas. Repair is challenging for different reasons. This type of hernia is frequent in older and fragile patients. Reduction of the sac from the mediastinum is mandatory and must be carried out following stepwise and precise dissection rules: it has to be done outside of the sac, in an anatomical cleavage plane. Crural repair is challenging and must be tailored on the quality of the diaphragmatic musculature and size of the orifice. Anti-reflux repair must be performed as well. The laparoscopic approach has radically improved the clinical outcome of this procedure in old patients.
Esophageal peptic stricture and shortened esophagus managed by a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure
This video presents a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure performed in a 64-year-old man presenting with long-standing reflux disease and esophageal peptic stricture. The patient underwent several (>15) endoscopic dilatations that elicit only temporary improvement of dysphagia. Two esophageal stents were placed without significant improvement after removal. The patient was then referred to surgery. The treatment alternatives were esophagectomy or anti-reflux surgery associated with postoperative dilatations. The first choice was to perform an anti-reflux procedure in order to stop a mixed pathological reflux and reduce the risk of re-stricture. Three months after the procedure, an esophageal stent was placed to dilate the stricture.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, Gf Donatelli, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
6 years ago
3296 views
72 likes
0 comments
24:49
Esophageal peptic stricture and shortened esophagus managed by a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure
This video presents a laparoscopic Collis-Nissen procedure performed in a 64-year-old man presenting with long-standing reflux disease and esophageal peptic stricture. The patient underwent several (>15) endoscopic dilatations that elicit only temporary improvement of dysphagia. Two esophageal stents were placed without significant improvement after removal. The patient was then referred to surgery. The treatment alternatives were esophagectomy or anti-reflux surgery associated with postoperative dilatations. The first choice was to perform an anti-reflux procedure in order to stop a mixed pathological reflux and reduce the risk of re-stricture. Three months after the procedure, an esophageal stent was placed to dilate the stricture.
Management of transpyloric invagination of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are most commonly found in the stomach (40-70%), but can occur in all other parts of the GI tract, with 20 to 40% of GISTs arising in the small intestine and 5 to 15% from the colon and rectum.
They typically grow endophytically, parallel to the bowel lumen, commonly with overlying mucosal necrosis and ulceration. They also vary in size, from a few millimeters to 40cm in diameter. Many GISTs are well defined by a thin pseudo-capsule.
Over 95% of patients present with a solitary primary tumor, and in 10 to 40% of these cases, the tumor directly invades neighboring organs. Gastric GISTs are usually presented with GI bleeding and abdominal pain. However, most patients are symptom-free and the lesions are discovered incidentally during an upper endoscopy performed for other reasons (chronic abdominal pain and intermittent gastric obstruction in this patient).
Surgery remains the mainstay of curative treatment.
Surgical resection of localized gastric GISTs is the preferred treatment modality, as resection of the tumor renders the only chance for cure at this time. Historically, a 1 to 2cm margin was thought to be necessary for an adequate resection. However, more recently, DeMatteo et al. demonstrated that tumor size and not negative microscopic surgical margins determine survival.
It is therefore accepted that the surgical goal should be a complete resection with gross negative margins only.
Given this, wedge resection has been advocated by many investigators for the majority of gastric GISTs.
J D'Agostino, Gf Donatelli, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
2081 views
19 likes
0 comments
04:15
Management of transpyloric invagination of a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST)
Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the most common mesenchymal tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. GISTs are most commonly found in the stomach (40-70%), but can occur in all other parts of the GI tract, with 20 to 40% of GISTs arising in the small intestine and 5 to 15% from the colon and rectum.
They typically grow endophytically, parallel to the bowel lumen, commonly with overlying mucosal necrosis and ulceration. They also vary in size, from a few millimeters to 40cm in diameter. Many GISTs are well defined by a thin pseudo-capsule.
Over 95% of patients present with a solitary primary tumor, and in 10 to 40% of these cases, the tumor directly invades neighboring organs. Gastric GISTs are usually presented with GI bleeding and abdominal pain. However, most patients are symptom-free and the lesions are discovered incidentally during an upper endoscopy performed for other reasons (chronic abdominal pain and intermittent gastric obstruction in this patient).
Surgery remains the mainstay of curative treatment.
Surgical resection of localized gastric GISTs is the preferred treatment modality, as resection of the tumor renders the only chance for cure at this time. Historically, a 1 to 2cm margin was thought to be necessary for an adequate resection. However, more recently, DeMatteo et al. demonstrated that tumor size and not negative microscopic surgical margins determine survival.
It is therefore accepted that the surgical goal should be a complete resection with gross negative margins only.
Given this, wedge resection has been advocated by many investigators for the majority of gastric GISTs.
Management of a hiatal hernia during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: be ready to repair
Here we show the case of a 44-year-old woman with a BMI of 40.5 and a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease. She was presented for a weight reductive surgery evaluation. Preoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy, barium swallow and esophageal high resolution manometry were performed. They demonstrated a 3cm hiatal hernia as well as a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter.
The presence of a large hiatal hernia (greater than 5cm) is problematic and may prevent successful weight reductive surgery. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is an effective procedure to control symptoms and GERD complications in morbidly obese patients. For this reason, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a valid alternative to manage morbidly obese patients with symptomatic hiatal hernia and GERD.
Bsed on the preoperative work-up, decision was made to perform a concomitant paraesophageal hernia repair and a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.
S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1803 views
15 likes
0 comments
14:28
Management of a hiatal hernia during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: be ready to repair
Here we show the case of a 44-year-old woman with a BMI of 40.5 and a history of gastroesophageal reflux disease. She was presented for a weight reductive surgery evaluation. Preoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy, barium swallow and esophageal high resolution manometry were performed. They demonstrated a 3cm hiatal hernia as well as a hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter.
The presence of a large hiatal hernia (greater than 5cm) is problematic and may prevent successful weight reductive surgery. Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is an effective procedure to control symptoms and GERD complications in morbidly obese patients. For this reason, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is a valid alternative to manage morbidly obese patients with symptomatic hiatal hernia and GERD.
Bsed on the preoperative work-up, decision was made to perform a concomitant paraesophageal hernia repair and a laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.
Right colon Dieulafoy's lesion: endoscopic treatment
A 78-year-old man presenting with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding per rectum.
The hemoglobin level was 10.5 g/dL on admission. Given that the patient was hemodynamically stable, decision was made to perform an upper GI endoscopy and a total colonoscopy the following day after standard bowel preparation. Bleeding recurred during the night with a hemoglobin drop to 6.3g/dL, requiring transfusions of 3 Units of blood.
With no further delay, endoscopy was performed. The gastroscopy was normal but at colonoscopy old blood was visualized in the rectum, the sigmoid, and the left and transverse colon. Additional bright red blood was observed at the level of the right colon.
Gf Donatelli, S Perretta, B Dallemagne
Surgical intervention
7 years ago
1582 views
16 likes
1 comment
02:32
Right colon Dieulafoy's lesion: endoscopic treatment
A 78-year-old man presenting with chronic renal failure was admitted to the emergency department of our hospital for bleeding per rectum.
The hemoglobin level was 10.5 g/dL on admission. Given that the patient was hemodynamically stable, decision was made to perform an upper GI endoscopy and a total colonoscopy the following day after standard bowel preparation. Bleeding recurred during the night with a hemoglobin drop to 6.3g/dL, requiring transfusions of 3 Units of blood.
With no further delay, endoscopy was performed. The gastroscopy was normal but at colonoscopy old blood was visualized in the rectum, the sigmoid, and the left and transverse colon. Additional bright red blood was observed at the level of the right colon.
MRI lymphography for esophageal sentinel node mapping: evolution of a NOTES technique
Introduction: Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) may render conventionally inaccessible anatomic sites accessible in a truly minimally invasive means. Having developed expertise in esophageal mural tunneling for the purposes of endoscopic Heller’s myotomy, we now cautiously explore the feasibility of a transesophageal technique for sentinel node mapping based on MRI lymphography.
Methods: two non-survival porcine models were used to demonstrate how targeted mediastinal lymph node biopsy could be performed transesophageally by a combination of endoscopic submucosal lymphatic mapping, MRI imaging and NOTES.
First, lymphatic mapping of the area of interest is performed by injecting 2mls of methylene blue submucosally using a standard gastroscope inserted into the distal esophagus. This suspension of small molecular size dye particles is rapidly taken up by the submucosal lymphatic efferents and transported to the first echelon draining lymph nodes which are then detectable by their blue discoloration.
After a few minutes, the endoscope is withdrawn proximally to this injection site and a mucosal incision made 15cm from the EGJ to allow creation of a submucosal tunnel using a biliary soft tipped dilatation balloon. This along with the pressure of endoscopic CO2 insufflation allows a space to be formed within the esophageal wall. A second staggered incision then allows exit of the endoscope into the mediastinum proper. Once in this anatomic space, a careful search is performed for blue discolored lymph nodes whereupon standard endoscopic dissection instruments allows selective lymphadenectomy to be performed and the salient nodes withdrawn to the exterior via to esophagotomy. The small diameter of the scope allows for easy retroflection providing good visualization even of the proximal esophagus. The last step is mucosal clip closure to reinforce the mucosal flap seal. The retrieved nodes were MRI scanned to confirm the presence of gadolinium in the dyed nodes.
In the second animal the mapping was performed as described above but instead of retrieving only the sentinel nodes an en bloc esophagogastrectomy was performed to assess the sentinel nodes basin distribution at MRI.
Results: The operative technique proved readily feasible in all its aspects with blue sentinel nodes being found around the distal esophagus. The gadolinium combined with methylene blue was found in the first draining nodes in both animals.
Conclusions: MRI imaging may provide a new tool for sentinel node basin identification, and if proved sufficiently reliable, may represent a step further towards a solely endoscopic diagnosis and resection of the primary tumor.
S Perretta, M Diana, B Dallemagne, R Cahill, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
126 views
3 likes
0 comments
02:28
MRI lymphography for esophageal sentinel node mapping: evolution of a NOTES technique
Introduction: Natural Orifice Transluminal Endoscopic Surgery (NOTES) may render conventionally inaccessible anatomic sites accessible in a truly minimally invasive means. Having developed expertise in esophageal mural tunneling for the purposes of endoscopic Heller’s myotomy, we now cautiously explore the feasibility of a transesophageal technique for sentinel node mapping based on MRI lymphography.
Methods: two non-survival porcine models were used to demonstrate how targeted mediastinal lymph node biopsy could be performed transesophageally by a combination of endoscopic submucosal lymphatic mapping, MRI imaging and NOTES.
First, lymphatic mapping of the area of interest is performed by injecting 2mls of methylene blue submucosally using a standard gastroscope inserted into the distal esophagus. This suspension of small molecular size dye particles is rapidly taken up by the submucosal lymphatic efferents and transported to the first echelon draining lymph nodes which are then detectable by their blue discoloration.
After a few minutes, the endoscope is withdrawn proximally to this injection site and a mucosal incision made 15cm from the EGJ to allow creation of a submucosal tunnel using a biliary soft tipped dilatation balloon. This along with the pressure of endoscopic CO2 insufflation allows a space to be formed within the esophageal wall. A second staggered incision then allows exit of the endoscope into the mediastinum proper. Once in this anatomic space, a careful search is performed for blue discolored lymph nodes whereupon standard endoscopic dissection instruments allows selective lymphadenectomy to be performed and the salient nodes withdrawn to the exterior via to esophagotomy. The small diameter of the scope allows for easy retroflection providing good visualization even of the proximal esophagus. The last step is mucosal clip closure to reinforce the mucosal flap seal. The retrieved nodes were MRI scanned to confirm the presence of gadolinium in the dyed nodes.
In the second animal the mapping was performed as described above but instead of retrieving only the sentinel nodes an en bloc esophagogastrectomy was performed to assess the sentinel nodes basin distribution at MRI.
Results: The operative technique proved readily feasible in all its aspects with blue sentinel nodes being found around the distal esophagus. The gadolinium combined with methylene blue was found in the first draining nodes in both animals.
Conclusions: MRI imaging may provide a new tool for sentinel node basin identification, and if proved sufficiently reliable, may represent a step further towards a solely endoscopic diagnosis and resection of the primary tumor.
Collis Nissen fundoplication in a patient with Barrett's esophagus
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic Collis esophageal lengthening procedure in a 65-year-old man with a 15-year history of typical GERD symptoms and Barrett’s esophagus. The identification and surgical management of the short esophagus are discussed as well as the technical steps required for a Collis gastroplasty. Given that the most common mode of failure of a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is herniation of the fundoplication into the chest, as our experience increases, we recognize that reduction of the gastroesophageal junction below the diaphragmatic hiatus without tension is problematic and foreshortening of the esophagus is a real entity. Patients who have Barrett’s esophagus must be considered at risk for having a short esophagus.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
3461 views
87 likes
0 comments
17:25
Collis Nissen fundoplication in a patient with Barrett's esophagus
This video demonstrates a laparoscopic Collis esophageal lengthening procedure in a 65-year-old man with a 15-year history of typical GERD symptoms and Barrett’s esophagus. The identification and surgical management of the short esophagus are discussed as well as the technical steps required for a Collis gastroplasty. Given that the most common mode of failure of a laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is herniation of the fundoplication into the chest, as our experience increases, we recognize that reduction of the gastroesophageal junction below the diaphragmatic hiatus without tension is problematic and foreshortening of the esophagus is a real entity. Patients who have Barrett’s esophagus must be considered at risk for having a short esophagus.
Laparoscopic redo Nissen for recurrent GERD not responding to PPIs
This video demonstrates a redo laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in a 34-year-old man with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. A first laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti procedure was performed ten years ago, and was taken down 2 months after surgery for severe dysphagia and important weight loss.
The success rate of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication depends on the proper creation of a floppy and symmetric wrap together with a suitable crural repair. Most failures and complications due to technical mistakes during antireflux surgeries are related to an incomplete or inadequate intraoperative evaluation of the wrap and crural repair. Development or persistence of dysphagia after fundoplication is among the most common complications occurring in up to 30% of patients. Surgical factors responsible for de novo dysphagia are mainly related to the degree, tightness, length of the fundoplication and technical errors leading to wrap misconstruction -below the anatomical gastroesophageal junction or by a distortion of the esophageal diameter and orientation at the level of the crural repair.
B Dallemagne, S Perretta, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
1535 views
27 likes
0 comments
09:41
Laparoscopic redo Nissen for recurrent GERD not responding to PPIs
This video demonstrates a redo laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in a 34-year-old man with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. A first laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti procedure was performed ten years ago, and was taken down 2 months after surgery for severe dysphagia and important weight loss.
The success rate of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication depends on the proper creation of a floppy and symmetric wrap together with a suitable crural repair. Most failures and complications due to technical mistakes during antireflux surgeries are related to an incomplete or inadequate intraoperative evaluation of the wrap and crural repair. Development or persistence of dysphagia after fundoplication is among the most common complications occurring in up to 30% of patients. Surgical factors responsible for de novo dysphagia are mainly related to the degree, tightness, length of the fundoplication and technical errors leading to wrap misconstruction -below the anatomical gastroesophageal junction or by a distortion of the esophageal diameter and orientation at the level of the crural repair.
Endoscopic extraction of a giant common bile duct stone
The Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) has become the gold standard for the treatment of cholelithiasis with a success rate of 95%.
The dimensions of a giant biliary calculus are equal to or bigger than 2cm.
Various endoscopic tools such as the mechanical lithotripsy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) have been described to treat this pathology. Surgery is offered to cases unresolved by endoscopic therapy.
Recently, the sphincteroplasty with a large-size balloon dilatation of the papilla has been described as an option for the endoscopic management of the giant biliary stone.
This is a case of extraction of giant common bile duct calculus using the combination of sphincterotomy and large-size balloon sphincteroplasty.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
2744 views
17 likes
0 comments
03:56
Endoscopic extraction of a giant common bile duct stone
The Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP) has become the gold standard for the treatment of cholelithiasis with a success rate of 95%.
The dimensions of a giant biliary calculus are equal to or bigger than 2cm.
Various endoscopic tools such as the mechanical lithotripsy or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) have been described to treat this pathology. Surgery is offered to cases unresolved by endoscopic therapy.
Recently, the sphincteroplasty with a large-size balloon dilatation of the papilla has been described as an option for the endoscopic management of the giant biliary stone.
This is a case of extraction of giant common bile duct calculus using the combination of sphincterotomy and large-size balloon sphincteroplasty.
Tips 'n tricks: successful ERCP in the presence of periampullary diverticula
Duodenal diverticula are found in approximately 10-20% of patients undergoing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP).
Usually, these diverticula lie within 2cm of the major duodenal papilla and are called juxtapapillary diverticula. They are mostly acquired and their incidence increases with age.
Juxtapapillary diverticula have often been associated with mechanical compression and they are also involved in Oddi’s sphincter dysfunction. The presence of juxtapapillary diverticula is known to influence the outcome of ERCP procedure by making it more difficult and causing some complications like bleeding. Various techniques have been advised for a more successful ERCP outcome
In this video, four cases of duodenal diverticula are presented to provide tips and tricks for the successful cannulation of the CBD and management of periampullary bleeding in case they occur.
Gf Donatelli, P Dhumane, S Perretta, B Dallemagne, J Marescaux
Surgical intervention
8 years ago
2056 views
10 likes
0 comments
09:19
Tips 'n tricks: successful ERCP in the presence of periampullary diverticula
Duodenal diverticula are found in approximately 10-20% of patients undergoing Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangio-Pancreatography (ERCP).
Usually, these diverticula lie within 2cm of the major duodenal papilla and are called juxtapapillary diverticula. They are mostly acquired and their incidence increases with age.
Juxtapapillary diverticula have often been associated with mechanical compression and they are also involved in Oddi’s sphincter dysfunction. The presence of juxtapapillary diverticula is known to influence the outcome of ERCP procedure by making it more difficult and causing some complications like bleeding. Various techniques have been advised for a more successful ERCP outcome
In this video, four cases of duodenal diverticula are presented to provide tips and tricks for the successful cannulation of the CBD and management of periampullary bleeding in case they occur.